Special Issue "Imaging-Histopathology Correlation"

A special issue of Diagnostics (ISSN 2075-4418). This special issue belongs to the section "Medical Imaging and Theranostics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2020) | Viewed by 11295

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Yicheng Ni
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Theranostic Lab, Department of Imaging and Pathology, Biomedical Group, KU Leuven, Herestraat 49, Leuven, Belgium
Interests: imaging-navigated translational theragnostic research
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

Driven by ever-advancing science and technology, imaging plays a pivotal role in the clinical diagnosis and treatment of diseases. Classified by their physical principles, imaging armamentariums include X-ray-based computed tomography (CT), radiofrequency wave-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), acoustics-based ultrasound (US) or echography, radionuclei-based single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET), optics-based optical coherence tomography (OCT), etc. These imaging techniques, alone or in hybrid, help to noninvasively visualize healthy and diseased organs and tissues in 2D or 3D with spatial resolutions ranging from millimeter to sub-micrometer, with data quantification using computer software.

However, in clinic definite diagnosis of the disease usually relies on the depiction of pathological alterations at cellular, subcellular, and molecular levels, which can be realized only by using the gold-standard technique of histopathology. Likewise, the accuracy of imaging diagnosis can be verified by such decisive histopathology sampling through needle biopsy, open surgery, and autopsy. Medical imaging and histopathology belong to macro- and microscopic morphology, respectively. Their qualitative and quantitative correlations are always what clinical and preclinical researchers strive to achieve, being more recently aided by big data and artificial intelligence (AI).  

This Special Issue welcomes contributions covering all aspects of experimental and clinical imaging–histopathology correlations as addressed above. Submissions may include articles of original research, new methodology or technical platforms, pictorial case reports with brief literature review, and overviewing showcases of the serial experiences of successful individual groups or centers.  

Prof. Dr. Yicheng Ni
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diagnostics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • imaging–histopathology correlation
  • CT
  • MRI
  • US
  • SPECT
  • PET
  • OCT
  • optical imaging
  • contrast agents
  • virtual biopsy
  • clinical
  • experimental

Published Papers (6 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review, Other

Article
Renal Tumors in Young Adults: Is Preoperative Computer Tomography Imaging Suggestive for the Nature of the Tumors?
Diagnostics 2020, 10(6), 380; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics10060380 - 07 Jun 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1321
Abstract
Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for 2–3% of all adult malignant neoplasms and is even rarer in patients under 45 years old. Clear-cell carcinoma represents most of the pathological subtypes. Our study aimed to investigate the association between preoperative computer tomography imagistic evaluation [...] Read more.
Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for 2–3% of all adult malignant neoplasms and is even rarer in patients under 45 years old. Clear-cell carcinoma represents most of the pathological subtypes. Our study aimed to investigate the association between preoperative computer tomography imagistic evaluation and histopathological diagnosis of renal tumors in young adults. Patients younger than 45 years old with renal tumors who were referred for medical treatment at the Clinical Institute of Urology and Renal Transplantation Cluj-Napoca from 2012 to 2019 were considered eligible for the study. Medical charts were retrospectively reviewed, and patients with complete data regarding preoperative diagnostic, histopathological evaluation, and follow-up data, regardless of gender, were included in the study. Sixteen patients younger than 45 years fulfilled all the inclusion criteria and were evaluated. With two exceptions, the evaluated patients were in a T1 and T2 stage, with no vascular invasion or of the adjacent organs. Two-thirds of our patients had a clear-cell renal cell carcinoma. None of our patients fitted in the low complexity surgery category of the R.E.N.A.L. Nephrometry Score and 37.5% of them benefited from partial nephrectomy. Half of the suppositions made based on imaging were concordant with the histopathology report. Fifteen of the patients showed no recurrence during the respective follow-up interval. Computer tomography imaging reports showed on our sample a higher concordance with the histopathological report in the more common subtypes (namely Renal Clear Cell RCC), with typical appearances. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Imaging-Histopathology Correlation)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Utility of Scanning Electron Microscopy Elemental Analysis Using the ‘NanoSuit’ Correlative Light and Electron Microscopy Method in the Diagnosis of Lanthanum Phosphate Deposition in the Esophagogastroduodenal Mucosa
Diagnostics 2020, 10(1), 1; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics10010001 - 18 Dec 2019
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1972
Abstract
Background: We have recently developed the correlative light and electron microscopy of hematoxylin and eosin (H&E)-stained glass slides using the ‘NanoSuit’ method. The aim of this study is to explore the utility of the new NanoSuit-correlative light and electron microscopy method combined with [...] Read more.
Background: We have recently developed the correlative light and electron microscopy of hematoxylin and eosin (H&E)-stained glass slides using the ‘NanoSuit’ method. The aim of this study is to explore the utility of the new NanoSuit-correlative light and electron microscopy method combined with scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy elemental analysis for the diagnosis of lanthanum phosphate deposition in the H&E-stained glass slides. Methods: Nine H&E-stained glass slides of the upper gastrointestinal tract mucosa containing the brown pigmented areas by light microscopic observation, which were suspected as lanthanum phosphate deposition, were observed and analyzed by scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy using the NanoSuit-correlative light and electron microscopy method. Results: In all nine slides, the new NanoSuit-correlative light and electron microscopy method combined with scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed the accumulation of both lanthanum and phosphorus in the tissue area corresponding to the brown pigment deposition. In addition to the existence of lanthanum phosphate in the stomach and duodenum, known target organs, we observed deposition in the esophagus for the first time. Furthermore, we observed lanthanum phosphate deposition in the background mucosa of stomach containing primary adenocarcinoma. Conclusions: Scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis using the NanoSuit-correlative light and electron microscopy method is useful for the diagnosis of lanthanum phosphate deposition in the H&E-stained glass slides. Lanthanum phosphate deposition occurs not only in the stomach and duodenum but also in the esophagus. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Imaging-Histopathology Correlation)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Liver Fibrosis Assessment with Diffusion-Weighted Imaging: Value of Liver Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Normalization Using the Spleen as a Reference Organ
Diagnostics 2019, 9(3), 107; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics9030107 - 28 Aug 2019
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 1737
Abstract
Liver fibrosis staging is of great clinical importance because it is used to assess the severity of the underlying chronic liver disease. Among various imaging-based methods, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurement using diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) has the potential to be used as an [...] Read more.
Liver fibrosis staging is of great clinical importance because it is used to assess the severity of the underlying chronic liver disease. Among various imaging-based methods, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurement using diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) has the potential to be used as an imaging biomarker for liver fibrosis assessment. In this study, we investigated the usefulness of liver ADC normalization using the spleen as a reference organ in liver fibrosis staging with 66 patients who underwent liver magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), transient elastography (TE), and surgical resection of a hepatic mass. ADC values of the liver (ADCliver) and spleen were analyzed, and the spleen was used for ADCliver normalization (nADCliver). ADCliver showed a weak negative correlation with TE (r = −0.246; p = 0.047) and fibrosis stage (r = −0.269; p = 0.029), while n ADCliver showed a moderate negative correlation with TE (r = −0.504; p < 0.001) and fibrosis stage (r = −0.579; p < 0.001). AUC values for nADCliver (0.777–0.875) were higher than those for ADCliver for each stage of fibrosis (0.596–0.713, p = 0.037–0.157). AUC values for TE (0.726–0.884) and nADCliver were not statistically different. In conclusion, normalized liver ADC can be useful in diagnosing liver fibrosis stage in patients with variable DWI acquisitions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Imaging-Histopathology Correlation)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research, Other

Review
From Mouse to Man and Back: Closing the Correlation Gap between Imaging and Histopathology for Lung Diseases
Diagnostics 2020, 10(9), 636; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics10090636 - 26 Aug 2020
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2068
Abstract
Lung diseases such as fibrosis, asthma, cystic fibrosis, infection and cancer are life-threatening conditions that slowly deteriorate quality of life and for which our diagnostic power is high, but our knowledge on etiology and/or effective treatment options still contains important gaps. In the [...] Read more.
Lung diseases such as fibrosis, asthma, cystic fibrosis, infection and cancer are life-threatening conditions that slowly deteriorate quality of life and for which our diagnostic power is high, but our knowledge on etiology and/or effective treatment options still contains important gaps. In the context of day-to-day practice, clinical and preclinical studies, clinicians and basic researchers team up and continuously strive to increase insights into lung disease progression, diagnostic and treatment options. To unravel disease processes and to test novel therapeutic approaches, investigators typically rely on end-stage procedures such as serum analysis, cyto-/chemokine profiles and selective tissue histology from animal models. These techniques are useful but provide only a snapshot of disease processes that are essentially dynamic in time and space. Technology allowing evaluation of live animals repeatedly is indispensable to gain a better insight into the dynamics of lung disease progression and treatment effects. Computed tomography (CT) is a clinical diagnostic imaging technique that can have enormous benefits in a research context too. Yet, the implementation of imaging techniques in laboratories lags behind. In this review we want to showcase the integrated approaches and novel developments in imaging, lung functional testing and pathological techniques that are used to assess, diagnose, quantify and treat lung disease and that may be employed in research on patients and animals. Imaging approaches result in often novel anatomical and functional biomarkers, resulting in many advantages, such as better insight in disease progression and a reduction in the numbers of animals necessary. We here showcase integrated assessment of lung disease with imaging and histopathological technologies, applied to the example of lung fibrosis. Better integration of clinical and preclinical imaging technologies with pathology will ultimately result in improved clinical translation of (therapy) study results. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Imaging-Histopathology Correlation)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review
Predicting Clinical Efficacy of Vascular Disrupting Agents in Rodent Models of Primary and Secondary Liver Cancers: An Overview with Imaging-Histopathology Correlation
Diagnostics 2020, 10(2), 78; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics10020078 - 31 Jan 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1871
Abstract
Vascular disrupting agents (VDAs) have entered clinical trials for over 15 years. As the leading VDA, combretastatin A4 phosphate (CA4P) has been evaluated in combination with chemotherapy and molecular targeting agents among patients with ovarian cancer, lung cancer and thyroid cancer, but still [...] Read more.
Vascular disrupting agents (VDAs) have entered clinical trials for over 15 years. As the leading VDA, combretastatin A4 phosphate (CA4P) has been evaluated in combination with chemotherapy and molecular targeting agents among patients with ovarian cancer, lung cancer and thyroid cancer, but still remains rarely explored in human liver cancers. To overcome tumor residues and regrowth after CA4P monotherapy, a novel dual targeting pan-anticancer theragnostic strategy, i.e., OncoCiDia, has been developed and shown promise previously in secondary liver tumor models. Animal model of primary liver cancer is time consuming to induce, but of value for more closely mimicking human liver cancers in terms of tumor angiogenesis, histopathological heterogeneity, cellular differentiation, tumor components, cancer progression and therapeutic response. Being increasingly adopted in VDA researches, multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides imaging biomarkers to reflect in vivo tumor responses to drugs. In this article as a chapter of a doctoral thesis, we overview the construction and clinical relevance of primary and secondary liver cancer models in rodents. Target selection for CA4P therapy assisted by enhanced MRI using hepatobiliary contrast agents (CAs), and therapeutic efficacy evaluated by using MRI with a non-specific contrast agent, dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) imaging, diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) are also described. We then summarize diverse responses among primary hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs), secondary liver and pancreatic tumors to CA4P, which appeared to be related to tumor size, vascularity, and cellular differentiation. In general, imaging-histopathology correlation studies allow to conclude that CA4P tends to be more effective in secondary liver tumors and in more differentiated HCCs, but less effective in less differentiated HCCs and implanted pancreatic tumor. Notably, cirrhotic liver may be responsive to CA4P as well. All these could be instructive for future clinical trials of VDAs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Imaging-Histopathology Correlation)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Research, Review

Case Report
Anaplastic Thyroid Carcinoma Histologically Mimicking a Plasmacytoma
Diagnostics 2020, 10(1), 29; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics10010029 - 08 Jan 2020
Viewed by 1925
Abstract
Anaplastic (undifferentiated) thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is a rare malignancy which may arise from transformation of a pre-existing differentiated carcinoma. We report the unique case where a lesion of thyroid origin presented with the histological features of mature plasma cells. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the lesion [...] Read more.
Anaplastic (undifferentiated) thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is a rare malignancy which may arise from transformation of a pre-existing differentiated carcinoma. We report the unique case where a lesion of thyroid origin presented with the histological features of mature plasma cells. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the lesion to be an anaplastic thyroid carcinoma arising from papillary thyroid carcinoma. A tumor mimicking a malignancy of a different cellular origin can lead clinicians to incorrect treatment approaches. Careful correlation with clinical details and knowledge of these unique presentations is important for reaching the correct diagnosis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Imaging-Histopathology Correlation)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop