Special Issue "Epidemiology and Risk Factors of Skin Cancer"

A special issue of Current Oncology (ISSN 1718-7729). This special issue belongs to the section "Dermato-Oncology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2022 | Viewed by 1550

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Leslie K. Dennis
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85724, USA
Interests: cancer epidemiology; cancer control; melanoma; infectious causes of cancer; melanoma etiology and prevention

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Skin cancer altogether accounts for more cancers than other cancers combined. We are well aware of the importance of ultraviolet radiation via sun exposure in the development of skin cancer. Despite this, certain aspects of specific types of sun exposure in different populations need further clarification, particularly for non-melanoma skin cancers. Published reports on surveillance for non-melanoma skin cancers are infrequent. Few studies have reported non-UVR risk factors for BCC, SCC, nevi and melanoma.

This Special Issue aims to expand our knowledge on the risk factors for skin cancer, including specific types of sun exposure beyond sun exposure when data are available.

Current Oncology is an international, peer-reviewed open access journal on oncology. This Special Issue invites a range of papers from original research articles to comprehensive reviews on risk factors and surveillance for non-melanoma skin cancers (BCC, SCC and others), nevi and melanoma.

We welcome manuscripts in the following formats:

  • Original research;
  • Review articles;
  • Short communications;

I look forward to receiving your contributions.

Prof. Dr. Leslie K. Dennis
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Current Oncology is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • epidemiology
  • etiology
  • risk factors
  • BCC
  • SCC
  • melanoma
  • nevi
  • ultraviolet radiation (UVR)

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Treatment of Basal Cell Carcinoma with Electrochemotherapy: Insights from the InspECT Registry (2008–2019)
Curr. Oncol. 2022, 29(8), 5324-5337; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol29080423 - 28 Jul 2022
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Abstract
This prospective registry-based study aims to describe electrochemotherapy (ECT) modalities in basal cell carcinoma (BCC) patients and evaluate its efficacy, safety, and predictive factors. The International Network for Sharing Practices of Electrochemotherapy (InspECT) multicentre database was queried for BCC cases treated with bleomycin-ECT [...] Read more.
This prospective registry-based study aims to describe electrochemotherapy (ECT) modalities in basal cell carcinoma (BCC) patients and evaluate its efficacy, safety, and predictive factors. The International Network for Sharing Practices of Electrochemotherapy (InspECT) multicentre database was queried for BCC cases treated with bleomycin-ECT between 2008 and 2019 (n = 330 patients from seven countries, with 623 BCCs [median number: 1/patient; range: 1–7; size: 13 mm, range: 5–350; 85% were primary, and 80% located in the head and neck]). The procedure was carried out under local anaesthesia in 68% of cases, with the adjunct of mild sedation in the remaining 32%. Of 300 evaluable patients, 242 (81%) achieved a complete response (CR) after a single ECT course. Treatment naïvety (odds ratio [OR] 0.35, 95% confidence interval [C.I.] 0.19–0.67, p = 0.001) and coverage of deep tumour margin with electric pulses (O.R. 5.55, 95% C.I. 1.37–21.69, p = 0.016) predicted CR, whereas previous radiation was inversely correlated (O.R. 0.25, p = 0.0051). Toxicity included skin ulceration (overall, 16%; G3, 1%) and hyperpigmentation (overall, 8.1%; G3, 2.5%). At a 17-month follow-up, 28 (9.3%) patients experienced local recurrence/progression. Despite no convincing evidence that ECT confers improved outcomes compared with standard surgical excision, it can still be considered an opportunity to avoid major resection in patients unsuitable for more demanding treatment. Treatment naïvety and coverage of the deep margin predict tumour clearance and may inform current patient selection and management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Epidemiology and Risk Factors of Skin Cancer)
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Article
Cutaneous Melanoma in Alpine Population: Incidence Trends and Clinicopathological Profile
Curr. Oncol. 2022, 29(3), 2165-2173; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol29030175 - 21 Mar 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 806
Abstract
Previous studies associated high-level exposure to ultraviolet radiation with a greater risk of cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM). This study focuses on the changing incidence of CMM over time (from 1990 to 2017) in the Veneto region of Northeast Italy, and its Alpine area [...] Read more.
Previous studies associated high-level exposure to ultraviolet radiation with a greater risk of cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM). This study focuses on the changing incidence of CMM over time (from 1990 to 2017) in the Veneto region of Northeast Italy, and its Alpine area (the province of Belluno). The clinicopathological profile of CMM by residence is also considered. A joinpoint regression analysis was performed to identify significant changes in the yearly incidence of CMM by sex and age. For each trend, the average annual percent change (AAPC) was also calculated. In the 2017 CMM cohort, the study includes a descriptive analysis of the disease’s categorical clinicopathological variables. In the population investigated, the incidence of CMM has increased significantly over the last 30 years. The AAPC in the incidence of CMM was significantly higher among Alpine residents aged 0–49 than for the rest of the region’s population (males: 6.9 versus 2.4; females 7.7 versus 2.7, respectively). Among the Alpine residents, the AAPC was 3.35 times greater for females aged 0–49 than for people aged 50+. The clinicopathological profile of CMM was significantly associated with the place of residence. Over three decades, the Veneto population has observed a significant increase in the incidence of CMM, and its AAPC. Both trends have been markedly more pronounced among Alpine residents, particularly younger females. While epidemiology and clinicopathological profiles support the role of UV radiation in CMM, the young age of this CMM-affected female population points to other possible host-related etiological factors. These findings also confirm the importance of primary and secondary prevention strategies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Epidemiology and Risk Factors of Skin Cancer)
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