Nutritional Assessment and Management of Cancer Patients

A special issue of Current Oncology (ISSN 1718-7729). This special issue belongs to the section "Palliative and Supportive Care".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2023) | Viewed by 7386

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Hygiene and Environmental Protection, Medical School, Democritus University of Thrace, 68100 Alexandroupoli, Greece
Interests: public health; hygiene; medicinal chemistry; natural products; antioxidants; pharmacoepidemiology; nutritional epidemiology; structure-activity relationships; drug utilisation; risk minimization and communication
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Malnutrition is a common finding in cancer patients, which can affect disease progression and survival. Substantial studies have shown that weight loss in cancer is associated with poor prognosis, poor quality of life, lower activity level, increased treatment-related adverse symptoms, and reduced tumor response to therapy. Nutritional interventions may down-regulate cancer progression and increase patients’ survival. Several healthy dietary plans, such as the Mediterranean Diet, may protect against cancer malnutrition, also contributing to the co-treatment with the standard therapy and even providing prevention against cancer development and progression. In view of the above consideration, the present Special Issue aims to highlight the crucial role of the nutritional assessment and management of cancer patients in relation to disease progression and prognosis. Novel dietary interventions and nutritional observational studies for the management, co-treatment, and prevention of cancer disease will also be presented.

  • Nutritional assessment tools and their impact on cancer progression and survival.
  • Dietary interventions for improving health related quality of life and prognosis of cancer patients.
  • Nutritional observational studies related to cancer progression and prognosis.
  • Dietary patterns and/or specific dietary food groups (e.g. fruits, legumes) and their bioactive compounds (e.g., phytochemicals, flavonoids, etc.) in the co-treatment and prevention of cancer disease.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Constantinos Giaginis
Dr. Christos Kontogiorgis
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Current Oncology is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nutritional assessment
  • dietary interventions
  • nutritional observational studies
  • dietary patterns
  • cancer progression and prognosis
  • cancer co-treatment
  • cancer prevention

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

14 pages, 1580 KiB  
Article
Why We Should Look at Dinner Plates: Diet Changes in Cancer Patients
by Katja Döring, Lara Wiechers, Jens Büntzel and Judith Büntzel
Curr. Oncol. 2023, 30(3), 2715-2728; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol30030205 - 23 Feb 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1650
Abstract
Objective: Malnutrition is often underestimated in the context of cancer therapy: the dietary trends initiated by patients after diagnosis are usually neither known to nor evaluated by the medical staff. Here, we propose a combined screening instrument evaluating malnutrition and dietary trends. Methods: [...] Read more.
Objective: Malnutrition is often underestimated in the context of cancer therapy: the dietary trends initiated by patients after diagnosis are usually neither known to nor evaluated by the medical staff. Here, we propose a combined screening instrument evaluating malnutrition and dietary trends. Methods: The validated screening tool NRS-2002 was combined with a four-item questionnaire assessing whether (1) patients preferred certain foods, (2) avoided certain foods, (3) used dietary supplements or followed a special diet since the time of cancer diagnosis. The screening tool was routinely used by cancer patients in the daily practice of three oncological departments. The presented analysis was performed retrospectively and anonymized. Results: Overall, 102 cancer patients undergoing systemic therapy (CP), 97 undergoing radiation therapy (RP), and 36 head–neck cancer patients (HNP) were screened. The CP cohort showed a higher rate of malnutrition (50.00%) than the HNP (28.13%) or RP (26.80%) cohort. Overall, diet changes were observed in 33.63% of all patients. Avoiding meat, stimulants, or hard and edgy food was often mentioned in free text answers, while patients reported a preference for fruit and vegetables. Nutritional supplements were used by 28.76% of the patients. While dietary changes were common, only 6.64% of the patients mentioned adhering to a specific cancer diet. Conclusion: Malnutrition is still underestimated nowadays. Diet trends, especially avoiding certain foods, are common in cancer patients, while adhering to a specific cancer diet is an exception. Diet trends should be assessed and addressed to avoid or aggravate malnutrition. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutritional Assessment and Management of Cancer Patients)
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 2239 KiB  
Article
Poor Muscle Status, Dietary Protein Intake, Exercise Levels, Quality of Life and Physical Function in Women with Metastatic Breast Cancer at Chemotherapy Commencement and during Follow-Up
by Jessica Parkinson, Amelia Bandera, Megan Crichton, Catherine Shannon, Natasha Woodward, Adam Hodgkinson, Luke Millar, Laisa Teleni and Barbara S. van der Meij
Curr. Oncol. 2023, 30(1), 688-703; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol30010054 - 5 Jan 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2581
Abstract
This study aimed to investigate nutritional status, body composition, dietary protein intake, handgrip strength, 6 min or 4 m walk tests, self-reported physical activity, physical function, and quality of life (QoL-EORTC-QLQc30) at commencement of chemotherapy; to detect changes over time (from commencement of [...] Read more.
This study aimed to investigate nutritional status, body composition, dietary protein intake, handgrip strength, 6 min or 4 m walk tests, self-reported physical activity, physical function, and quality of life (QoL-EORTC-QLQc30) at commencement of chemotherapy; to detect changes over time (from commencement of chemotherapy, and after 3, 6, 12, 26 and 52 weeks) in women with metastatic breast cancer (MBC); and to investigate the relationship between nutritional variables. ‘Sarcopenia’ was defined as low muscle mass and strength, ‘myosteatosis’ as muscle fat-infiltration (CT scan). Continuous variables were analysed using paired t-tests between baseline and follow-ups. Fifteen women (54y, 95% CI [46.3;61.2]) were recruited. At baseline, malnutrition was present in 3 (20%) participants, sarcopenia in 3 (20%) and myosteatosis in 7 (54%). Thirteen (87%) participants had low protein intake; low handgrip strength was observed in 0, and low walk test distance and physical activity in four (27%) participants. Physical function and QoL were low in 10 (67%) and 9 (60%), respectively. QoL between baseline and 52 weeks decreased by 11.7 (95% CI [2.4;20.9], p = 0.025). Other variables did not significantly change over time. In this small study sample, myosteatosis, low dietary protein intake, low exercise levels and impaired quality of life and physical function are common. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutritional Assessment and Management of Cancer Patients)
Show Figures

Figure 1

10 pages, 623 KiB  
Article
Dietary Habits Are Related to Phase Angle in Male Patients with Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer
by Paraskevi Detopoulou, Theodora Tsiouda, Maria Pilikidou, Foteini Palyvou, Maria Mantzorou, Persefoni Perzirkianidou, Krystallia Kyrka, Spyridon Methenitis, Foivi S. Kondyli, Gavriela Voulgaridou, Paul Zarogoulidis, Dimitris Matthaios, Rena Oikonomidou, Maria Romanidou, Dimitrios Giannakidis and Sousana K. Papadopoulou
Curr. Oncol. 2022, 29(11), 8074-8083; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol29110637 - 26 Oct 2022
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2263
Abstract
Introduction: Lung cancer constitutes the most common cause of cancer death. Phase angle (PhA) has been related to lung cancer prognosis, which implies that the identification of dietary or other factors that could predict or modify PhA may have beneficial effects. Νutritional interventions [...] Read more.
Introduction: Lung cancer constitutes the most common cause of cancer death. Phase angle (PhA) has been related to lung cancer prognosis, which implies that the identification of dietary or other factors that could predict or modify PhA may have beneficial effects. Νutritional interventions have been linked with positive changes in PhA in certain types of cancer. Aim: The present study aimed to investigate the relationships between dietary habits/nutrition and PhA in NSCLC patients. Methods: The sample consisted of 82 male patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC; stage IV) from the ‘Theageneio’ Cancer Hospital (Thessaloniki, Greece). Several parameters were assessed, such as body mass index (BMI), lean mass, PhA, Mediterranean diet score (MedDietScore), dietary patterns, smoking, resting metabolic rate, resting oxygen consumption (VO2), ventilation rate, and physical activity. Results: According to our results, a dietary pattern rich in potatoes and animal proteins (meat and poultry) was a significant determinant of PhA (B ± SE, p: 0.165 ± 0.08, p = 0.05) in multiple linear regression models after adjusting for age, smoking, lean tissue, and MedDietScore. Conclusion: In conclusion, dietary patterns may affect PhA, suggesting the crucial role of protein in cancer management and the prevention of sarcopenia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutritional Assessment and Management of Cancer Patients)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop