Redox Biomarkers in Dietary Interventions and Nutritional Observation Studies

A special issue of Antioxidants (ISSN 2076-3921). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Outcomes of Antioxidants and Oxidative Stress".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 May 2023) | Viewed by 5521

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Laboratory of Hygiene and Environmental Protection, Medical School, Democritus University of Thrace, 68100 Alexandroupoli, Greece
Interests: public health; hygiene; medicinal chemistry; natural products; antioxidants; pharmacoepidemiology; nutritional epidemiology; structure-activity relationships; drug utilisation; risk minimization and communication
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Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Health Sciences, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece
Interests: medicinal chemistry; natural products; antioxidants; anti-inflammatory activity; pharmacokinetics; drug design; structure–activity relationships
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Oxidative stress is a common feature of several human diseases; it interacts with various biomacromolecules and leads to the formation of a variety of substances which are often referred to as redox biomarkers. Currently, several interventional and observational studies have been performed in both healthy participants and patients to assess potential associations of dietary habits, foodstuffs or isolated nutrients with biomarkers of oxidative stress. Among them, fruits and vegetables, seafood, vitamins D and E, probiotics, ω-fatty acids, phytochemicals, magnesium, zinc, chromium, selenium and medicinal plants and herbs have shown inverse associations with redox biomarkers. However, few studies have measured biomarkers from all three standard categories: oxidative damage, endogenous antioxidants, and exogenous antioxidants. Moreover, many studies have relied on controversial assays for the determination of total antioxidant capacity. Thus, most of the existing results seem inconsistent and inconclusive, reinforcing the need for future well-designed studies to be performed. In view of the above, the present Special Issue aims to highlight novel dietary interventions and nutritional observation studies conducted both in healthy participants and patients that investigate potential beneficial associations of dietary habits, foodstuffs or isolated nutrients with biomarkers of oxidative stress. In this Special Issue, original research articles and reviews are welcome. Research areas may include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • Dietary interventions and antioxidants biomarkers;
  • Nutritional observation studies and redox biomarkers;
  • Dietary habits, foodstuffs and isolated nutrients and antioxidant balance;
  • Oxidative stress conditions in pathophysiological disease states (e.g., obesity, metabolic disorders, cardiovascular diseases, hypertension, dyslipidemia, neurogenerative diseases, diet-related cancer).

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Constantinos Giaginis
Dr. Christos Kontogiorgis
Dr. Eleni Pontiki
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • dietary interventions
  • nutritional observation studies
  • redox biomarkers
  • dietary habits
  • foodstuffs
  • nutrients

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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11 pages, 2211 KiB  
Article
Targeted Metabolomics Analysis Suggests That Tacrolimus Alters Protection against Oxidative Stress
by Marie Joncquel, Julie Labasque, Julie Demaret, Marie-Adélaïde Bout, Aghilès Hamroun, Benjamin Hennart, Mathieu Tronchon, Magali Defevre, Isabelle Kim, Alain Kerckhove, Laurence George, Mylène Gilleron, Anne-Frédérique Dessein, Farid Zerimech and Guillaume Grzych
Antioxidants 2023, 12(7), 1412; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox12071412 - 12 Jul 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1212
Abstract
Tacrolimus (FK506) is an immunosuppressant that is experiencing a continuous rise in usage worldwide. The related side effects are known to be globally dose-dependent. Despite numerous studies on FK506, the mechanisms underlying FK506 toxicity are still not well understood. It is therefore essential [...] Read more.
Tacrolimus (FK506) is an immunosuppressant that is experiencing a continuous rise in usage worldwide. The related side effects are known to be globally dose-dependent. Despite numerous studies on FK506, the mechanisms underlying FK506 toxicity are still not well understood. It is therefore essential to explore the toxicity mediated by FK506. To accomplish this, we conducted a targeted metabolomic analysis using LC−MS on the plasma samples of patients undergoing FK506 treatment. The aim was to identify any associated altered metabolic pathway. Another anti-calcineurin immunosuppressive therapy, ciclosporin (CSA), was also studied. Increased plasma concentrations of pipecolic acid (PA) and sarcosine, along with a decrease in the glycine/sarcosine ratio and a tendency of increased plasma lysine was observed in patients under FK506 compared to control samples. Patients under CSA do not show an increase in plasma PA compared to the control samples, which does not support a metabolic link between the calcineurin and PA. The metabolomics changes observed in patients under FK506 highlight a possible link between FK506 and the action of an enzyme involved in both PA and sarcosine catabolism and oxidative pathway, the Peroxisomal sarcosine oxidase (PIPOX). Moreover, PA could be investigated as a potential biomarker of early nephrotoxicity in the follow-up of patients under FK506. Full article
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17 pages, 694 KiB  
Article
Mediterranean Diet Adherence Is Associated with Favorable Health-Related Quality of Life, Physical Activity, and Sleep Quality in a Community-Dwelling Greek Older Population
by Maria Mantzorou, Maria Mentzelou, Georgios K. Vasios, Christos Kontogiorgis, Georgios Antasouras, Konstantinos Vadikolias, Evmorfia Psara, Theofanis Vorvolakos, Efthymios Poulios, Aspasia Serdari, Sousana K. Papadopoulou and Constantinos Giaginis
Antioxidants 2023, 12(5), 983; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox12050983 - 22 Apr 2023
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1915
Abstract
Background: The Mediterranean diet (MD) is a beneficial dietary pattern with strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties that can promote mental and physical human health. This study aims to assess the impact of MD adherence on health-related quality of life, physical activity levels, and [...] Read more.
Background: The Mediterranean diet (MD) is a beneficial dietary pattern with strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties that can promote mental and physical human health. This study aims to assess the impact of MD adherence on health-related quality of life, physical activity levels, and sleep quality in a representative Greek elderly population. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study. A total of 3254 persons ≥65 years from 14 different Greek regions, urban, rural and islands participated in this study, of which 48.4% were female and 51.6% were male. Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQOL) was evaluated utilizing a short form healthy survey, physical activity was determined by the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ), sleep quality was assessed utilizing the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and MD adherence was assessed via the Mediterranean Diet Score (MedDietScore). Results: Moderate adherence to the MD and an increased prevalence of poor quality of life, low physical activity levels and inadequate sleep quality among the elderly population were recorded. High MD adherence was independently associated with better quality of life (OR: 2.31, 95% CI: 2.06–2.68, p = 0.0008), higher physical activity (OR: 1.89, 95% CI: 1.47–2.35, p = 0.0141) and adequate sleep quality (OR: 2.11, 95%: 1.79–2.44, p = 0.0018), female sex (OR: 1.36, 95% CI: 1.02–1.68, p = 0.0032) and living with others (OR: 1.24, 95% CI: 0.81–1.76, p = 0.0375), after adjustment for potential confounding factors. In unadjusted analysis, participants’ age (p < 0.0001), anthropometric characteristics (p < 0.005), educational (p = 0.0026) and financial status (p = 0.0005) and smoking habits (p = 0.0031) were also identified as indicators of MD adherence; however, their impact on MD adherence was considerably attenuated after adjusting for confounding factors (p > 0.05). Conclusion: High MD adherence was correlated with favorable quality of life, higher levels of physical activity, and a more adequate sleep quality score. Strategies and public health policies that facilitate MD adherence and physical activity in older adults may improve sleep and quality of life, impacting overall wellbeing in this age group. Full article
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Review

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22 pages, 1320 KiB  
Review
Redox Remodeling by Nutraceuticals for Prevention and Treatment of Acute and Chronic Inflammation
by Claudia Petrarca and Davide Viola
Antioxidants 2023, 12(1), 132; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox12010132 - 5 Jan 2023
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1827
Abstract
Antioxidant-rich dietary regimens are considered the best practice to maintain health, control inflammation, and prevent inflammatory diseases. Yet, nutraceuticals as food supplements are self-prescribed and purchasable over the counter by healthy individuals for the purpose of beneficial effects on fitness and aging. Hence, [...] Read more.
Antioxidant-rich dietary regimens are considered the best practice to maintain health, control inflammation, and prevent inflammatory diseases. Yet, nutraceuticals as food supplements are self-prescribed and purchasable over the counter by healthy individuals for the purpose of beneficial effects on fitness and aging. Hence, the effectiveness, safety, and correct intake of these compounds need to be better explored. Since redox-modulating activity of these compounds appears to be involved in activation and or suppression of immune cells, the preventive use of nutraceuticals is very attractive even for healthy people. This review focuses on redox- and immunomodulating nutraceuticals in the context of diabetes mellitus (DM). In fact, DM is an illustrative disease of latent and predictable inflammatory pathogenetic processes set out and sustained by oxidative stress. DM has been thoroughly investigated through in vitro and in vivo models. Furthermore, human DM is characterized by uncontrolled levels of glucose, a pivotal factor shaping immune responses. Hence, antioxidant nutraceuticals with multifaced activities, including glucose keeping, are described here. A greater number of such multi-player nutraceuticals might be identified using DM animal models and validated in clinical settings on genetic and environmental high-risk individuals. Full article
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