Autophagy and RNA: Functional and Molecular Interplay in Health and Disease

A special issue of Cells (ISSN 2073-4409). This special issue belongs to the section "Autophagy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 December 2021) | Viewed by 5386

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark
Interests: autophagy; RNA; RNA-binding proteins; ribosomes; translation

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Guest Editor
Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada
Interests: RNA; autophagy; extracellular vesicles; post-transcriptional regulation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The evolutionarily conserved process of autophagy serves to eliminate and recycle superfluous or damaged cellular components, with crucial importance for cellular physiology in health, infection and disease. Beyond its traditionally studied roles in maintaining protein, lipid and organelle homeostasis, increasing evidence indicates that autophagy can impact RNA homeostasis. Autophagy can degrade RNA, RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) and ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes and beyond its degradive capabilities, core autophagy players can additionally contribute to intracellular transport or extracellular release of RNA and related complexes. The physiological importance of these events is underscored by their broad impact on gene expression, cellular function, disease and organism survival. Autophagy itself is also regulated by RNAs and RBPs i.e. at the post-transcriptional and translational levels. During stress, when autophagy is enhanced, mRNA stability and translation is profoundly modulated and this allows selective processing and/or translation of key autophagy-related transcripts as part of these responses.

In this special issue of Cells, we invite you to contribute, either in the form of an original research article, review or shorter perspective article on all aspects of the theme that ties Autophagy to RNA. Articles describing cellular, biochemical, mechanistic and physiological aspects relevant to this topic, spanning several organisms from yeast to human, are welcomed. Encouraged topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • RNA decay and nucleotide recycling by autophagy
  • Lysosomal RNAses
  • Autophagy-mediated degradation of RNA-binding proteins and RNP complexes
  • Ribosome degradation by autophagy
  • Regulation of autophagy by RNA and RNA-binding proteins
  • Post-transcriptional and translational regulation of autophagy
  • RNA and RBP transport and secretion by autophagy/lysosomes or related pathways
  • Implications for the Autophagy-RNA interplay in physiology and disease
  • Non-coding RNA and autophagy
Dr. Lisa B. Frankel
Dr. Derrick J. Gibbings
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • RNA 
  • Autophagy 
  • Lysosomes 
  • RNA-binding proteins 
  • RNA homeostasis 
  • Post-transcriptional regulation 
  • Translation regulation 
  • Gene expression 
  • Non-coding RNA

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

12 pages, 689 KiB  
Review
Transcriptional and Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Autophagy
by Qiuqin Ma, Shihui Long, Zhending Gan, Gianluca Tettamanti, Kang Li and Ling Tian
Cells 2022, 11(3), 441; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells11030441 - 27 Jan 2022
Cited by 19 | Viewed by 4647
Abstract
Autophagy is a widely conserved process in eukaryotes that is involved in a series of physiological and pathological events, including development, immunity, neurodegenerative disease, and tumorigenesis. It is regulated by nutrient deprivation, energy stress, and other unfavorable conditions through multiple pathways. In general, [...] Read more.
Autophagy is a widely conserved process in eukaryotes that is involved in a series of physiological and pathological events, including development, immunity, neurodegenerative disease, and tumorigenesis. It is regulated by nutrient deprivation, energy stress, and other unfavorable conditions through multiple pathways. In general, autophagy is synergistically governed at the RNA and protein levels. The upstream transcription factors trigger or inhibit the expression of autophagy- or lysosome-related genes to facilitate or reduce autophagy. Moreover, a significant number of non-coding RNAs (microRNA, circRNA, and lncRNA) are reported to participate in autophagy regulation. Finally, post-transcriptional modifications, such as RNA methylation, play a key role in controlling autophagy occurrence. In this review, we summarize the progress on autophagy research regarding transcriptional regulation, which will provide the foundations and directions for future studies on this self-eating process. Full article
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