Special Issue "Immunohistochemistry and Cancer Diagnosis"

A special issue of Cancers (ISSN 2072-6694).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Paul Hofman

Laboratory of Clinical and Experimental Pathology, University Côte d’Azur, Nice, France
Website 1 | Website 2 | E-Mail
Interests: lung cancer; biomarkers; liquid biopsy; pathology; molecular pathology; immunohistochemistry

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Immunohistochemistry is a pivotal tool allowing to quickly perform the diagnosis of many cancers, but also to establish the prognosis of some of them. More recently, IHC, through the use of new biomarkers, can be predictive of responsiveness of some targeted therapies. In this latter field, a couple of antibodies have been developed and can be routinely used to predict the efficiency of drugs targeting some genomic alterations; not only some mutations, but also some rearrangements. More recently, different antibodies have been available to be predictive of immunotherapy, in particular some PD-L1 antibodies which can be used as a companion or as a complementary diagnostic test for PD1/PDL1 molecules. Many other antibodies will come soon in the future to detect other molecules which could be predictive of new other immunotherapies. However, it is crucial to look for high quality development/control when using antibodies dedicated to theranosis. Currently, the route for laboratory developed test and commercial test is very challenging and complex, particularly to ensure that cancer patients can receive the accurate and representative test outcomes. In this context, accreditation process is certainly one of the best practices to be set up in pathology laboratories to ensure the quality of IHC results.

This Special Issue will highlight the current development of IHC in cancer: it will provide, i) a practical approach in the interpretation and immunohistochemical selection of lung/pleura-based neoplasms obtained from small biopsy and cytological samples, ii) the use of new predictive biomarkers which can provide results essential for timely and accurate therapeutic decision making in the era of the so called stratified medicine, iii) some algorithms using IHC for improvement of CUP diagnosis, and iv) the interest to get accreditation in IHC for a pathology laboratory to ensure a high quality level of the results.

Prof. Dr. Paul Hofman
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cancers is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Review

Open AccessReview
Immunohistochemistry for Diagnosis of Metastatic Carcinomas of Unknown Primary Site
Cancers 2018, 10(4), 108; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers10040108
Received: 10 February 2018 / Revised: 31 March 2018 / Accepted: 2 April 2018 / Published: 5 April 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (44166 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Immunohistochemistry has become an essential ancillary examination for the identification and classification of carcinomas of unknown primary site (CUPs). Over the last decade, the diagnostic accuracy of organ- or tumour-specific immunomarkers and the clinical validation of effective immunohistochemical panels has improved significantly. When [...] Read more.
Immunohistochemistry has become an essential ancillary examination for the identification and classification of carcinomas of unknown primary site (CUPs). Over the last decade, the diagnostic accuracy of organ- or tumour-specific immunomarkers and the clinical validation of effective immunohistochemical panels has improved significantly. When dealing with small sample sizes, diagnostic accuracy is crucial, particularly in the current era of targeted molecular and immune-based therapies. Effective systematic use of appropriate immunohistochemical panels enables accurate classification of most of the undifferentiated carcinomas as well as careful preservation of tissues for potential molecular or other ancillary tests. This review discusses the algorithmic approach to the diagnosis of CUPs using CK7 and CK20 staining patterns. It outlines the most frequently used tissue-specific antibodies, provides some pitfalls essential in avoiding potential diagnostic errors and discusses the complementary tools, such as molecular tumour profiling and mutation-specific antibodies, for the improvement of diagnosis and prediction of the treatment response. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Immunohistochemistry and Cancer Diagnosis)
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Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Update on Immunohistochemistry for the Diagnosis of Lung Cancer
Received: 3 February 2018 / Revised: 9 March 2018 / Accepted: 13 March 2018 / Published: 14 March 2018
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (8021 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Immunohistochemistry is a widely available technique that is less challenging and can provide clinically meaningful results quickly and cost-efficiently in comparison with other techniques. In addition, immunohistochemistry allows for the evaluation of cellular localization of proteins in the context of tumor structure. In [...] Read more.
Immunohistochemistry is a widely available technique that is less challenging and can provide clinically meaningful results quickly and cost-efficiently in comparison with other techniques. In addition, immunohistochemistry allows for the evaluation of cellular localization of proteins in the context of tumor structure. In an era of precision medicine, pathologists are required to classify lung cancer into specific subtypes and assess biomarkers relevant to molecular-targeted therapies. This review summarizes the hot topics of immunohistochemistry in lung cancer, including (i) adenocarcinoma vs squamous cell carcinoma; (ii) neuroendocrine markers; (iii) ALK, ROS1, and EGFR; (iv) PD-L1 (CD274); (v) lung carcinoma vs malignant mesothelioma; and (vi) NUT carcinoma. Major pitfalls in evaluating immunohistochemical results are also described. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Immunohistochemistry and Cancer Diagnosis)
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Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Any Place for Immunohistochemistry within the Predictive Biomarkers of Treatment in Lung Cancer Patients?
Received: 27 January 2018 / Revised: 25 February 2018 / Accepted: 9 March 2018 / Published: 13 March 2018
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (6702 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The identification of certain genomic alterations (EGFR, ALK, ROS1, BRAF) or immunological markers (PD-L1) in tissues or cells has led to targeted treatment for patients presenting with late stage or metastatic lung cancer. These biomarkers can be detected [...] Read more.
The identification of certain genomic alterations (EGFR, ALK, ROS1, BRAF) or immunological markers (PD-L1) in tissues or cells has led to targeted treatment for patients presenting with late stage or metastatic lung cancer. These biomarkers can be detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and/or by molecular biology (MB) techniques. These approaches are often complementary but depending on, the quantity and quality of the biological material, the urgency to get the results, the access to technological platforms, the financial resources and the expertise of the team, the choice of the approach can be questioned. The possibility of detecting simultaneously several molecular targets, and of analyzing the degree of tumor mutation burden and of the micro-satellite instability, as well as the recent requirement to quantify the expression of PD-L1 in tumor cells, has led to case by case development of algorithms and international recommendations, which depend on the quality and quantity of biological samples. This review will highlight the different predictive biomarkers detected by IHC for treatment of lung cancer as well as the present advantages and limitations of this approach. A number of perspectives will be considered. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Immunohistochemistry and Cancer Diagnosis)
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