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Special Issue "Brain Tumor Microenvironment"

A special issue of Cancers (ISSN 2072-6694). This special issue belongs to the section "Tumor Microenvironment".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 March 2023 | Viewed by 597

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Annunziato Mangiola
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Neurosciences, Imaging and Clinical Sciences, “G. D’Annunzio” University, Chieti, Italy
Interests: neurosurgery; neuro-oncology; brain tumor microenvironment; intraoperative imaging; functional neuro-oncology
Dr. Gianluca Trevisi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Neurosciences, Imaging and Clinical Sciences, “G. D’Annunzio” University, Chieti, Italy
Interests: neurosurgery; neuro-oncology; brain tumor microenvironment; intraoperative imaging; functional neuro-oncology

Special Issue Information

Aim: In this Special Issue authors will focus on molecular, histopathological and imaging features of primary and metastatic brain tumor microenvironment. This Special Issue will include pre-clinical and clinical  studies focusing on biological characterization, physio-pathological insights, clinico-pathological applications including advanced imaging techniques and the identification of new potential therapeutic targets and agents. Included studies may be based on preclinical models as well as clinical series. Original research manuscript are favored. High quality systematic reviews and meta-analysis will be also considered for publication.

Scope: Identification, through pre-clinical and clinical models, of molecular features and mechanisms, possible targets, therapeutic agents, and innovative imaging strategies in primary and metastatic brain tumors.

Dear Colleagues,

The unique brain microenvironment, with peculiar cell types and immune environment, anatomical structures including blood-brain-barrier, and metabolic constraints represent the landscape where primary and metastatic brain tumors origin and grow, influencing their biological behavior.

Indeed, gliomas, the most common malignant primary brain tumors, are still a major challenge for neurosurgeons and neuro-oncologists due to their high recurrence rate and overall poor survival.

Cellular interactions among cancer cells and resident and recruited, tumor-associated, immune cells, stromal cells, glial cells, extracellular matrix,  affect tumor growth and resistance to therapies. Recently, extracellular vesicles/exosomes have been shown to take part to the cross-talk between tumor cells and adjacent brain, with a possible role as brain tumors  biomarker.

Similar mechanisms favor the seeding and development of metastatic brain tumors, with the brain microenvironment, drastically different from microenvironments of extracranial lesions, imposing a distinct and profound selective pressure on tumor cells that, in turn, shapes the metastatic process and therapeutic responses.

We are pleased to invite you (…)

Submit your research focusing on molecular, histopathological and imaging features of primary and metastatic brain tumor microenvironment. This Special Issue will include pre-clinical and clinical  studies focusing on biological characterization, physio-pathological insights, clinico-pathological applications including advanced imaging techniques and the identification of new potential therapeutic targets and agents. Included studies may be based on preclinical models as well as clinical series. Original research manuscript are favored. High quality systematic reviews and meta-analysis will be also considered for publication.

This Special Issue aims to

Underpin genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic characteristics of brain tumor microenvironment which influence tumor growth, behavior, and resistance to therapy. This will help to develop or validate pre-clinical and clinical models aimed to detect therapeutic targets and agents for primary and metastatic brain tumors. Also studies on extracellular vesicles/exosomes and their role in the cross-talk between tumor cells and adjacent brain are welcome.

In this Special Issue, original research articles and reviews are welcome. Research areas may include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic studies on brain tumor microenvironment
  • preclinical models aimed to detect possible biomarkers, therapeutic targets and/or therapeutic agents
  • clinical series on possible biomarkers, therapeutic targets and/or therapeutic agents
  • advanced imaging techniques, including nuclear medicine studies and intraoperative imaging to characterize brain tumor microenvironment
  • surgical series using innovative tools or strategies to target brain tumor microenvironment

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Prof. Annunziato Mangiola
Dr. Gianluca Trevisi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cancers is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • CNS immunity
  • brain metastasis
  • brain tumor
  • glioma
  • microenvironment
  • microglia
  • niche
  • immunotherapy
  • peripheral brain zone
  • tumor microenvironment

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Glucose and Inositol Transporters, SLC5A1 and SLC5A3, in Glioblastoma Cell Migration
Cancers 2022, 14(23), 5794; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers14235794 - 24 Nov 2022
Viewed by 282
Abstract
(1) Background: The recurrence of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is mainly due to invasion of the surrounding brain tissue, where organic solutes, including glucose and inositol, are abundant. Invasive cell migration has been linked to the aberrant expression of transmembrane solute-linked carriers (SLC). Here, [...] Read more.
(1) Background: The recurrence of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is mainly due to invasion of the surrounding brain tissue, where organic solutes, including glucose and inositol, are abundant. Invasive cell migration has been linked to the aberrant expression of transmembrane solute-linked carriers (SLC). Here, we explore the role of glucose (SLC5A1) and inositol transporters (SLC5A3) in GBM cell migration. (2) Methods: Using immunofluorescence microscopy, we visualized the subcellular localization of SLC5A1 and SLC5A3 in two highly motile human GBM cell lines. We also employed wound-healing assays to examine the effect of SLC inhibition on GBM cell migration and examined the chemotactic potential of inositol. (3) Results: While GBM cell migration was significantly increased by extracellular inositol and glucose, it was strongly impaired by SLC transporter inhibition. In the GBM cell monolayers, both SLCs were exclusively detected in the migrating cells at the monolayer edge. In single GBM cells, both transporters were primarily localized at the leading edge of the lamellipodium. Interestingly, in GBM cells migrating via blebbing, SLC5A1 and SLC5A3 were predominantly detected in nascent and mature blebs, respectively. (4) Conclusion: We provide several lines of evidence for the involvement of SLC5A1 and SLC5A3 in GBM cell migration, thereby complementing the migration-associated transportome. Our findings suggest that SLC inhibition is a promising approach to GBM treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Brain Tumor Microenvironment)
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