Special Issue "Meningioma: Genomic Discoveries and Recent Therapeutic Advances "

A special issue of Cancers (ISSN 2072-6694).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 November 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Hiroaki Wakimoto
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Neurosurgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215, USA
Interests: neuro-oncology; glioblastoma; meningioma; oncolytic virus; herpes simplex virus; gene therapy
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Tareq A. Juratli

Guest Editor
Department of Neurosurgery, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technischen Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany
Translational Neuro-Oncology Laboratory, Department of Neurosurgery, Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Interests: central nervous system tumors; meningioma; glioma; genomics and personilized medicine; biomarkers; drug discovery

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Meningioma are the most common primary intracranial tumor, representing up to 35% of all central nervous system neoplasms. Initial standard-of-care therapy for meningioma is surgical resection, followed by radiation in recurrent, atypical, or malignant meningioma. Nevertheless, the post-treatment clinical course of the disease is remarkably heterogeneous; while most low-grade meningiomas do not recur after resection, recurrence in atypical and anaplastic meningioma is frequent.

The evidence base for traditional chemotherapeutics is poor, and securing durable, long-term disease control in this setting has been challenging. Therefore, there is an unmet need to better identify patients who are at risk to develop progressive meningioma with an aggressive clinical course. Recent genomic and epigenmoic discoveries have provided us with an improved understanding of the molecular drivers in meningioma and novel approaches to their treatment, while also redefining the role of genomic screening for meningioma classification and prognostic stratification. On the other hand, the role of the tumor microenvironment and immune surveilance in meningioma biology is poorly understood.

This Special Issue therefore covers new original research articles and timely reviews from experts in the field of menigioma in basic, translational, and clinical research arenas. Emphasis will be on genomic discoveries and recent therapeutic advancements in meningioma. However, cutting-edge research in other areas, such as novel biomarkers, diagnostic modalities, the tumor microenvironment, and immunology, is also welcome.

Dr. Hiroaki Wakimoto
Dr. Tareq A. Juratli
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cancers is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Meningioma
  • classification
  • genomics
  • epigenomics
  • biomarkers
  • molecular targets
  • surgery
  • radiation
  • targeted therapy
  • immunotherapy

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Protein Kinase A Distribution in Meningioma
Cancers 2019, 11(11), 1686; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers11111686 - 29 Oct 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Deregulation of intracellular signal transduction pathways is a hallmark of cancer cells, clearly differentiating them from healthy cells. Differential intracellular distribution of the cAMP-dependent protein kinases (PKA) was previously detected in cell cultures and in vivo in glioblastoma and medulloblastoma. Our goal is [...] Read more.
Deregulation of intracellular signal transduction pathways is a hallmark of cancer cells, clearly differentiating them from healthy cells. Differential intracellular distribution of the cAMP-dependent protein kinases (PKA) was previously detected in cell cultures and in vivo in glioblastoma and medulloblastoma. Our goal is to extend this observation to meningioma, to explore possible differences among tumors of different origins and prospective outcomes. The distribution of regulatory and catalytic subunits of PKA has been examined in tissue specimens obtained during surgery from meningioma patients. PKA RI subunit appeared more evenly distributed throughout the cytoplasm, but it was clearly detectable only in some tumors. RII was present in discrete spots, presumably at high local concentration; these aggregates could also be visualized under equilibrium binding conditions with fluorescent 8-substituted cAMP analogues, at variance with normal brain tissue and other brain tumors. The PKA catalytic subunit showed exactly overlapping pattern to RII and in fixed sections could be visualized by fluorescent cAMP analogues. Gene expression analysis showed that the PKA catalytic subunit revealed a significant correlation pattern with genes involved in meningioma. Hence, meningioma patients show a distinctive distribution pattern of PKA regulatory and catalytic subunits, different from glioblastoma, medulloblastoma, and healthy brain tissue. These observations raise the possibility of exploiting the PKA intracellular pathway as a diagnostic tool and possible therapeutic interventions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Meningioma: Genomic Discoveries and Recent Therapeutic Advances )
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Boron Neutron Capture Therapy and Photodynamic Therapy for High-Grade Meningiomas
Cancers 2020, 12(5), 1334; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12051334 - 23 May 2020
Abstract
Meningiomas are the most common type of intracranial brain tumors in adults. The majority of meningiomas are benign with a low risk of recurrence after resection. However, meningiomas defined as grades II or III, according to the 2016 World Health Organization (WHO) classification, [...] Read more.
Meningiomas are the most common type of intracranial brain tumors in adults. The majority of meningiomas are benign with a low risk of recurrence after resection. However, meningiomas defined as grades II or III, according to the 2016 World Health Organization (WHO) classification, termed high-grade meningiomas, frequently recur, even after gross total resection with or without adjuvant radiotherapy. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) are novel treatment modalities for malignant brain tumors, represented by glioblastomas. Although BNCT is based on a nuclear reaction and PDT uses a photochemical reaction, both of these therapies result in cellular damage to only the tumor cells. The aim of this literature review is to investigate the possibility and efficacy of BNCT and PDT as novel treatment modalities for high-grade meningiomas. The present review was conducted by searching PubMed and Scopus databases. The search was conducted in December 2019. Early clinical studies of BNCT have demonstrated activity for high-grade meningiomas, and a phase II clinical trial is in progress in Japan. As for PDT, studies have investigated the effect of PDT in malignant meningioma cell lines to establish PDT as a treatment for malignant meningiomas. Further laboratory research combined with proper controlled trials investigating the effects of these therapies is warranted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Meningioma: Genomic Discoveries and Recent Therapeutic Advances )
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