Connecting the Dots between Breast Cancer and Metabolic Health: Lifestyle, Genetic and Epigenetics

A special issue of Cancers (ISSN 2072-6694). This special issue belongs to the section "Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 July 2023) | Viewed by 1954

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public health, The University of Illinois, 1603 W. Taylor St., Chicago, IL 60612, USA
Interests: breast cancer; glucocorticoid receptor; immunohistochemical staining; racial disparity; allergy hiv

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Guest Editor
Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism, College of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612, USA
Interests: cardiovascular disease; obesity; diabetes; metabolic disease; vascular biology; exercise physiology; molecular biology; pathology; nutrition; epigenetics; translational research; dietary interventions; biomarkers; chemoprevention; cancer biology; racial disparity; clinical trials
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Despite the progress achieved in diagnosis and treatments, breast cancer remains the second leading cause of death in women globally. There appears to be an association between metabolic health and breast cancer. There is no universal definition for a metabolically unhealthy phenotype; however, it is usually defined as the presence of metabolic risk factors for chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Metabolic health perturbations, influenced by lifestyle, genetic and epigenetic factors, share several molecular pathways associated with breast cancer. This Special Issue of Cancers aims to collect reviews and original research articles pertaining to the impact of metabolic perturbations on the pathogenesis and outcomes of breast cancer, as well as research exploring the influence of cancer treatments on metabolism. 

Dr. Umaima Al-Alem
Dr. Abeer M. Mahmoud
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • breast cancer
  • metabolic health
  • lifestyle
  • genetic polymorphism
  • epigenetic
  • cancer treatment

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

19 pages, 286 KiB  
Review
Common Misconceptions about Diet and Breast Cancer: An Unclear Issue to Dispel
by Anastasia Lalioti, Laura Verzeletti, Paola Tiberio, Riccardo Gerosa, Mariangela Gaudio, Giuseppe Saltalamacchia, Manuela Pastore, Alberto Zambelli, Armando Santoro and Rita De Sanctis
Cancers 2024, 16(2), 306; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers16020306 - 11 Jan 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1511
Abstract
Breast cancer (BC) constitutes a prevalent health condition among women. Recent years have witnessed the identification of dietary proto-oncogenic factors that deserve attention. Besides the well-known role of alcohol and red and processed meat in BC development, the impact of other dietary components [...] Read more.
Breast cancer (BC) constitutes a prevalent health condition among women. Recent years have witnessed the identification of dietary proto-oncogenic factors that deserve attention. Besides the well-known role of alcohol and red and processed meat in BC development, the impact of other dietary components remains unclear. Our narrative review aims to explore the diet-BC relationship, focusing on sugar, dairy, and soy consumption. We conducted a PubMed literature search covering the last decade (2013–2023) and included 35 papers. We found limited evidence on the association between high sugar intake and BC incidence. On the other hand, dairy and soy consumption displayed a protective effect in the majority of the analyzed papers. However, a significant degree of heterogeneity was reported among the results. Menopausal status and the specific BC molecular subtypes were the main factors influencing the interpretation of the results. Exploring dietary factors and BC revealed inconsistencies: high glycemic index post-menopause may be a risk factor, while sugar-sweetened drinks and artificial sweeteners yielded conflicting results; fermented dairy showed potential benefits, non-fermented dairy presented inconsistent findings; soy impact on BC varied according to molecular subtype, with some studies suggesting a positive association in luminal-like BC. Hence, further investigation is crucial to obtain a uniform consensus on the diet-BC relationship. Full article
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