Steel-Concrete Composite Structures: Design and Construction

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309). This special issue belongs to the section "Building Structures".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2023) | Viewed by 23542

Special Issue Editors

Department of Civil Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong
Interests: steel-concrete composite structures; constitutive models; finite element; deep learning; physics-informed machine learning
Department of Civil Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China
Interests: steel-concrete composite structures; structural dynamics and vibration control; finite element constitutive and numerical methods; fabricated composite structures
School of Civil and Resource Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083, China
Interests: steel-concrete composite structures; prefabricated structures; composite structural systems; seismic analysis; efficient numerical modelling; intelligent construction

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Civil Engineering, North China University of Technology, Beijing 100144, China
Interests: steel-concrete composite structures; design methods; finite element analysis; machine learning; compressive membrane action

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Steel-concrete composite structures have shown promising mechanical performance, with improved construction speed and reduced material consumption. Therefore, steel-concrete composite structures may well suit the requirement of low-carbon construction, and may notably mitigate damage due to natural hazards. Recently, modern steel-concrete composite structures have been extensively studied and adopted for high-rise buildings, long-span bridges, long tunnels, and other complicated structures. Novel and innovative strategies for efficient design and rapid construction of steel-concrete composite structures are urgently needed. This Special Issue plans to give an overview of the most recent innovations and advances in the field of steel-concrete composite structures and their applications in diverse areas and countries. This Special Issue is aimed at providing selected contributions to advances in the design, construction, simulation, and maintenance of composite structures.

Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Composite beams, columns, and shear walls;
  • Composite structural systems;
  • Application of high-performance materials in composite structures;
  • Simulation of composite structures;
  • Design methodology of composite structures;
  • Construction methods of composite structures;
  • Structural health monitoring of composite structures;
  • Infusing machine learning with composite construction.

Dr. Jiaji Wang
Dr. Xin Nie
Dr. He Zhao
Dr. Yingjie Zhu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Buildings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • steel-concrete composite structures
  • composite beams/columns
  • composite walls
  • composite structural systems
  • design
  • construction
  • structural health monitoring

Published Papers (13 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

19 pages, 6347 KiB  
Article
Numerical Investigation of the Ultimate Load-Carrying Capacity of Square Concrete-Filled Steel Tube Columns Considering Initial Stresses Generated during Construction
by Huizhong Xue, Kaozhong Zhao, Fengmin Xia, Guangyi Wang and Ao Shen
Buildings 2023, 13(11), 2830; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13112830 - 11 Nov 2023
Viewed by 662
Abstract
During construction, newly cast concrete exerts lateral pressure on the steel plates of concrete-filled steel tube (CFST) columns, resulting in non-negligible initial circumferential stresses. Finite element analysis, in which lateral pressure is applied using a user-defined load subroutine, was conducted to comprehensively investigate [...] Read more.
During construction, newly cast concrete exerts lateral pressure on the steel plates of concrete-filled steel tube (CFST) columns, resulting in non-negligible initial circumferential stresses. Finite element analysis, in which lateral pressure is applied using a user-defined load subroutine, was conducted to comprehensively investigate the effects of initial stresses, including circumferential stresses, on the structural behaviors of a square CFST column under the action of compressive load. This study also provides guidance for the numerical simulation of CFST columns under complicated construction scenarios. The analysis revealed that the steel tube plates were more sensitive to lateral pressure, which should be limited during construction, compared with gravity loads. Under the action of compressive load, the presence of initial stresses altered the failure modes of the square CFST columns and reduced their ultimate load-carrying capacities (ULCCs). For columns with slenderness ratios of 18 and 37, the ULCCs were essentially inversely proportional to the initial stress ratio β, ranging from 0.1 to 0.5. However, for columns with a larger slenderness ratio of 55, the initial stress level did not influence their ULCCs. Finally, a simple method for calculating the ULCCs of square CFST columns considering initial stresses is proposed for design purposes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Steel-Concrete Composite Structures: Design and Construction)
Show Figures

Figure 1

17 pages, 7783 KiB  
Article
Parameter Selection for Concrete Constitutive Models in Finite Element Analysis of Composite Columns
by Kamel A. Bilal, Mustafa Mahamid, M. Amin Hariri-Ardebili, Cenk Tort and Travis Ford
Buildings 2023, 13(7), 1759; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13071759 - 11 Jul 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1800
Abstract
Concrete, as a complex and anisotropic material, poses challenges in accurately simulating its behavior in numerical simulations. This paper focuses on selecting an appropriate constitutive model for simulating the behavior of a steel–concrete composite column using finite element analysis under compression and push-out [...] Read more.
Concrete, as a complex and anisotropic material, poses challenges in accurately simulating its behavior in numerical simulations. This paper focuses on selecting an appropriate constitutive model for simulating the behavior of a steel–concrete composite column using finite element analysis under compression and push-out tests. Two models are analyzed and compared, namely, Drucker–Prager and concrete damage plasticity. The results demonstrate that the concrete damage plasticity model outperforms the Drucker–Prager model in all six test cases, indicating its superior accuracy in capturing the composite column’s behavior. This study enhances the reliability of numerical simulations for steel–concrete composite structures by choosing the most suitable constitutive model, parallel with extensive sensitivity analysis and model calibration. The findings emphasize the significance of meticulous model selection and precise parameter definition for achieving accurate predictions of concrete behavior. This research contributes to advancing the understanding and modeling of concrete’s intricate behavior in structural analyses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Steel-Concrete Composite Structures: Design and Construction)
Show Figures

Figure 1

22 pages, 5209 KiB  
Article
Time-Varying Evolution Behaviors of Steel–Concrete Composite Girders with Differentiated Connectors
by Yingjie Zhu, Liying Chen, Chen Wang, Cheng Liu and Zhengyuan Li
Buildings 2023, 13(5), 1137; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13051137 - 24 Apr 2023
Viewed by 1089
Abstract
To improve the cracking resistance of a concrete slab in the hogging moment region, a new concept called uplift-restricted and slip-permitted (URSP) connection technology has been proposed. Several studies have been conducted on URSP connectors, but investigations into the time-varying evolution behaviors of [...] Read more.
To improve the cracking resistance of a concrete slab in the hogging moment region, a new concept called uplift-restricted and slip-permitted (URSP) connection technology has been proposed. Several studies have been conducted on URSP connectors, but investigations into the time-varying evolution behaviors of composite beams with URSP connectors are still lacking. In this paper, three types of elaborate finite element models of composite girders with differentiated connectors and different construction methods were established. Simulation of the concrete shrinkage and creep effect was realized using a user subroutine based on an improved rate-type formulation. The performances of the composite girders in three schemes were analyzed and compared in both the construction and service stages. The results demonstrated that the URSP connection technique can effectively increase the prestressing efficiency and decrease the tensile stress of the concrete induced by dead loads and vehicle loads. With an increasing service time, the concrete shrinkage effect will enhance the advantage of the URSP connection technique, and the creep effect will reduce this advantage. Finally, parametric analyses were conducted, and a value of 0.2 is recommended for the URSP length ratio to promote practical applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Steel-Concrete Composite Structures: Design and Construction)
Show Figures

Figure 1

35 pages, 7347 KiB  
Article
Theoretical and Numerical Investigation of Damage Sensitivity of Steel–Concrete Composite Beam Bridges
by Zhibo Guo, Jianqing Bu, Jiren Zhang, Wenlong Cao and Xiaoming Huang
Buildings 2023, 13(5), 1109; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13051109 - 22 Apr 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1109
Abstract
To investigate the sensitivity of the overall mechanical performance of steel–concrete composite beam bridges (SCCBBs) to different types of damage, this paper proposes a method of analyzing the sensitivity of SCCBBs to damage based on the extremely randomized trees (ET) algorithm in machine [...] Read more.
To investigate the sensitivity of the overall mechanical performance of steel–concrete composite beam bridges (SCCBBs) to different types of damage, this paper proposes a method of analyzing the sensitivity of SCCBBs to damage based on the extremely randomized trees (ET) algorithm in machine learning. A steel–concrete composite continuous beam bridge was used as the engineering basis, and the finite element method was used to analyze the changes in the static and dynamic response of the bridge caused by seven types of damage. The proposed SCCBB damage sensitivity analysis theory was used to explore the sensitivity factors of the seven types of damage. The results show that microcracks in steel beams have the most significant impact on the mechanical performance sensitivity of SCCBBs, followed by the concrete slab stiffness degradation and bridge deck breakage. The sensitivity of the damage caused by transverse diaphragms and bridge pier stiffness degradation is relatively low, while the sensitivity of stud fractures and bearing damage is minimal. The impact factors of damage sensitivity were 0.51, 0.19, 0.13, 0.08, 0.05, 0.03 and 0.01. This research can provide a reference for the damage classification of SCCBBs with multiple damage interlacing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Steel-Concrete Composite Structures: Design and Construction)
Show Figures

Figure 1

18 pages, 5075 KiB  
Article
Experimental Research on the Mechanical Properties of MURSP-Type Steel-Concrete Composite Beams in Negative-Moment Region
by Jianqing Bu, Wenlong Cao, Xueyan Wang and Lianpeng Zhang
Buildings 2023, 13(4), 1095; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13041095 - 21 Apr 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1252
Abstract
To verify the effectiveness of uplift-restricted and slip-permitted (URSP) connectors in alleviating crack formation in the negative-moment region of steel-concrete composite beams (SCCBs) and improve the engineering adaptability of URSP connectors, this paper proposes a modified uplift-restricted and slip-permitted (MURSP) connector. Static load [...] Read more.
To verify the effectiveness of uplift-restricted and slip-permitted (URSP) connectors in alleviating crack formation in the negative-moment region of steel-concrete composite beams (SCCBs) and improve the engineering adaptability of URSP connectors, this paper proposes a modified uplift-restricted and slip-permitted (MURSP) connector. Static load tests and theoretical analysis were conducted on two overhanging beams with MURSP connectors and ordinary studs to analyze the influence of different stud forms on the deflection, crack, and slip of SCCBs in the negative-moment region. Finally, a nonlinear finite element modeling method for MURSP-type steel-concrete composite beams was developed, and a finite element model was established. The results showed that the use of MURSP connectors could effectively alleviate the concrete cracking problem in the negative-moment zone of SCCBs. Compared with the common stud SCCB, the crack load of the MURSP-type SCCB was higher, the maximum crack width was lower, and the crack distribution was more uniform; however, the overall flexural stiffness of the overhanging beam with MURSP connectors was reduced by 3.08%. The interface slip of the overhanging beam with the MURSP connectors increased suddenly in the initial stage of loading, whereas the increase was more gradual in the later stage. The SCCB model established in this study was in good agreement with the results of experimental beams. The finite element analysis results showed that the ordinary stud and MURSP connector exhibited different stress and deformation states in the negative-moment region of SCCBs, and the deformation states changed from bending type to shear type. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Steel-Concrete Composite Structures: Design and Construction)
Show Figures

Figure 1

21 pages, 8841 KiB  
Article
Prestressed Steel-Concrete Composite I-Beams with Single and Double Corrugated Web
by Mahmoud T. Nawar, Ayman El-Zohairy, Hassan M. Maaly, Mohammed Husain, Islam Salama and Eslam Mousa
Buildings 2023, 13(3), 647; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13030647 - 28 Feb 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2442
Abstract
Composite steel girders with concrete have been used for many years and advances in structural and fabrication technology have established their optimization. One of the changes in structural steel I-beams during the past few years has been the availability of web corrugation. The [...] Read more.
Composite steel girders with concrete have been used for many years and advances in structural and fabrication technology have established their optimization. One of the changes in structural steel I-beams during the past few years has been the availability of web corrugation. The economic design of steel girders normally requires thin webs. Moreover, using externally prestressed tendons as a strengthening technique controls deflections and stresses. However, this strengthening technique causes shear buckling of the steel beams. In this study, the flexural behavior of externally prestressed composite steel-concrete I-beams with a single and double corrugated web was experimentally and numerically investigated. Three simply supported prestressed steel-concrete composite I-beams with single corrugated web (SCW) and double corrugated web (DCW) were tested under four-point loading. The tested beams were externally prestressed by using straight tendons along the full length. The experimental results showed that using SCW was more efficient in shear buckling resistance than DCW with the same equivalent web thickness. The ABAQUAS package was used to simulate the nonlinear behavior of the tested beams. The developed model was validated against the experimental results to carry out a parametric study in order to investigate the effect of various parameters on the behavior of the composite beams with SCW and DCW. Using stiffeners at the loading points as deviators to maintain the prestressed tendon positions increased the beam capacity and improved the beam performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Steel-Concrete Composite Structures: Design and Construction)
Show Figures

Figure 1

21 pages, 8998 KiB  
Article
Numerical Investigation on the Pulling Resistant Capacity of Steel Beam-Concrete Wall Joints with T-stub Connectors
by He Zhao, Long-Hui Sun, Hong-Bing Chen and Xiao-Gang Liu
Buildings 2023, 13(2), 566; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13020566 - 19 Feb 2023
Viewed by 3258
Abstract
The steel frame-reinforced concrete core tube structural system is widely used in mid-rise and high-rise buildings due to its good seismic behaviour and high construction efficiency. Since the steel frame and the reinforced concrete core tube are supposed to deform synergistically under earthquake [...] Read more.
The steel frame-reinforced concrete core tube structural system is widely used in mid-rise and high-rise buildings due to its good seismic behaviour and high construction efficiency. Since the steel frame and the reinforced concrete core tube are supposed to deform synergistically under earthquake action, the steel beam-concrete wall joint (SBCW joint for short) will be subjected to a significant pull-out force. Therefore, the pulling resistant capacity of the SBCW joint is quite important for the seismic performance of the overall structure. In response to the shortages of the existing SBCW joint types, a new SBCW joint with a T-stub connector was proposed and studied. The experimental and analytical research has indicated that there are different failure modes and force mechanisms of the SBCW joint under pull-out load, and further studies are required for the pulling resistant capacity. On the basis of recent research findings, a numerical investigation on the pulling resistant capacity of the joint is conducted in this study. An elaborate 3D finite element model of the SBCW joint is proposed, and the load performance, strain and stress development, deformation characteristics and failure modes are analysed in detail. Then, a series of parametric analyses are carried out based on the finite element model, indicating that the length and the web height of the T-stub connector, the number of shear studs on the connector and the reinforcement ratio of stirrups have an obvious effect on the pulling resistant capacity. Finally, the critical value of the embedded depth of the connector, which is found to be one of the most important parameters for the failure mode and pulling resistant capacity of the joint, is determined, and design recommendations are proposed for the SBCW joints with T-stub connectors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Steel-Concrete Composite Structures: Design and Construction)
Show Figures

Figure 1

25 pages, 14640 KiB  
Article
Numerical Study on the Effect of Interface Dynamic Damage of Steel–Concrete Composite Beam Bridge Caused by High–Frequency Impact Load
by Guan-Yuan Zhao, Li Zhu, Wei Liu, Jia-Cheng Zhao and Jin-Xin Huo
Buildings 2023, 13(2), 545; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13020545 - 16 Feb 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1236
Abstract
The group studs arrangement is applied to prefabricated composite beams to significantly improve construction speed. However, contact vibration exists in the unconstrained interface area of the high-speed railway composite beam during the operation period, which degrades the connecting performance of the composite beam [...] Read more.
The group studs arrangement is applied to prefabricated composite beams to significantly improve construction speed. However, contact vibration exists in the unconstrained interface area of the high-speed railway composite beam during the operation period, which degrades the connecting performance of the composite beam and adversely affects the overall structure. In this study, finite element simulations of the vibration of concrete slabs and steel beams in the unconstrained interface area were carried out to obtain finite element models with damage. The effects of vibration damage on the degradation of the studs were investigated by push-out and pull-out tests using finite element simulation of the local specimen model. The macroscopic ontological models of the undamaged and previously damaged group studs were obtained. Compared with the specimen without damage, the ultimate bearing capacity of the pushed-out specimen with damage decreased by 24.8%; the ultimate slip decreased by 15%; and the stiffness decreased by 12.8%. The behavior of the pulled-out specimen with damage was almost the same as that of the specimen without damage. On this basis, a finite element model of the train–track–composite beam coupling system was established. The influence of the degradation of the connection on the coupling system with 300 km/h, 330 km/h, and 360 km/h train speeds was analyzed under the conditions of single-train driving and a two-train rendezvous. In the case of single-train travel, compared with the undamaged composite beam, the mid-span vertical displacements of the composite beams with damage increased by 13%, 8.38%, and 6.2% for train speeds of 360 km/h, 330 km/h, and 300 km/h, respectively; the transverse displacements increased by 24.2%, 15%, and 9.2%, respectively. In the case of a two-train rendezvous, the mid-span vertical displacements increased by 8.8%, 13.7%, and 12.8%, respectively; the transverse displacements increased by 26.4%, 53%, and 24.8%, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Steel-Concrete Composite Structures: Design and Construction)
Show Figures

Figure 1

19 pages, 8263 KiB  
Article
Experimental and Numerical Investigation of the Cross-Sectional Mechanical Behavior of a Steel–Concrete Immersed Tube Tunnel
by Yao-Yu Zhu, Shen-You Song, Wei Liu, Ya-Wei Guo, Li Zhu and Jia-Xin Li
Buildings 2022, 12(10), 1553; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings12101553 - 28 Sep 2022
Viewed by 1365
Abstract
This paper presents a proposed static test and numerical study on the mechanical properties of steel-shell–concrete-structure-immersed tunnel nodes, which is used to investigate the seismic performance and damage mechanism of steel-shell–concrete-structure-immersed tunnel nodes. The test is based on the immersed tube tunnel project [...] Read more.
This paper presents a proposed static test and numerical study on the mechanical properties of steel-shell–concrete-structure-immersed tunnel nodes, which is used to investigate the seismic performance and damage mechanism of steel-shell–concrete-structure-immersed tunnel nodes. The test is based on the immersed tube tunnel project in the deep China channel, and the nodes representing the outermost and innermost vertical walls of the immersed tube tunnel, i.e., L-shaped and T-shaped node specimens, were designed and fabricated at a scale of 1:5, and the specimens were mainly subjected to the combined effect of vertical axial compression and lateral displacement loads. The test results show that the L-shaped node will exhibit brittle damage characteristics with high lateral load carrying capacity and energy dissipation capacity during the ultimate load phase, while the T-shaped node exhibits bending damage with better ductility, so the outermost vertical wall should be locally reinforced to ensure the necessary ductility of the structure in the actual project. In addition, by comparing the numerical calculation and experimental results, it is found that there is good agreement in terms of load–displacement curves and crack distribution, which shows that the modeling method proposed in this paper can accurately simulate the mechanical properties of immersed tunnel nodes and can guide the section design of immersed tunnels with steel shell–concrete structures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Steel-Concrete Composite Structures: Design and Construction)
Show Figures

Figure 1

20 pages, 5233 KiB  
Article
Dynamic Analysis of a Steel–Concrete Composite Box-Girder Bridge–Train Coupling System Considering Slip, Shear-Lag and Time-Dependent Effects
by Ce Gao, Li Zhu, Bing Han, Qing-Chen Tang and Rui Su
Buildings 2022, 12(9), 1389; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings12091389 - 05 Sep 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1214
Abstract
A dynamic computational program considering slip, shear-lag and time-dependent effects of composite box-girder bridge–train coupling system is firstly proposed based on the authors’ previous studies. In the program, the long-term vertical displacement of a composite bridge is firstly calculated. The calculated vertical displacement [...] Read more.
A dynamic computational program considering slip, shear-lag and time-dependent effects of composite box-girder bridge–train coupling system is firstly proposed based on the authors’ previous studies. In the program, the long-term vertical displacement of a composite bridge is firstly calculated. The calculated vertical displacement is then superimposed on the existing uneven track as the new excitation of the composite box-girder bridge–train coupling system to obtain the dynamic responses of the bridge–train coupling system. A 3 × 40 m simply supported steel–concrete composite box-girder bridge is selected to investigate the influence of its time-dependent behavior on its dynamic responses. The results showed that the time-dependent effect will amplify the dynamic characteristics of the composite box-girder bridge and the high-speed train. The maximum vertical displacement and acceleration of the composite bridge increase by 8.82% and 13.64%, and the maximum vertical acceleration of the train body increases by 144.78%. Additionally, the slip and shear-lag effects have an impact on the dynamic responses of the composite box-girder bridge–train coupling system at different operation times. The dynamic responses of the coupling system strengthen with the decrease in shear connection stiffness. The dynamic responses of the system may be underestimated when the shear-lag effect is not neglected. Therefore, these conclusions should be given sufficient attention in the design, construction and operation of high-speed railway composite bridges. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Steel-Concrete Composite Structures: Design and Construction)
Show Figures

Figure 1

23 pages, 10705 KiB  
Article
Numerical Study on the Seismic Behavior of Eccentrically Braced Composite Frames with a Vertical Low-Yield-Point Steel Shear Link
by Liang-Dong Zhuang and Ji-Zhi Zhao
Buildings 2022, 12(9), 1359; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings12091359 - 01 Sep 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1511
Abstract
An eccentrically braced composite frame with a low-yield-point (LYP) steel shear link is an efficient energy dissipation system that exhibits good mechanical properties. However, existing experimental studies have not fully demonstrated the superiority and applicability of the structural system. We present a structural [...] Read more.
An eccentrically braced composite frame with a low-yield-point (LYP) steel shear link is an efficient energy dissipation system that exhibits good mechanical properties. However, existing experimental studies have not fully demonstrated the superiority and applicability of the structural system. We present a structural mechanics and finite element model analysis of an eccentrically braced composite frame with a vertical shear link. The effect of the design parameters on the seismic performance of the structure is analyzed. First, a theoretical model of the mechanics of the structural system is established to provide a comprehensive description of the key parameters. Then, a finite element model is developed using the computer program ABAQUS to analyze the mechanical and energy dissipation mechanisms. Finally, the beam-to-column stiffness ratio, shear link web thickness, shear link web width and length, and diagonal brace stiffness are analyzed to determine their effects on the mechanical properties of the structural system. Furthermore, some design parameter values are suggested. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Steel-Concrete Composite Structures: Design and Construction)
Show Figures

Figure 1

24 pages, 13722 KiB  
Article
Experimental Study on the Seismic Behavior of Squat SRC Shear Walls with High Axial Load Ratio
by Lei Zhang, Xiaolei Han, Xijun Chen and Jing Ji
Buildings 2022, 12(8), 1238; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings12081238 - 14 Aug 2022
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1885
Abstract
This paper aims to study the seismic behavior of squat steel-reinforced concrete (SRC) shear walls with a high axial load ratio. Nine squat SRC shear walls with varying axial load ratios, steel ratios, and horizontal distributed reinforcement ratios were tested under lateral cyclic [...] Read more.
This paper aims to study the seismic behavior of squat steel-reinforced concrete (SRC) shear walls with a high axial load ratio. Nine squat SRC shear walls with varying axial load ratios, steel ratios, and horizontal distributed reinforcement ratios were tested under lateral cyclic reversed loading and an axial load. The failure process, load-deformation hysteretic response, shear strength, ductility, and the strain of the specimens are reported. The results show that all the specimens failed in shear with the crushing of the web concrete. No axial failure occurred after the web concrete was crushed since the boundary elements encased with structural steel sections maintained the axial load. Larger steel ratios reduced the buckling degree of the structural steel. A larger horizontal distributed reinforcement ratio was clearly beneficial for the ductility and energy dissipation capacity of the specimen, while it had a negligible effect on the shear strength. The Chinese code provided an extremely conservative prediction of the shear strength of the tested squat SRC shear walls with a mean calculated-experimental strength ratio of 0.42. An improved formula was established mainly by the modification of the shear resistance contributed by the concrete and the structural steel, leading to a mean calculated-experimental strength ratio of 0.74. More experimental data are still needed to establish more accurate deformation acceptance criteria for SRC shear walls and to promote the performance-based seismic evaluation of SRC structures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Steel-Concrete Composite Structures: Design and Construction)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

22 pages, 4795 KiB  
Review
A Beam Finite Element Model Considering the Slip, Shear Lag, and Time-Dependent Effects of Steel–Concrete Composite Box Beams
by Guan-Yuan Zhao, Wei Liu, Rui Su and Jia-Cheng Zhao
Buildings 2023, 13(1), 215; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13010215 - 12 Jan 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1501
Abstract
A beam finite element model considering the slip, shear lag, and time-dependent effects of steel–concrete composite box beams have been proposed in this study. The element is employed to a one-dimensional analytical method that is solved involving an expression of spatial and time-dependent [...] Read more.
A beam finite element model considering the slip, shear lag, and time-dependent effects of steel–concrete composite box beams have been proposed in this study. The element is employed to a one-dimensional analytical method that is solved involving an expression of spatial and time-dependent variables. A step-by-step method that does not involve storing the stress and strain histories, which is more accurate than the single-step algebraic method, is employed to solve the time variables. A recursive method was elaborated to determine spatial and time-dependent variables through the above method. The validity of the proposed method in instantaneous analysis is attested by the numerical data of the elaborate finite element model established in a commercial software, ANSYS, and that of the time-dependent analysis is verified by the existing test results on the long-term performance of composite beams. The proposed beam finite element model is applied to predict the time-related behavior of simply supported composite beams after validation. The results show that concrete shrinkage and creep significantly influence the structural responses of the composite box beams. From the initial load on the 28th day to that in the 3rd year, the vertical deflection at the cross-section of the mid-span increased by 47.01%. The interface slip at the end increased by −10.99%. The warping intensity function of the concrete slab and the steel beam at the end caused by shear lag increased by 111.64% and 7.01%, respectively. The maximum compressive stress on the concrete slab and the maximum tensile stress at the steel bottom flange increased by −6.75% and 4.56%, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Steel-Concrete Composite Structures: Design and Construction)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop