The Role of Sounds and Music in Emotion and Cognition

A special issue of Brain Sciences (ISSN 2076-3425). This special issue belongs to the section "Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2023) | Viewed by 13460

Special Issue Editors

Department of Biotechnological and Applied Clinical Sciences, University of L’Aquila, L’Aquila, Italy
Interests: creativity; divergent thinking, imagery; individual differences; spatial cognition; emotions
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Department of Psychology, University of Bologna, Viale Berti Pichat 5, 40127 Bologna, Italy
Interests: individual differences; navigational memory; topographical memory; environmental memory; witnessing and reasoning
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is a common experience that sounds (both environmental and artificial) and music capture our attention and can yield negative or positive emotions as well as can affect cognition in terms of attention, memory, problem solving, decision making, creativity, and so forth.  Several studies demonstrated that the way by which auditory stimuli affect directly emotion or cognition depends on the property of stimuli, the nature of tasks and on individual differences in processing sounds and music. This evidence certainly has interesting practical implications, e.g., individuals with ADHD are much more vulnerable to the effects of irrelevant sounds and their performance worsens, or certain types of music induce consumers to buy more, or club patrons to consume more alcohol. In this vein, auditory stimuli can also yield positive and negative emotions, that in turn negatively or positively affect cognition and behavior. For example, different studies reported both positive and negative effects of emotions inducted by music on creativity and visuo-spatial memory tasks.

The present Special Issue shows a great interest in studies focusing on different effects of auditory stimuli on the variety facets of both emotion and cognition. Thus, we welcome all articles, literature reviews and meta-analyses that help to understand the beneficial or negative effects of auditory stimuli (environmental and artificial sounds and music) on both emotion and cognition, as well as the key role of auditory stimuli in the interplay between emotion and cognition. Both theoretical and applied contributions are also appreciated. Yet, studies comparing special groups of individuals in normal and pathological conditions (e.g., artists, patients with dementia, children with ADHD, patients with brain-damaged or psychiatric disorders and so forth) are desirable.  Further, a potential topic includes also the role played by ageing in perceiving auditory stimuli and by consequence how these age-related changes affect emotion and cognition in older people.  Not least, functional imaging methods allowing comparative investigation of neurobehavioral, neuroanatomy and neurophysiology pertaining to the relationship between auditory stimuli and emotion and cognition are also welcome.

Dr. Laura Piccardi
Dr. Massimiliano Palmiero
Dr. Raffaella Nori
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Brain Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sounds
  • irrelevant auditory stimuli
  • music
  • emotion
  • mood
  • feelings
  • cognition
  • auditory distraction
  • acoustic signals
  • spatial cognition
  • memory

Published Papers (7 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Editorial

Jump to: Research, Review

3 pages, 170 KiB  
Editorial
The Role of Sounds and Music in Emotion and Cognition
Brain Sci. 2024, 14(3), 192; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci14030192 - 21 Feb 2024
Viewed by 442
Abstract
It is widely agreed upon that both natural and man-made sounds, including music, profoundly impact our emotions and cognitive abilities, such as our attention, memory, problem-solving, decision-making, and creativity [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Role of Sounds and Music in Emotion and Cognition)

Research

Jump to: Editorial, Review

11 pages, 865 KiB  
Article
The Association between Working Memory and Divergent Thinking: The Moderating Role of Formal Musical Background
Brain Sci. 2024, 14(1), 61; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci14010061 - 08 Jan 2024
Viewed by 2579
Abstract
Divergent thinking (DT) is widely considered an essential cognitive dimension of creativity, which involves goal-oriented processes, including working memory (WM), which allows for retrieving and loading of information into the attentional stream and, consequently, enhancing divergence of thinking. Despite the critical role of [...] Read more.
Divergent thinking (DT) is widely considered an essential cognitive dimension of creativity, which involves goal-oriented processes, including working memory (WM), which allows for retrieving and loading of information into the attentional stream and, consequently, enhancing divergence of thinking. Despite the critical role of WM in DT, little work has been done on the mechanism affecting this interplay. The current study addressed the involvement of a formal musical background in the relationship between WM and DT and was conducted with 83 healthy young adults (M = 19.64 years; SD = 0.52 years; 33 females). The participants were requested to indicate if they had a formal background in music in the conservatory (M = 4.78 years; SD = 5.50 years) as well as perform the digit span forward test (DSFT) and the alternative uses task—AUT from the Torrance test of creative thinking (TTCT). The results indicated that years of formal musical background moderated the association between WM and DT. These findings suggest that music enhances the positive effect of high-order cognitive processes, such as WM, on the ability to think divergently. Theoretical and practical implications as well as limitations were discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Role of Sounds and Music in Emotion and Cognition)
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 2437 KiB  
Article
Electrophysiological Correlates of Vocal Emotional Processing in Musicians and Non-Musicians
Brain Sci. 2023, 13(11), 1563; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci13111563 - 07 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1005
Abstract
Musicians outperform non-musicians in vocal emotion recognition, but the underlying mechanisms are still debated. Behavioral measures highlight the importance of auditory sensitivity towards emotional voice cues. However, it remains unclear whether and how this group difference is reflected at the brain level. Here, [...] Read more.
Musicians outperform non-musicians in vocal emotion recognition, but the underlying mechanisms are still debated. Behavioral measures highlight the importance of auditory sensitivity towards emotional voice cues. However, it remains unclear whether and how this group difference is reflected at the brain level. Here, we compared event-related potentials (ERPs) to acoustically manipulated voices between musicians (n = 39) and non-musicians (n = 39). We used parameter-specific voice morphing to create and present vocal stimuli that conveyed happiness, fear, pleasure, or sadness, either in all acoustic cues or selectively in either pitch contour (F0) or timbre. Although the fronto-central P200 (150–250 ms) and N400 (300–500 ms) components were modulated by pitch and timbre, differences between musicians and non-musicians appeared only for a centro-parietal late positive potential (500–1000 ms). Thus, this study does not support an early auditory specialization in musicians but suggests instead that musicality affects the manner in which listeners use acoustic voice cues during later, controlled aspects of emotion evaluation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Role of Sounds and Music in Emotion and Cognition)
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 904 KiB  
Article
Person-Centred, Culturally Appropriate Music Intervention to Improve Psychological Wellbeing of Residents with Advanced Dementia Living in Australian Rural Residential Aged Care Homes
Brain Sci. 2023, 13(7), 1103; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci13071103 - 21 Jul 2023
Viewed by 1544
Abstract
This quasi-experimental, nonrandomized intervention study reports the effect of person-centred, culturally appropriate music on psychological wellbeing of residents with advanced dementia in five rural residential aged care homes in Australia. Seventy-four residents attended in person-centred music sessions and culturally appropriate group sessions. Interest, [...] Read more.
This quasi-experimental, nonrandomized intervention study reports the effect of person-centred, culturally appropriate music on psychological wellbeing of residents with advanced dementia in five rural residential aged care homes in Australia. Seventy-four residents attended in person-centred music sessions and culturally appropriate group sessions. Interest, response, initiation, involvement, enjoyment, and general reactions of the residents were assessed using the Music in Dementia Assessment Scale (MiDAS), and interviews and focus groups were conducted with aged care staff and musicians. The overall effect of person-centred sessions at two-time points were: during the intervention—351.2 (SD 93.5); and two-hours post intervention—315.1 (SD 98.5). The residents presented a moderate to high level of interest, response, initiation, involvement, and enjoyment during the session and at post-intervention. However, the MiDAS sub-categories’ mean scores differed between the time-points: interest (t59 = 2.8, p = 0.001); response (t59 = 2.9, p = 0.005); initiation (t59 = 2.4, p = 0.019); and involvement (t59 = 2.8, p = 0.007), indicating a significant decline in the effect of person-centred music over time. Interestingly, during the period of time, most of the residents were observed with no exhibitions of agitation (87.5%), low in mood (87.5%), and anxiousness (70.3%), and with a presentation of relaxation (75.5%), attentiveness (56.5%), and smiling (56.9%). Themes from qualitative data collected regarding culturally appropriate group music sessions were behavioural change, meaningful interaction, being initiative, increased participation, and contentment. The findings suggest that the integration of music into care plans may reduce the residents’ agitation and improve their emotional wellbeing in rural aged care homes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Role of Sounds and Music in Emotion and Cognition)
Show Figures

Figure 1

11 pages, 1104 KiB  
Article
The Effect of Sadness on Visual Artistic Creativity in Non-Artists
Brain Sci. 2023, 13(1), 149; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci13010149 - 15 Jan 2023
Viewed by 1883
Abstract
The study of the relationships between mood and creativity is long-standing. In this study, the effects of mood states on artistic creativity were investigated in ninety non-artist participants. Mood states were induced by instructing participants to listen to self-selected happy, sad, or neutral [...] Read more.
The study of the relationships between mood and creativity is long-standing. In this study, the effects of mood states on artistic creativity were investigated in ninety non-artist participants. Mood states were induced by instructing participants to listen to self-selected happy, sad, or neutral music for ten minutes. Then, all participants were asked to make two artistic drawings. To check for mood manipulation, the Profile of Mood States (POMS) was administered before and after listening to the self-selected music. After the mood induction, the negative group reported higher scores than the other two groups in the ‘depression’ subscale and lower scores than the other two groups in the ‘vigour’ subscale of the POMS; the positive mood group showed more vigour than the negative mood group. Yet, three independent judges assigned higher ratings of creativity and emotionality to the drawings produced by participants in the negative mood group than drawings produced by participants in the other two groups. These results confirmed that specific negative mood states (e.g., sadness) positively affect artistic creativity, probably because participants are more likely to engage in mood-repairing. Limitations and future research directions are presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Role of Sounds and Music in Emotion and Cognition)
Show Figures

Figure 1

12 pages, 1674 KiB  
Article
The Creative Drummer: An EEG-Based Pilot Study on the Correlates of Emotions and Creative Drum Playing
Brain Sci. 2023, 13(1), 88; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci13010088 - 02 Jan 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2241
Abstract
It is reasonable to assume that emotional processes are involved in creative tasks and the generation of creative ideas. In this pilot study, we investigate the emotional correlates in professional drummers during different degrees of creative music playing. Ten participants performed three tasks: [...] Read more.
It is reasonable to assume that emotional processes are involved in creative tasks and the generation of creative ideas. In this pilot study, we investigate the emotional correlates in professional drummers during different degrees of creative music playing. Ten participants performed three tasks: repetitive rhythmic drum playing, pattern-based improvisation, and attention-intensive free improvisation, while their EEG activity was recorded. Arousal and valence levels were estimated from the EEG data at baseline and for the three tasks. Results show significantly increased levels of valence (i.e., increased prefrontal right alpha power compared to prefrontal left alpha power) during pattern-based and free improvisation relative to baseline, and significantly increased levels of valence during free improvisation relative to pattern-based improvisation. These results seem to indicate that positive emotion (characterized as increased valence) is associated with the creation of original ideas in drum playing and that the freer the creative process, the greater the positive effect. The implication of these results may be of particular relevance in the fields of music-based therapeutic interventions and music pedagogy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Role of Sounds and Music in Emotion and Cognition)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Editorial, Research

23 pages, 1859 KiB  
Review
Cognitive Crescendo: How Music Shapes the Brain’s Structure and Function
Brain Sci. 2023, 13(10), 1390; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci13101390 - 29 Sep 2023
Viewed by 2144
Abstract
Music is a complex phenomenon with multiple brain areas and neural connections being implicated. Centuries ago, music was discovered as an efficient modality for psychological status enrichment and even for the treatment of multiple pathologies. Modern research investigations give a new avenue for [...] Read more.
Music is a complex phenomenon with multiple brain areas and neural connections being implicated. Centuries ago, music was discovered as an efficient modality for psychological status enrichment and even for the treatment of multiple pathologies. Modern research investigations give a new avenue for music perception and the understanding of the underlying neurological mechanisms, using neuroimaging, especially magnetic resonance imaging. Multiple brain areas were depicted in the last decades as being of high value for music processing, and further analyses in the neuropsychology field uncover the implications in emotional and cognitive activities. Music listening improves cognitive functions such as memory, attention span, and behavioral augmentation. In rehabilitation, music-based therapies have a high rate of success for the treatment of depression and anxiety and even in neurological disorders such as regaining the body integrity after a stroke episode. Our review focused on the neurological and psychological implications of music, as well as presenting the significant clinical relevance of therapies using music. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Role of Sounds and Music in Emotion and Cognition)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop