Special Issue "Structural Performances of Concrete Composite Members: Experimental, Theoretical, Numerical Approaches"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental and Sustainable Science and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 February 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Kang Su Kim
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Department of Architectural Engineering, University of Seoul, Seoul 02504, Republic of Korea
Interests: structural analysis and design of reinforced concrete (RC) and prestressed concrete (PSC) structures; application of composite members; remaining service life of concrete structures; finite element analysis; large-scale testing
Dr. Myoungsu (James) Shin
E-Mail
Guest Editor
School of Urban and Environmental Eng., Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 44919, Republic of Korea
Tel. 82-52-217-2814
Interests: seismic design; tall buildings; sustainable materials; ultrasonic technology
Prof. Dr. Kil-Hee Kim
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Architectural Engineering, Kongju National University, Chungnam, 31080, Republic of Korea
Interests: application of new materials for building structures; development of hybrid materials for building structures; seismic resistant design and retrofitting of building structures; structural reliability

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Recently, composite materials such as steel–concrete, FRP, and polypropylene or steel fibers have been widely applied to concrete members for enhancement of their flexural or shear performances, crack or deflection controllability, etc. In addition to composite materials, precast prestressed concrete members are also used to construct long-span structures, underground parking lots, large logistics warehouses, and other special structures, because of their excellent structural performances and efficient applicability. In this regard, this Special Issue invites original research articles dealing with experiments and theoretical or numerical modeling of structural behavior of concrete composite members that contribute to our understanding on their performances in more detail.

The scope of this Special Issue, “Structural Performances of Concrete Composite Members: Experimental, Theoretical, Numerical Approaches, covers every aspect of concrete composite members, including: The structural behavior of reinforced concrete members with FRP, polypropylene or steel fibers, steel–concrete composite members, precast/prestressed concrete members, composite behavior between precast concrete and cast-in-place concrete, etc.

Prof. Dr. Kang Su Kim
Dr. Myoungsu (James) Shin
Prof. Dr. Kil-Hee Kim
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Composite material
  • FRP
  • Fiber
  • Steel–concrete composite member
  • Precast concrete
  • Prestressed concrete
  • Structural analysis
  • Numerical modelling
  • Experiment
  • Strengthening method

Published Papers (9 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Stressing State Analysis of CFST Arch Supports in Deep Roadway Based on NSF Method
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(20), 4238; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9204238 - 10 Oct 2019
Abstract
This paper experimentally analyzes the working behavior characteristics of five concrete-filled steel tube (CFST) arch supports in deep roadway based on the numerical shape function (NSF) method and structural stressing state theory. First, the measured strain data are expanded by the NSF method [...] Read more.
This paper experimentally analyzes the working behavior characteristics of five concrete-filled steel tube (CFST) arch supports in deep roadway based on the numerical shape function (NSF) method and structural stressing state theory. First, the measured strain data are expanded by the NSF method and modeled as generalized strain energy density (GSED) to characterize the stressing state of the supports. Then, one of the supports is taken as an example and the Mann-Kendall (M-K) criterion is adopted to detect the mutation characteristics of the support, which derives the new definition of structural failure load. Correspondingly, the stressing state modes as well as strain and stress fields for the support are proposed to verify their mutation characteristics. Finally, the common and different characteristics of stressing state, damage development and internal forces for different supports are also summarized. The analytical results of the supports explore a new analysis method for underground structures and the unseen knowledge provides a reference to more rational future design. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Experimental Research on the Properties of Rock-Filled Concrete
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(18), 3767; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9183767 - 09 Sep 2019
Abstract
In order to comprehensively evaluate the properties of rock-filled concrete (RFC) with the strength of C15, lab experimental test and in-situ test are applied to explore the mechanical, hydraulic, ultrasonic characteristics of RFC in Hantang reservoir dam. Four types of defects within RFC [...] Read more.
In order to comprehensively evaluate the properties of rock-filled concrete (RFC) with the strength of C15, lab experimental test and in-situ test are applied to explore the mechanical, hydraulic, ultrasonic characteristics of RFC in Hantang reservoir dam. Four types of defects within RFC are shown from the appearance of borehole cores specimens: (1) large sized voids existing in interfacial transition zone (ITZ) between self-compacting concrete (SCC) and rock block (RB); (2) bad cohesion in ITZ; (3) joints within rock block; (4) voids within SCC. For hydraulic aspects, the average porosity of RFC is 14.10%; the permeability rate of RFC ranges from 2.41 Lu to 10.41 Lu, with the average of 11.32 Lu, occasionally more than 25.52 Lu due to interconnected defects. For ultrasonic aspects, the ultrasonic velocity of RFC conforms to lognormal distribution, with the average of 2993.3 m/s and standard deviation of 650.5 m/s. For mechanical aspects, the average cubic compressive strength of RFC is 22.55 Mpa, with the standard deviation of 4.09 Mp. Thus the data shows a relatively great dispersion due to uneven distribution of some defects in RFC, which deteriorate the quality of RFC. Through the experimental investigation, it is shown that the quality of massive RFC in the Hantang dam is obviously non-homogeneous, mainly influenced by construction technology. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Investigation of the Fatigue Behaviour of a Ballastless Slab Track–Bridge Structural System under Train Load
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(17), 3625; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9173625 - 03 Sep 2019
Abstract
To probe into the time-dependent behaviour of the ballastless track–bridge structural system under train load, based on the import of the static and fatigue damage constitutive model of materials to simulate damage deterioration of the structural system and interface cohesive zone model to [...] Read more.
To probe into the time-dependent behaviour of the ballastless track–bridge structural system under train load, based on the import of the static and fatigue damage constitutive model of materials to simulate damage deterioration of the structural system and interface cohesive zone model to the interface layer, a three-dimensional nonlinear finite element model of the China Railway Track System Type II (CRTS II) ballastless track–bridge structural system was established using the equivalent static method. Then, using this model, we developed the numerical simulation analysis of the influence law of material damage deterioration on structural system performance under train load and revealed the fatigue evolution of the structural system. The results show that the beam remains in compressed status for the whole process, the track is in compression in the midspan and in tension at the beam end, and the tensile stress is larger near the shear groove under the double-track static load. Under the fatigue load, stiffness degradation of the structural system is not obvious, and integral rigidity of the structural system is dependent on the rigidity of the beam. Strength reduction of the materials caused stress redistribution of the structural system and had a larger effect on the stress of each layer of track structure than on the stress on the beam. The fatigue degradation of the cement-emulsified asphalt (CA) mortar layer material has a significant impact on the structural system, which directly affects structural layer stress variation with the fatigue loading cycle. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Fatigue Cracking Resistance of Engineered Cementitious Composites (ECC) under Working Condition of Orthotropic Steel Bridge Decks Pavement
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(17), 3577; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9173577 - 01 Sep 2019
Abstract
In order to investigate the fatigue cracking resistance of engineered cementitious composites (ECC) used in in total life pavement, the semi-circular bending (SCB) test and improved three-point bending fatigue test (ITBF) were utilized in this study. The digital image correlation (DIC) method was [...] Read more.
In order to investigate the fatigue cracking resistance of engineered cementitious composites (ECC) used in in total life pavement, the semi-circular bending (SCB) test and improved three-point bending fatigue test (ITBF) were utilized in this study. The digital image correlation (DIC) method was also utilized to track the surface strain fields of specimens during the SCB test. X-ray computed tomography (CT) and digital image processing (DIP) technologies were applied to measure the internal-crack distribution of the ITBF specimen. The results of the SCB test showed that the fatigue cracking damage process of ECC can be divided into three stages and that the cracking stable propagating stages occupied the main part, which indicates that ECC has excellent ductility and toughness and could work very well with existing cracks. The ITBF results showed that the fatigue cracking resistance of ECC was better than epoxy asphalt concrete (EAC). In addition, the internal-crack distribution along the depth direction of the ITBF specimen could be presented well by the image pixel statistical (IPS) method based on CT scanning of image slices. It could be found that multiple cracks propagate simultaneously in ECC, instead of a single crack, under the OSBD pavement working condition. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis Formulation for Shear in Reinforced Concrete Beams
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(17), 3503; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9173503 - 25 Aug 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
This study suggests a novel beam-column element formulation that utilizes an equilibrium-driven shear stress function. The beam shear is obtained from the bi-axial states of micro-planes, through matrix condensation and zero vertical traction assumptions. This properly remedies the shear stiffening of a one-dimensional [...] Read more.
This study suggests a novel beam-column element formulation that utilizes an equilibrium-driven shear stress function. The beam shear is obtained from the bi-axial states of micro-planes, through matrix condensation and zero vertical traction assumptions. This properly remedies the shear stiffening of a one-dimensional beam-column element, keeping its degrees of freedom to a minimum. For verification of the proposed method, a total of seven shear test results of reinforced concrete (RC) beams were collected from the literature, in which the key variables were the reinforcement ratio, the presence of shear reinforcement, and section shape. The advantages are clearly shown in the shear stresses distributions being accurately described and the global load-displacement relations being successfully obtained and matching well with various test results. The proposed model shows satisfactory descriptions of the monotonic load-displacement response of the RC beams failing in multiple modes that vary from diagonal-tension to flexural-compression. In addition, more accurate and reliable information of sectional responses including sectional shear deformation and stresses is collected, leading to better prediction of a potential shear failure mode. Finally, the advantages of the proposed model are demonstrated by comparing the analysis results of an RCT-beam by using the different shear assumptions that include the constant and parabolic shear strains, constant shear flow, and the proposed shear stress function. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Assessment of Performance of Fiber Reinforced Geopolymer Composites by Experiment and Simulation Analysis
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(16), 3424; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9163424 - 20 Aug 2019
Abstract
In this work, the experimental and simulation analysis of the performance of geopolymer composites reinforced with steel fiber and polypropylene fiber is investigated. By embedding hooked end steel fiber and polypropylene fiber with various volume fractions of 0%, 0.5%, 1%, 1.5% to the [...] Read more.
In this work, the experimental and simulation analysis of the performance of geopolymer composites reinforced with steel fiber and polypropylene fiber is investigated. By embedding hooked end steel fiber and polypropylene fiber with various volume fractions of 0%, 0.5%, 1%, 1.5% to the geopolymer concrete mixture, the mechanical behavior was enhanced significantly through experimental results. The compressive strength was improved 26% with 0.5% of polypropylene fiber and 46% with 1% of hooked end steel fiber while the increment of splitting tensile strength was 12% and 28%, respectively. The flexural strength of specimens using two fiber types was also improved when compared with the non-fiber geopolymer concrete. The highest increment obtained with 1.5% of fiber volume content was from 26% to 42%. The compressive performance and flexural performance of fiber-reinforced geopolymer concrete were also better than specimens without fiber, with a higher load carrying capacity, higher stress, higher toughness and smaller strain. Using hooked end steel fiber resulted in better mechanical strength than using polypropylene fiber, and the presence of fibers is an important factor related to the strength improvements. A finite element analysis was modeled by the ANSYS program, and this showed that the load–deflection response and crack patterns also agreed quite well with experimental results. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Effect of Harsh Conditions on the Tensile Behaviour of Lap-Spliced Carbon Fiber Textile-Reinforced Mortar (TRM) with Different Surface Treatment Methods
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(15), 3087; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9153087 - 31 Jul 2019
Abstract
In the present study, the effect of harsh conditions on the tensile behavior of lap-spliced carbon fiber textile-reinforced mortar (TRM) with different surface treatment methods was investigated through the direct tensile test. The TRM coupons were exposed to three different harsh conditions: a [...] Read more.
In the present study, the effect of harsh conditions on the tensile behavior of lap-spliced carbon fiber textile-reinforced mortar (TRM) with different surface treatment methods was investigated through the direct tensile test. The TRM coupons were exposed to three different harsh conditions: a chloride environment of 3.5 wt.% sodium chloride, a high temperature and humidity environment (50 °C and 95% relative humidity), and sustained load of 30% of the tensile strength during 60 days. In addition, two different surface treatment methods of the lap-spliced region of TRM coupons were used: carbon fiber textile impregnated by epoxy resin, and carbon fiber textile covered with aluminum oxide (Al2O3) powder after epoxy resin impregnation. The tensile characteristics of TRM coupons were investigated in terms of the cracking strength, ultimate strength, initial stiffness, and ultimate strain, to evaluate the influence of different surface treatment methods on the tensile behaviors of TRM coupons after exposure to various types of harsh conditions. Additionally, the test results were compared to the previous test results of TRM coupons that were not subjected to harsh conditions. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Behavior of Fiber-Reinforced Polymer-Confined High-Strength Concrete under Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) Impact Compression
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(14), 2830; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9142830 - 16 Jul 2019
Abstract
Fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) has become increasingly popular in repairing existing steel-reinforced concrete (RC) members or constructing new structures. Although the quasi-static axial compression performance of FRP-confined concrete (FCC) has been comprehensively studied, its dynamic compression performance is not well understood, especially the dynamic [...] Read more.
Fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) has become increasingly popular in repairing existing steel-reinforced concrete (RC) members or constructing new structures. Although the quasi-static axial compression performance of FRP-confined concrete (FCC) has been comprehensively studied, its dynamic compression performance is not well understood, especially the dynamic compressive behavior of FRP-confined high-strength concrete (FCHC). This paper presents an experimental program that consists of quasi-static compression tests and Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) impact tests on FRP-confined high-strength concrete. The effects of the FRP types, FRP confinement stiffness, and strain rate on the impact resistance of FCHC are carefully studied. The experimental results show that the strain rate effect is evident for FRP-confined high-strength concrete and the existence of the FRP greatly improves the dynamic compressive strength of high-strength concrete. An existing strength model is modified for impact strength of FCHC and the predicted results are compared with the test results. The results and discussions show that the proposed model is accurate and superior to the existing models. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Experimental Study on Dynamic Response Characteristics of RPC and RC Micro Piles in SAJBs
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(13), 2644; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9132644 - 29 Jun 2019
Abstract
The pile foundations below approach slab in a semi-integral abutment jointless bridge (SAJB) that requires high flexibility to accommodate the horizontal cyclic deformation of approach slab generated by the girder’s thermal expansion and contraction as well as earthquake action. In this paper, reactive [...] Read more.
The pile foundations below approach slab in a semi-integral abutment jointless bridge (SAJB) that requires high flexibility to accommodate the horizontal cyclic deformation of approach slab generated by the girder’s thermal expansion and contraction as well as earthquake action. In this paper, reactive powder concrete (RPC) and reinforce concrete (RC) micro piles were designed and fabricated. The shaking table tests on dynamic response of micro piles-soil interaction were conducted to investigate the dynamic response characteristics such as the strain time history of pile-soil system, the bending moment, and the deformation of piles. The maximum strain response of piles was observed at the buried depth of 4.2 D (D is the diameter of pile). Meanwhile, the maximum bending moments of RPC and RC piles appear at the depth of 0.64 D and 0.42 D, respectively, under the dynamic load excitation, and the peak horizontal deformation of piles were observed at pile head. It is found that the bending moment and the strain response of the RPC pile are larger than that of the RC micro pile, and increased by 40% and 98%, respectively. The RPC micro pile has better crack resistance, higher ductility, and flexural rigidity than that of the RC pile, and it can be widely used as pile foundations in SAJBs for the earthquake area. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop