Special Issue "Tackling Challenges Associated with Antibiotic Resistance: Social, Economic and Policy Perspectives"

A special issue of Antibiotics (ISSN 2079-6382).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Richard Smith

Faculty of Public Health and Policy, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London WC1H 9SH, UK
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Guest Editor
Dr. Johanna Hanefeld

Faculty of Public Health and Policy, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London WC1H 9SH, UK
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Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Joanna Coast

School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 2PR, UK
Website | E-Mail
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Helen Lambert

School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 2PS, UK
Website | E-Mail

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A forthcoming Special Issue of Antibiotics will focus on the Social, Economic and Policy aspects of antibiotic resistance (ABR). Guest Editors, Professor Richard Smith and Dr. Johanna Hanefeld, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, and Professor Joanna Coast and Professor Helen Lambert, University of Bristol, UK, invite you to contribute a paper on this important topic.

ABR is high on national and global agendas. It is recognized as threatening the very foundations of modern healthcare, reversing the decline in mortality and morbidity from infectious diseases, and posing potentially crippling financial effects. Although intrinsically a biological phenomenon, the conditions promoting, or mitigating against, ABR are deeply social, shaped by cultural, political, and economic processes. As a social problem, ABR demands a social solution, one based on greater understanding, measurement, appraisal and modelling, and ultimately (re)shaping of the social, political, and economic environments in which resistance develops and antibiotics are used.

There is currently very limited evidence on these aspects of ABR. For instance, on the ways that farmers, vets, and regulatory systems manage the use of antibiotics in livestock production; how regulatory and fiscal frameworks incentivize or deter antibiotic development, production, and use; how diverse publics and healthcare professionals understand, value, and use antibiotics; what the future costs of resistance might be, and how they should be incorporated into decision making; and how to reconcile antibiotic stewardship with the need to ensure equitable access to these essential drugs. The Special Issue of Antibiotics will address issues such as these. The aim is to publish rigorous empirical original research and reviews, but also substantive contributions to the conceptual and methodological basis of such research. We are especially interested in papers that deploy sociological, anthropological, economic, organizational, policy or health systems perspectives to consider issues including (but not limited to):

  • Economic impact of ABR in specific settings—countries, regions, health care facilities;
  • Economic evaluation of interventions to control or reduce ABR;
  • Policy analysis related to availability of antibiotics and/or the development of new antibiotics;
  • Analysis of the “value chain” for antibiotics in specific settings;
  • Work focused on low- and middle-income countries;
  • Conceptual analysis of innovative ways to reduce use of antibiotics or develop alternative therapies;
  • Analysis of links between agricultural and human antibiotics and AMR;
  • Empirical research and analysis of sociocultural or economic drivers of ABR;
  • Health systems responses to ABR and/or the effects of regulatory change.

We encourage you to submit a paper on any of these issues, or to contact Professor Richard Smith (richard.smith@lshtm.ac.uk) in the first instance to discuss a proposed submission.

Prof. Dr. Richard Smith
Dr. Johanna Hanefeld
Prof. Dr. Joanna Coast
Prof. Dr. Helen Lambert
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antibiotics is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 550 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle The Consequences of AMR Education and Awareness Raising: Outputs, Outcomes, and Behavioural Impacts of an Antibiotic-Related Educational Activity in Lao PDR
Antibiotics 2018, 7(4), 95; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics7040095
Received: 2 September 2018 / Revised: 19 October 2018 / Accepted: 30 October 2018 / Published: 1 November 2018
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Abstract
Education and awareness raising are the primary tools of global health policy to change public behaviour and tackle antimicrobial resistance. Considering the limitations of an awareness agenda, and the lack of social research to inform alternative approaches, our objective was to generate new
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Education and awareness raising are the primary tools of global health policy to change public behaviour and tackle antimicrobial resistance. Considering the limitations of an awareness agenda, and the lack of social research to inform alternative approaches, our objective was to generate new empirical evidence on the consequences of antibiotic-related awareness raising in a low-income country context. We implemented an educational activity in two Lao villages to share general antibiotic-related messages and also to learn about people’s conceptions and health behaviours. Two rounds of census survey data enabled us to assess the activity’s outputs, its knowledge outcomes, and its immediate behavioural impacts in a difference-in-difference design. Our panel data covered 1130 adults over two rounds, including 58 activity participants and 208 villagers exposed indirectly via conversations in the village. We found that activity-related communication circulated among more privileged groups, which limited its indirect effects. Among participants, the educational activity influenced the awareness and understanding of “drug resistance”, whereas the effects on attitudes were minor. The evidence on the behavioural impacts was sparse and mixed, but the range of possible consequences included a disproportionate uptake of antibiotics from formal healthcare providers. Our study casts doubt on the continued dominance of awareness raising as a behavioural tool to address antibiotic resistance. Full article
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