How Animal Welfare Reforms Are Reshaping Societal Institutions Charged with Animal Management

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Animal Welfare".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 February 2022) | Viewed by 12169

Special Issue Editors

Terrestrial Wildlife Ecology Lab, School of Environment and Natural Resources, Ohio State University 379D Kottman Hall, 2021 Coffey Rd., Columbus, OH 43210,USA
Interests: human-wildlife interactions; wildlife conservation; social conflict; animal welfare
CFAES Center for Human-Animal Interactions Research & Education (CHAIRE), Columbus, OH, USA
Interests: human-animal interactions; animal welfare; conservation; animal agriculture

Special Issue Information

Summary: Concern for non-human animals is on the rise and has shown to be core to maintaining the social license to have animals in human care. This increased concern has manifested in many ways from official acts and policies to advocacy and activist groups, all affecting the ways in which humans interact with animals. The effects have created entire paradigm shifts for many animal institutions (i.e., animal agriculture, wildlife management, zoos & aquariums, research laboratories, shelters, therapy institutions) and continue to be transformed over time from both internal and external pressures. Thus, examining how animal welfare reforms have and will reshape human–animal interactions will be paramount for the future of societal institutions charged with animal stewardship. In this Special Issue, we welcome submissions exploring this topic broadly or specifically (one institution and/or one aspect of animal welfare). Our goals are to create a forum to highlight the complexity of animal welfare reform implementation and to serve as a catalyst for discussion of new considerations related to human–animal interactions.

Prof. Jeremy Bruskotter
Dr. Kelly A. George
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • animal welfare
  • human–animal interactions
  • conservation
  • one-health
  • animal agriculture

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

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18 pages, 1134 KiB  
Review
The Effect of Human–Horse Interactions on Equine Behaviour, Physiology, and Welfare: A Scoping Review
Animals 2021, 11(10), 2782; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11102782 - 24 Sep 2021
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 6856
Abstract
Human–horse interactions (HHIs) are diverse and prominent in the equine industry. Stakeholders have an invested interest in making sure that HHIs are humane. Assessment of equine welfare goes beyond physical health and includes assessment of the emotional state of the animal. HHIs can [...] Read more.
Human–horse interactions (HHIs) are diverse and prominent in the equine industry. Stakeholders have an invested interest in making sure that HHIs are humane. Assessment of equine welfare goes beyond physical health and includes assessment of the emotional state of the animal. HHIs can have a permanent effect on human–horse relationships, thereby influencing welfare. Therefore, an understanding of the horse’s affective state during HHIs is necessary. A scoping review was conducted to: (1) map current practices related to the measurement of HHIs; (2) explore the known effects of HHIs on horse behaviour and physiology; and (3) clarify the connection between HHIs and equine welfare. A total of 45 articles were included in this review. Studies that used both physiological and behavioural measures of equine response to human interactions accounted for 42% of the included studies. A further 31% exclusively used physiological measures and 27% used behavioural observation. Current evidence of equine welfare during HHIs is minimal and largely based on the absence of a negative affective state during imposed interactions. Broadening the scope of methods to evaluate a positive affective state and standardization of methodology to assess these states would improve the overall understanding of the horse’s welfare during HHIs. Full article
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15 pages, 329 KiB  
Commentary
Development of Desirable Behaviors in Dog-Assisted Interventions
Animals 2022, 12(4), 477; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani12040477 - 15 Feb 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 4460
Abstract
Dog-assisted interventions (DAI) are those that include specially trained dogs in human health services. Often, the training methods employed to train animals for DAI are transmitted between trainers, so the latest scientific research on dog learning and cognition is not always taken into [...] Read more.
Dog-assisted interventions (DAI) are those that include specially trained dogs in human health services. Often, the training methods employed to train animals for DAI are transmitted between trainers, so the latest scientific research on dog learning and cognition is not always taken into account. The present work aims to evaluate the impact that the main theories on the evolution of the dog have had both in promoting different training methods and in the relevance of behavior in the evolution of the skills of actual dogs. Then, an integrative method for the training of dogs is presented. This method takes into account the research on dog learning mechanisms and cognition processes, and effectively promotes the development of desirable behaviors for DAI during the dog’s ontogeny. Full article
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