Special Issue "Cattle Diseases"

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Cattle".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 February 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Steven Van Winden
Website
Guest Editor
Farm Animal Health and Production, The Royal Veterinary College, Hawkshead Lane, North Mymms, Hatfield, Hertfordshire, AL9 7TA, United Kingdom
Interests: cattle; dairy disease; pathophysiology; epidemiology; population; prevention
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cattle are the most common type of hooved production animal across the globe, with over 1 billion domesticated animals under our care. In different levels, they form a livelihood for families and create a stream of high-quality nutrition, through the beef and dairy sector. Keeping animals tends not to go perfectly all of the time. This creates the need for husbandry systems, balanced nutrition, pathogen control, and veterinary care to look after our cattle as well as we can. Understanding the interplay between these elements is essential for us to improve the care of our cattle even further.

The overall aim of this Special Issue is to create a base for better-informed disease management options. We are inviting papers presenting original research that advances our understanding of cattle disease and cattle health. This could include studies on infectious as well as production diseases in beef and dairy cattle, of all ages. Research at molecular, cellular, and animal levels furthering our knowledge of pathophysiology, as well as works advancing our knowledge at the population level are welcome in this Special Issue.

Dr. Steven Van Winden
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Animals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cattle
  • infection
  • production
  • disease
  • pathophysiology
  • population
  • prevention

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Production Significance of Bovine Respiratory Disease Lesions in Slaughtered Beef Cattle
Animals 2020, 10(10), 1770; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10101770 - 30 Sep 2020
Abstract
Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is still a serious concern in feedlots, where it exerts a negative effect on farm productivity. There is a shortage of studies focused on the evaluation of BRD-associated lesions at the slaughterhouse in clinically healthy animals. The objective of [...] Read more.
Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is still a serious concern in feedlots, where it exerts a negative effect on farm productivity. There is a shortage of studies focused on the evaluation of BRD-associated lesions at the slaughterhouse in clinically healthy animals. The objective of this work was to investigate the prevalence and type of subclinical pneumonic lesions in slaughtered beef cattle, according to the age range and management system, and its impact on carcass weight. A total of 1101 beef cattle intended for human consumption were examined at slaughter. Information on age, sex, management system and carcass weight was recorded. The presence and type of pneumonia were evaluated according to gross and microscopic findings and etiological agents by PCR. Lung pneumonic lesions appeared in 17.9% of animals and were predominant among veal calves. According to the type, chronic catarrhal pneumonia prevailed in the majority of animals, and mixed and extensively reared cattle were more likely to suffer acute fibrinous pneumonia. The presence of pneumonic lesions was associated with a significant decrease in carcass weight that had more of an impact in veal male calves coming from intensive systems. Bacterial infections were the predominant infectious agent and the only cause of acute fibrinous pneumonia, while viruses were infrequent and only found in lesions with chronic catarrhal pneumonia. This study shows the importance of BRD in beef feedlots upon production values and points out the feasibility of slaughterhouse assessment of pneumonia as a method for the evaluation of BRD significance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cattle Diseases)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Veterinarians’ Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices Associated with Bovine Viral Diarrhoea Virus Control and Prevention in South-East Australia
Animals 2020, 10(9), 1630; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10091630 - 11 Sep 2020
Abstract
In Australia, the responsibility and associated costs for the control and prevention of Bovine Viral Diarrhoea Virus (BVDV) rest solely with producers. Veterinarians provide producers with farm-specific options for BVDV management and support BVDV control and elimination in their region. We surveyed veterinarians [...] Read more.
In Australia, the responsibility and associated costs for the control and prevention of Bovine Viral Diarrhoea Virus (BVDV) rest solely with producers. Veterinarians provide producers with farm-specific options for BVDV management and support BVDV control and elimination in their region. We surveyed veterinarians to determine their knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) associated with BVDV control in south-east Australia. We found that veterinarians’ recommendations do not always align with producers’ control measures. Veterinarians were uncertain about BVDV prevalence and the proportion of producers using BVDV control measures in their regions. Veterinarians generally promoted biosecurity and vaccination, and were concerned about the welfare and additional disease risks associated with persistently infected (PI) cattle. Veterinarians highlighted concerns about disease risks associated with a previously undocumented practice in which producers collect blood from PI cattle to administer to BVDV naïve cattle; termed “vampire vaccination” in this study. A greater understanding of the burden, impact and economics of BVDV is needed to align veterinarians’ and producers’ KAP to improve BVDV management on farms, and more appreciation of veterinarians’ and producers’ values is needed before BVDV control could be implemented at a regional or country level. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cattle Diseases)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
The Effect of Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus spp. and Enterobacteriaceae on the Development of Whey Protein Levels and Oxidative Stress Markers in Cows with Diagnosed Mastitis
Animals 2020, 10(9), 1591; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10091591 - 07 Sep 2020
Abstract
Mastitis is one of the most common diseases of high-yielding dairy cows, and over 90% of cases are caused by Streptococcus spp., Enterobacteriaceae, or Staphylococcus spp. Certain groups of proteins are very significant in terms of the cow’s antioxidant, bacteriostatic, and germicidal [...] Read more.
Mastitis is one of the most common diseases of high-yielding dairy cows, and over 90% of cases are caused by Streptococcus spp., Enterobacteriaceae, or Staphylococcus spp. Certain groups of proteins are very significant in terms of the cow’s antioxidant, bacteriostatic, and germicidal properties: lysozyme (Lz), lactoferrin (Lf), and β-lactoglobulin (BLG). This study aimed to determine the influence of Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., and Enterobacteriaceae on the secretion of bioactive whey proteins and oxidative stress markers. From the herd, 60 multiparous cows with diagnosed mastitis were selected. Samples were taken individually from each quarter and pooled, which gave 60 samples. Enterobacteriaceae did not affect the BLG synthesis, whereas lysozyme and lactoferrin responded to a high concentration of these bacterial strains. In the case of Staphylococcus spp. infection, the BLG level increased. These strains did not affect the levels of di-malonic aldehyde (MDA), lactoferrin, and lysozyme. In contrast, they were significantly influenced by Streptococcus spp. In summary, the levels of whey proteins and oxidative stress markers changed depending on the bacterial strain inducing inflammation. Lysozyme and lactoferrin may be markers of udder inflammation caused by Enterobacteriaceae and Streptococcus spp., whereas β-lactoglobulin may prove useful in diagnosing Staphylococcus spp. induced mastitis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cattle Diseases)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Characterization of Endolysin LyJH307 with Antimicrobial Activity against Streptococcus bovis
Animals 2020, 10(6), 963; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10060963 - 01 Jun 2020
Abstract
Streptococcus bovis (S. bovis) is one of the critical initiators of acute acidosis in ruminants. Therefore, we aimed to develop and characterize the endolysin LyJH307, which can lyse ruminal S. bovis. We tested the bactericidal activity of recombinant LyJH307 against [...] Read more.
Streptococcus bovis (S. bovis) is one of the critical initiators of acute acidosis in ruminants. Therefore, we aimed to develop and characterize the endolysin LyJH307, which can lyse ruminal S. bovis. We tested the bactericidal activity of recombinant LyJH307 against S. bovis JB1 under a range of pH, temperature, NaCl, and metal ion concentrations. In silico analyses showed that LyJH307 has a modular design with a distinct, enzymatically active domain of the NLPC/P60 superfamily at the N-terminal and a cell wall binding domain of the Zoocin A target recognition domain (Zoocin A_TRD) superfamily at the C-terminal. The lytic activity of LyJH307 against S. bovis JB1 was the highest at pH 5.5, and relatively higher under acidic, than under alkaline conditions. LyJH307 activity was also the highest at 39 °C, but was maintained between 25°C and 55°C. LyJH307 bactericidal action was retained under 0-500 mM NaCl. While the activity of LyJH307 significantly decreased on treatment with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), it was only restored with supplementation of 10 mM Ca2+. Analyses of antimicrobial spectra showed that LyJH307 lysed Lancefield groups D (S. bovis group and Enterococcus faecalis) and H (S. sanguinis) bacteria. Thus, LyJH307 might help to prevent acute ruminal acidosis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cattle Diseases)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop