Special Issue "Stomata, Photosynthesis and Plant Water Use Efficiency"

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395). This special issue belongs to the section "Water Use and Irrigation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Jose Mariano Escalona
Website
Guest Editor
INAGEA-Department of Biology, University of the Balearic Islands
Interests: climate change; plant physiology; plant biology; physiology; photosynthesis; drought; ecophysiology; water stress; environmental physiology; vitis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Photosynthesis (A) is the main process in plants that determines plant growth and production. Under limiting growth conditions, plants reduce their photosynthetic activity. This fact is mainly regulated by stomata. However, there are other mechanisms and factors involved in the regulation of photosynthesis associated to genes and anatomical and biochemical characters. Plants’ photosynthesis capacity and its regulation depends mainly on genetics and is associated to environment acclimation and adaptation processes.

Under climate change conditions, water is the main limiting factor to crop production. To face this limitation, looking for an agronomical and genetic approach to improve water use efficiency (WUE) and productivity is essential. At leaf level, WUE defines the cost of water transpired for the CO2 assimilation process regulated by stomata so that a better balance between net photosynthesis and stomatal conductance the higher leaf WUE can be achieved. The sensibility and capability of a quick stoma adjustment capacity under limiting environments can be associated to an adaptive character that can benefit several cultivated species. Recent breeding programs have aimed to improve WUE through the selection of genotypes that are better adapted to drought that achieve an increase of yield and biomass production by reducing water needs.

Summarizing, the present Special Issue intends to showcase the more recent research in photosynthesis regulation and implication in WUE improvements under constrained environments.

Dr. Jose Mariano Escalona
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agronomy is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Climate change
  • Drought
  • Breeding
  • Genomics
  • Genetics
  • Metabolites

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Clonal Behavior in Response to Soil Water Availability in Tempranillo Grapevine cv: From Plant Growth to Water Use Efficiency
Agronomy 2020, 10(6), 862; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10060862 - 18 Jun 2020
Abstract
Climate change threatens worldwide grapevine production, especially in Mediterranean areas. To assume this challenge, the replacement of plant material to choose one more adapted to the new environmental conditions has been proposed as one of the possible solutions. Thus, the study of genetic [...] Read more.
Climate change threatens worldwide grapevine production, especially in Mediterranean areas. To assume this challenge, the replacement of plant material to choose one more adapted to the new environmental conditions has been proposed as one of the possible solutions. Thus, the study of genetic variability in water-use efficiency (WUE) is needed to guarantee the survival of viticulture in those critical areas. In this study, the variability of WUE in 23 Tempranillo clones growth in pots and submitted to well-watered conditions and moderate water stress was studied along two consecutive years. Leaf net photosynthesis (AN), stomatal conductance (gs), and plant growth parameters were measured, in addition the instrisic WUE (AN/gs), biomass production, and water consumed were calculated. Results show a clear genotype effect for most of the studied parameters, but, with an important year by year variability. We identified different clonal behavior in response to soil water availability, that permits to classify them as water-savers vs water-spenders. In general, there was no found relationship between leaf and plant WUE, even some genotypes as 232 or 1048 were coincident in higher leaf WUE showed highly productive in terms of biomass accumulation per unit of water applied. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stomata, Photosynthesis and Plant Water Use Efficiency)
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Open AccessArticle
Subsoiling Improves the Photosynthetic Characteristics of Leaves and Water Use Efficiency of Rainfed Summer Maize in the Southern Huang-Huai-Hai Plain of China
Agronomy 2020, 10(4), 465; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10040465 - 27 Mar 2020
Abstract
In the southern Huang-Huai-Hai (HHH) region, China, maize production is frequently threatened by waterlogging at the seedling stage and by drought at the big flare stage. A two-year field experiment was performed to explore whether subsoiling (SS) in the winter wheat season could [...] Read more.
In the southern Huang-Huai-Hai (HHH) region, China, maize production is frequently threatened by waterlogging at the seedling stage and by drought at the big flare stage. A two-year field experiment was performed to explore whether subsoiling (SS) in the winter wheat season could improve the photosynthetic capacity and increase the water use efficiency (WUE) of summer maize using the variety, Luyu9105. A split design was adopted in the experiment. The main plots used tillage practices, including SS and rotary tillage (RT). The subplots consisted of two irrigation methods, i.e., applied supplemental irrigation at the big flare stage (I) and no irrigation at the big flare stage (NI). The results showed that the SS treatment significantly increased soil water content (SWC) in the 40–60 cm soil layer. The SS treatment improved green leaf area index (gLAI) by 15.1%–30.2%, and enhanced the ear-leaf net photosynthetic rate (Pn), stomatal conductance (gs), intercellular CO2 concentration (ci) and transpiration rate (Tr), and was accompanied by an increase in the grain-filling duration (T) by 5 days and the mean grain-filling rate (Va). The SS treatment decreased the stomatal limitation (Ls), indicating that RT treatment, which was under lower SWC, led to a decrease in Pn. Applied supplemental irrigation under RT treatment was able to compensate for the growth of leaves, but could not reverse the decreasing trend in the gLAI. Ultimately, the SS treatment improved WUE by 9.1%–9.9%, and increased grain yields by 10.0%–29.3%. Therefore, this study showed that in the southern Huang-Huai-Hai Plain, which has a yellow cinnamon soil type, the practice of SS can improve the photosynthetic characteristics of leaves and WUE of rainfed summer maize. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stomata, Photosynthesis and Plant Water Use Efficiency)
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