Special Issue "How Plants Perceive Salt during the Irrigation"

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395). This special issue belongs to the section "Water Use and Irrigation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Camilla Pandolfi
Website
Guest Editor
DAGRI University of Florence
Interests: plants; plant biology; plant physiology; plant environmental; stress physiology; plant ecology; biomechanics; physiology horticulture; botany; ecology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Salt stress affects mineral nutrient balance, physiological, biochemical, and morphological responses, and gene expression of plants growing in saline soils or under irrigation with saline waters. The Special Issue “How Plants Perceive Salt during Irrigation” aims at elucidating plants’ response to saline irrigation, focusing on the role of salt and/or osmotic stress. The plants considered are conventional crops or edible species that could become new crops, thus including both salt-sensitive and salt-resistant species. Laboratory, greenhouse, and field trials testing saline solutions based on NaCl or saline waters found in field conditions, including brackish and seawater, are welcomed. Yield, growth, and productivity are of interest, together with plants’ perception of saline irrigation in terms of morphological and physiological adaptations and of production of secondary metabolites that, in addition to protecting the plant from osmotic and salt stress, may also increase the nutritional value of the crop: Understanding the interaction between stress and nutrition is also highly relevant for modern agriculture in order to ensure high yields and high quality of plant products produced under saline environments. Trials on salt acclimation and investigating the timings of salt administration are also welcomed.

This Special Issue intends to highlight the recent progress in the efforts to understand the response of plants to saline irrigation and alternatives to minimize salinity and osmotic effects, maintaining plant growth and development to assure commercially-feasible crop yields. All types of articles, original research, opinions, and reviews that provide new insights into the effects of salinity stress and the mechanisms involved in the stress responses are welcome.

Dr. Camilla Pandolfi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agronomy is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Saline irrigation
  • Salt stress
  • Osmotic stress
  • Glycophytes
  • Halophytes
  • Morphological adaptations
  • Physiological adaptations
  • Secondary metabolites

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Changes in Agronomic and Physiological Traits of Sugarcane Grown with Saline Irrigation Water
Agronomy 2020, 10(5), 722; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10050722 - 18 May 2020
Abstract
In Japan, the highest salt concentration in irrigation water for sugarcane cultivation has been reported to be above 2500 mg L−1, which may cause harmful effects to the crops; however, little information is available on the relationship between the salinity of [...] Read more.
In Japan, the highest salt concentration in irrigation water for sugarcane cultivation has been reported to be above 2500 mg L−1, which may cause harmful effects to the crops; however, little information is available on the relationship between the salinity of irrigation water and sugarcane. To investigate its effects on agronomic and physiological traits, a Japanese cultivar, Saccharum spp cv. NiF8, was grown with 0, 200, 500, 1000, 2000, and 3000 mg NaCl L−1 under pot conditions. The treatments significantly lowered leaf area; however, NaCl levels up to 500 mg L−1 did not greatly reduce culm weight and juice sugar concentration. These traits were impaired when the tested cultivar was grown with 1000 mg NaCl L−1 or higher, indicating that salt concentration is desired to be lower than 1000 mg L−1. CO2 assimilation rate was inhibited mainly due to stomatal closure caused by salt stress. The treatments significantly altered Na+, Cl, and K+ concentrations in juice but not those in leaf, suggesting that juice analysis is an effective method to estimate its salinization status. Culm weight and juice sugar concentration were severely affected as juice conductivity exceeded 900 mS m−1; thereby, sugarcane plants of NiF8 possessing conductivity above this level could be considered salt-stressed where water salinity is a concern. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue How Plants Perceive Salt during the Irrigation)
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Open AccessArticle
Germination and Emergence Responses of Alfalfa, Triticale and Quinoa Irrigated with Brackish Groundwater and Desalination Concentrate
Agronomy 2020, 10(4), 549; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10040549 - 10 Apr 2020
Abstract
Increasing human population has raised the demand for food and forage production for a secure future. Current agriculture is challenged by increasing salinity and decreasing vegetation, especially in the arid and semi-arid regions of the world. Western United States, especially, New Mexico is [...] Read more.
Increasing human population has raised the demand for food and forage production for a secure future. Current agriculture is challenged by increasing salinity and decreasing vegetation, especially in the arid and semi-arid regions of the world. Western United States, especially, New Mexico is confronting continued drought, sodic soils, and degrading rangelands. Groundwater is increasingly used to supplement surface water for irrigation, despite being brackish, with an EC greater than 3 dSm−1. One way to supplement irrigation water supply is to desalinize brackish groundwater using a reverse osmosis (RO) process and utilize the RO concentrate to irrigate food and forage crops. The objective of this study were to determine the germination and emergence of three species, alfalfa (Medicago sativa-VNS (variety not stated)), triticale (×Triticosecale (VNS)), and quinoa (Chenopodium californicum-hand selected from native stand in S. California), when irrigated with brackish and RO concentrate waters. A germination experiment was conducted with alfalfa, triticale, and quinoa for 20 days in growth chambers set at their optimum germination temperatures of 29/18 °C, 17/7 °C, and 17/7.2 °C day/night, respectively, with a 12-hour photoperiod. An emergence experiment was conducted with the same species under controlled conditions in a greenhouse. In both the experiments, seeds were irrigated with four irrigation water salinity treatments (EC 0.7 dSm−1 (tap water as control)), 4.0 dSm−1 brackish groundwater (BGW), 8.0 dSm−1 reverse osmosis concentrate (RO), and 10.0 dSm−1 (BGW + NaCl) irrigation. Germination %, and emergence %, mean germination and emergence time, germination and emergence index, Timson’s index and Timson’s modified index were calculated. Results showed triticale had the highest germination % (80.5% as soils main effect and 87.84 % as species main effect irrespective of salinity) and emergence % (91.25% with control and BGW, 87.19% with RO) while quinoa was the most sensitive to salinity. Sand soil was favorable promoting higher germination up to 8 dSm−1 and clay soil promoted good emergence in alfalfa and triticale. The mean germination and emergence time was the shortest for triticale followed by alfalfa and longest for quinoa. This clearly demonstrates triticale as a promising salt tolerant forage species that can be cultivated in dry and degraded rangelands. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue How Plants Perceive Salt during the Irrigation)
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