Special Issue "Role of Plant Nutrients in Agronomic Crops"

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 June 2018).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Masayuki Fujita
Website
Guest Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Crop plants cannot survive without plant nutrients. Essential nutrients have some specific roles in plants to maintain their growth and physiology. Both the deficiency and toxicity of those nutrients may lead to severe consequence to plant's life. Many agronomic crops under field condition lose their yield due to the improper nutrition. Therefore, understanding the role of plant nutrients in agronomic crops is very important. With the increase of global population, the demand for food crops, oil, fiber and other by-products yielding crops has been increasing. To boost up the food production, agronomic management such as nutrient management is one of the vital tasks for plant agronomists and plant biologists. Scientists have been trying to understanding the physiological basis of plant-nutrient interaction. In this special issue will focus on the most recent work on the role of plant nutrients in agronomic crops.

This Special Issue will focus on

·       Functions of plant nutrients at cellular levels

·       Role of Macronutrients in plant growth, development and yield
·       Role of Macronutrients in plant growth, development and yield
·       Trace elements in crop production
·       Transport and metabolism of plant nutrients in crops
·       Nutrient homeostatic and plant production
·       Plat nutrition and abiotic stress tolerance
·       Foliar fertilization: principles and practices
·       Fertilizer management for agronomic crops 

Dr. Mirza Hasanuzzaman
Prof. Masayuki Fujita
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agronomy is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Agronomy
  • Abioti Stress
  • Crop Plants
  • Plant Nutrition
  • Nitrogen
  • Phosphorus; Sulfur
  • Calcium; Silicon
  • Magnesium
  • Iron
  • Selenium
  • Plat Physiology
  • Crop Yield

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Early-Season Soil Waterlogging and N Fertilizer Sources Impacts on Corn N Uptake and Apparent N Recovery Efficiency
Agronomy 2018, 8(7), 102; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy8070102 - 27 Jun 2018
Cited by 4
Abstract
Soil waterlogging resulting from extreme precipitation events creates anaerobic conditions that may inhibit plant growth and increase N losses. A three-year (2013–2015) field experiment was conducted in poorly-drained claypan soils to assess the effects of waterlogging [0 or 7-days waterlogging at V3 growth [...] Read more.
Soil waterlogging resulting from extreme precipitation events creates anaerobic conditions that may inhibit plant growth and increase N losses. A three-year (2013–2015) field experiment was conducted in poorly-drained claypan soils to assess the effects of waterlogging [0 or 7-days waterlogging at V3 growth stage of corn (Zea mays L.)] and pre-plant application of different N fertilizer sources and post-waterlogging rescue N application (0 or 84 kg N ha−1 of urea plus urease inhibitor (NCU + UI) at V7) on chlorophyll SPAD meter (CM) readings, stomatal conductance, ear leaf and silage N concentrations, N uptake and apparent N recovery efficiency (ARE) of two corn hybrids with varying amounts of flood tolerance. Pre-plant N fertilizer sources included a non-treated control (CO), urea (NCU), urea plus nitrification inhibitor (NCU + NI) and polymer coated urea (PCU) applied at 168 kg N ha−1. In 7-days waterlogged plots, rescue N applications increased N uptake in PCU treatments 33% and 40% in 2013 and 2014, respectively, as well as in NCU by 48% in 2013. In 7-days waterlogged plots which received rescue N applications, NCU and PCU in 2013 resulted in higher N uptake than CO and NCU + NI by 47 to 77 kg ha−1. PCU had higher N uptake than NCU and NCU + NI by 78 and 72 kg ha−1 in 7-days waterlogged plots that received rescue N applications in 2014. Corn hybrid showed no differences in N uptake and ARE in our study. Our results indicate combining pre-plant N fertilizer source selection and rescue N applications may be a strategy to reduce possible decreases in corn N uptake caused by early season soil waterlogging in average rainfall years. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Role of Plant Nutrients in Agronomic Crops)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Resource Use Efficiencies of C3 and C4 Cereals under Split Nitrogen Regimes
Agronomy 2018, 8(5), 69; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy8050069 - 09 May 2018
Cited by 6
Abstract
Resources are limited, thus improving resource use efficiency is a key objective for cereal-based cropping systems. This field study was carried out to quantify resource use efficiencies in selected C3 and C4 cereals under split nitrogen (N) application regimes. The study [...] Read more.
Resources are limited, thus improving resource use efficiency is a key objective for cereal-based cropping systems. This field study was carried out to quantify resource use efficiencies in selected C3 and C4 cereals under split nitrogen (N) application regimes. The study included the following treatments: six cereals (three C3: wheat, oat, and barley; and three C4: maize, millet, and sorghum) and four split N application regimes (NS1 = full amount of N at sowing; NS2 = half N at sowing + half N at first irrigation; NS3 = ⅓ N at sowing + ⅓ N at first irrigation + ⅓ N at second irrigation; NS4 = ¼ N at sowing + ¼ N at first irrigation + ¼ N at second irrigation + ¼ N at third irrigation). Results revealed that C4 cereals out-yielded C3 cereals in terms of biomass production, grain yield, and resource use efficiencies (i.e., radiation use efficiency (RUE) and nitrogen use efficiency (NUE)), while splitting N into three applications proved to be a better strategy for all of the selected winter and summer cereals. The results suggest that C4 cereals should be added into existing cereal-based cropping systems and N application done in three installments to boost productivity and higher resource use efficiency to ensure food security for the burgeoning population. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Role of Plant Nutrients in Agronomic Crops)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Reducing Severity of Late Blight (Phytophthora infestans) and Improving Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) Tuber Yield with Pre-Harvest Application of Calcium Nutrients
Agronomy 2017, 7(4), 69; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy7040069 - 21 Oct 2017
Abstract
The efficiency of pre-harvest application of calcium chloride alone, calcium nitrate alone, and combined application of calcium chloride and calcium nitrate (1:1) was evaluated in reducing the severity of P. infestans and improving potato tuber yield. Pot experiment was conducted in randomized complete [...] Read more.
The efficiency of pre-harvest application of calcium chloride alone, calcium nitrate alone, and combined application of calcium chloride and calcium nitrate (1:1) was evaluated in reducing the severity of P. infestans and improving potato tuber yield. Pot experiment was conducted in randomized complete block design with four replications. The treatments consisted of combination of two potato varieties (Shenkola and Gera) and three types of calcium nutrients (calcium chloride alone, calcium nitrate alone, and calcium chloride mixed with calcium nitrate), each at three levels (5, 10, and 15 g per liter per plant) and the control treatment (0 g of calcium nutrients). In comparison to the control treatment, the application of calcium nutrients significantly decreased the severity of late blight disease and improved potato tuber yield. The effect of calcium nutrients on the severity of late blight disease and potato tuber yield differed among the two potato varieties. The maximum severity reduction (60%) was noticed in the Gera potato variety with the application of calcium chloride mixed with calcium nitrate (1:1), supplied at 15 g per plant. However, the highest average tuber yield was obtained with the application of calcium nitrate at 15 g per plant, and average tuber yield was increased by 77% in both potato varieties. Hence, foliar application of either calcium nitrate alone or calcium nitrate mixed with calcium chloride was found to be more efficient than the application of calcium chloride alone. This result suggests that the nitrate ion present in the calcium nitrate may make a difference in terms of reducing the severity of late blight disease and improving potato tuber yield. The lowered severity of late blight disease and the increased tuber yield in potato plants sprayed with calcium nutrients may be because of the higher accumulation of calcium in the plant tissue. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Role of Plant Nutrients in Agronomic Crops)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
Potassium: A Vital Regulator of Plant Responses and Tolerance to Abiotic Stresses
Agronomy 2018, 8(3), 31; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy8030031 - 12 Mar 2018
Cited by 45
Abstract
Among the plant nutrients, potassium (K) is one of the vital elements required for plant growth and physiology. Potassium is not only a constituent of the plant structure but it also has a regulatory function in several biochemical processes related to protein synthesis, [...] Read more.
Among the plant nutrients, potassium (K) is one of the vital elements required for plant growth and physiology. Potassium is not only a constituent of the plant structure but it also has a regulatory function in several biochemical processes related to protein synthesis, carbohydrate metabolism, and enzyme activation. Several physiological processes depend on K, such as stomatal regulation and photosynthesis. In recent decades, K was found to provide abiotic stress tolerance. Under salt stress, K helps to maintain ion homeostasis and to regulate the osmotic balance. Under drought stress conditions, K regulates stomatal opening and helps plants adapt to water deficits. Many reports support the notion that K enhances antioxidant defense in plants and therefore protects them from oxidative stress under various environmental adversities. In addition, this element provides some cellular signaling alone or in association with other signaling molecules and phytohormones. Although considerable progress has been made in understanding K-induced abiotic stress tolerance in plants, the exact molecular mechanisms of these protections are still under investigation. In this review, we summarized the recent literature on the biological functions of K, its uptake, its translocation, and its role in plant abiotic stress tolerance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Role of Plant Nutrients in Agronomic Crops)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop