Special Issue "Role of Plant Tissue Culture in Agricultural Research and Production"

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395). This special issue belongs to the section "Agricultural Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 September 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Mukund R. Shukla
Website
Guest Editor
Gosling Research Institute for Plant Preservation, Department of Plant Agriculture, University of Guelph, 50 Stone Rd E,EC Bovey Bldg, Room 4221, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Plant tissue culture plays an important role in the field of fundamental research, conservation, and production. Studying plant morphogenesis and plant physiology requires the ability to grow plants in vitro and plant tissue culture techniques provide the best way to accomplish this. Due to the changing climate, preserving plant biodiversity for future crop security and vegetation is of utmost importance. Techniques such as ex-situ conservation are effective in maintaining plant biodiversity. In vitro technologies allow for the optimization and production of plants that can be used for ex-situ conservation. Furthermore, plant propagation by tissue-culture offers an excellent commercial prospect for the industry engaged in the production of ornamental, vegetable, and fruit plants, where the value of the products is high. The micropropagation technique has reportedly been successful in more than 100 species of plants. However, the development of new technologies and protocols that can be effective at the commercial scale is still needed.

This Special Issue is focused on the “Role of Plant Tissue Culture in Agricultural Research and Production.” This will entail novel research studies and reviews focusing on all related topics including plant morphogenesis, plant growth and development, mass propagation, ex-situ conservation, fruit trees, ornamentals, medicinal plants, cannabis, plant tissue culture lab, light conditions, etc.

Dr. Mukund R. Shukla
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agronomy is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Plant morphogenesis
  • plant growth and development
  • mass propagation
  • ex-situ conservation
  • fruit trees
  • ornamentals
  • medicinal plants
  • cannabis
  • plant tissue culture lab
  • light conditions

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
In Vitro Regeneration, Ex Vitro Rooting and Foliar Stoma Studies of Pseudostellaria heterophylla (Miq.) Pax
Agronomy 2020, 10(7), 949; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10070949 - 01 Jul 2020
Abstract
Pseudostellaria heterophylla, in the family Caryophyllaceae, is an important Chinese medicinal plant commonly used to treat various diseases in children and valued for its ornamental properties. In this study, nodal segments were obtained from wild plants and used as explants to develop [...] Read more.
Pseudostellaria heterophylla, in the family Caryophyllaceae, is an important Chinese medicinal plant commonly used to treat various diseases in children and valued for its ornamental properties. In this study, nodal segments were obtained from wild plants and used as explants to develop an efficient micropropagation protocol for this species. Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with 1.5 mg·L−1 6-benzyladenine (6-BA) was the most suitable medium for inducing axillary buds and enhancing their growth, and MS medium containing 0.1 mg·L−1 indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) was the most effective for inducing in vitro rooting. To reduce labor, time, and cost, microshoots were rooted under ex vitro conditions. Pretreatments of the shoots with 100 mg·L−1 naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) for 1 min ensured successful rooting in 86.7% of shoots. Comparison of the leaf microstructure between in vitro- and ex vitro-rooted plantlets revealed abnormal stomatal apparatus in the former. The stomatal apparatus of ex vitro plantlets were normal, although the stomatal density was reduced, which indicated that these plantlets were more likely to be able to adapt to environmental conditions in the field. We identified the optimal medium for P. heterophylla multiplication with respect to increased rooting efficiency of micropropagated shoots under ex vitro conditions. This results presented here will be helpful for agricultural cultivation of P. heterophylla. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Role of Plant Tissue Culture in Agricultural Research and Production)
Open AccessArticle
Impact of Ionic Liquids on Induction of Wheat Microspore Embryogenesis and Plant Regeneration
Agronomy 2020, 10(6), 839; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10060839 - 12 Jun 2020
Abstract
Ionic liquids are novel compounds with unique chemical and physical properties. They can be received based on synthetic auxins like 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid or dicamba, which are commonly used hormones in microspore embryogenesis. Nevertheless, ionic liquids have not been adapted in plant in vitro [...] Read more.
Ionic liquids are novel compounds with unique chemical and physical properties. They can be received based on synthetic auxins like 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid or dicamba, which are commonly used hormones in microspore embryogenesis. Nevertheless, ionic liquids have not been adapted in plant in vitro culture thus far. Therefore, we studied the impact of ionic liquids on the ability to undergo microspore embryogenesis in anther cultures of wheat. Two embryogenic and two recalcitrant genotypes were used for this study. Ten combinations of ionic liquids and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid were added to the induction medium. In most cases, they stimulated induction of microspore embryogenesis and green plant regeneration more than a control medium supplemented with only 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. Two treatments were the most favorable, resulting in over two times greater efficiency of microspore embryogenesis induction in comparison to the control. The effect of breaking down the genotype recalcitrance (manifested by green plant formation) was observed under the influence of 5 ionic liquids treatments. Summing up, ionic liquids had a positive impact on microspore embryogenesis induction and green plant regeneration, increasing the efficiency of these phenomena in both embryogenic and recalcitrant genotypes. Herbicidal ionic liquids can be successfully used in in vitro cultures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Role of Plant Tissue Culture in Agricultural Research and Production)
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Open AccessArticle
Colchicine Mutagenesis from Long-term Cultured Adventitious Roots Increases Biomass and Ginsenoside Production in Wild Ginseng (Panax ginseng Mayer)
Agronomy 2020, 10(6), 785; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10060785 - 31 May 2020
Abstract
Panax ginseng Mayer is a perennial herb that has been used as a medicinal plant in Eastern Asia for thousands of years. The aim of this study was to enhance root biomass and ginsenoside content in cultured adventitious roots by colchicine mutagenesis. Adventitious [...] Read more.
Panax ginseng Mayer is a perennial herb that has been used as a medicinal plant in Eastern Asia for thousands of years. The aim of this study was to enhance root biomass and ginsenoside content in cultured adventitious roots by colchicine mutagenesis. Adventitious P. ginseng roots were treated with colchicine at different concentrations (100, 200, and 300 mg·L−1) and for different durations (1, 2, and 3 days). Genetic variability of mutant lines was assessed using random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. Ginsenoside biosynthesis gene expression, ginsenoside content, enzyme activities, and performance in bioreactor culture were assessed in four mutant lines (100–1-2, 100–1-18, 300–1-16, and 300–2-8). The results showed that ginsenoside productivity was enhanced in all mutant lines, with mutant 100–1-18 exhibiting the most pronounced increase (4.8-fold higher than the control). Expression of some ginsenoside biosynthetic enzymes was elevated in mutant lines. Enzyme activities varied among lines, and lipid peroxidation activity correlated with root biomass. All four lines were suitable for bioreactor cultivation, with mutant 100–1-18 exhibiting the highest biomass after culture scale-up. The results indicated that colchicine mutagenesis of P. ginseng roots increased biomass and ginsenosides production. This technique, and the root lines produced in this study, may be used to increase industrial yields of P. ginseng biomass and ginsenosides. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Role of Plant Tissue Culture in Agricultural Research and Production)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Light Quality Affects Growth and Physiology of Carpesium triste Maxim. Cultured In Vitro
Authors: Byoung Ryong Jeong; Jin Zhao; Luc The Thi; Yoo Gyeong Park
Affiliation: Department of Horticulture, Division of Applied Life Science (BK21 Plus Program), Graduate School of Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 52828, Korea
Abstract: The objective of this study was to find an effective method to disinfect seeds, optimize the culture conditions of organogenesis and callogenesis, and investigate the effects of the light quality on the growth, photosynthetic pigment contents, chlorophyll a fluorescence parameters, and antioxidant enzyme activities, to establish the regeneration system in vitro and preliminarily explore the internal mechanisms of how the light quality affects the growth and physiology of Carpesium triste. Results show that exposure to 3% (v/v) NaClO for 15 minutes was the optimal disinfection method of C. triste seeds, due to the highest seed germination rate and lowest contamination rate. 0.5 mg∙L-1 IBA combined with 1.0 mg∙L-1 BA, and 0.5 mg∙L-1 IBA alone significantly promoted the callus induction, and root formation from leaf explants, respectively. In addition, stem apex explants were cultured on the Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium under a white fluorescent lamp (FL), red (R), blue (B), or 1:1 mixture of red and blue (RB) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) for 4 weeks. RB light induced sturdy plantlets, increased the photosynthetic pigment contents, photosynthetic electron transport and its efficiency, and antioxidant enzyme activities in the plantlets. Taken together, monochromatic red and blue LEDs could be harnessed for the production of high-quality C. triste plantlets in vitro.

Title: In vitro regeneration, ex vitro rooting and foliar stoma studies of Pseudostellaria heterophylla (Miq.) Pax
Authors: Fengyun Wang; Xiaowei Xin2; Hao Wei; Xiaohui Qiu; Boling Liu
Affiliation: School of Life Sciences, Qufu Normal University, Qufu, Shandong 273165 China
Abstract: Pseudostellaria heterophylla, in the family Caryophyllaceae, is an important Chinese medicinal plant commonly used to treat various diseases in children and valued for its ornamental properties. In this study, nodal segments were obtained from wild plants and used as explants to develop an efficient micropropagation protocol for this species. Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with 1.5 mg·L-1 6-benzyladenin (6-BA) was the most suitable medium for inducing axillary buds and enhancing their growth, and MS medium containing 0.1 mg·L-1 indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) was the most effective for inducing in vitro rooting. To reduce labor, time, and cost, microshoots were rooted under ex vitro conditions. Pretreatments of the shoots with 100 mg·L-1 naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) for 1 min ensured successful rooting in 86.7% of shoots. Comparison of the leaf microstructure between in vitro- and ex vitro-rooted plantlets revealed abnormal stomatal apparatus in the former. The stomatal apparatus of ex vitro plantlets was normal, although the stomatal density was reduced, which indicated that these plantlets were more likely to be able to adapt to environmental conditions in the field. We identified the optimal medium for P. heterophylla multiplication with respect to increased rooting efficiency of micropropagated shoots under ex vitro conditions. This results presented here will be helpful for commercial cultivation of P. heterophylla.

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