Special Issue "QTL Mapping of Drought Tolerance"

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2017)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Silvio Salvi

Department of Agricultural Sciences (DipSA), University of Bologna, Bologna 40127, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: QTL mapping; root architecture; root development; shoot development; flowering time; maize; barley; wheat; mutagenesis; tilling

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Drought has long been recognized as one of the strongest abiotic factor negatively impacting crop production, both qualitatively and quantitatively. The increasingly occurrence of extreme climatic events, coupled with the higher competition for water among agricultural, industrial, and domestic needs, makes water availability an even more urgent priority. Breeding more drought tolerant, resilient, and water-use efficient varieties is one of the best choices available to face this challenge.

Plants respond to drought by adapting or evolving multiple developmental and physiological processes, which are under multigenic control. Additional complexity is provided by the concurrence of other stresses (e.g. heat waves). Significant genetic variation for these responses is usually present within the species or in closely related gene pools and Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) mapping has already proved to be an ideal entry point for understanding the genetic basis of such variation. Based on QTL results, useful alleles can be identified and exploited in genomics-assisted breeding programs.

Scientists working in this area are invited to present their latest results in the special issue “QTL Mapping of Drought Tolerance”. Specifically, research articles reporting on QTL mapping approaches for the dissection of the genetic control of crops traits (including, but not limited to, root and shoot development and physiology, transpiration, WUE, cellular homeostasis, photosynthesis-related traits, etc.) involved in the response to drought, or on the identification/characterization/deployment of allele variation related with enhanced drought tolerance, will be most welcomed. Outstanding reviews will also be considered.

Prof. Silvio Salvi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Drought tolerance
  • GWA
  • Marker-assisted selection
  • QTL
  • Root architecture
  • Transpiration
  • WUE

 

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle QTL for Water Use Related Traits in Juvenile Barley
Received: 28 September 2016 / Revised: 24 November 2016 / Accepted: 1 December 2016 / Published: 8 December 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (414 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Water use efficiency (WUE) is a trait of prime interest in cases of drought stress because it provides information on biomass production in limited water conditions. In order to get information on WUE and additional water use related traits, i.e., dry weight (DW), [...] Read more.
Water use efficiency (WUE) is a trait of prime interest in cases of drought stress because it provides information on biomass production in limited water conditions. In order to get information on WUE and additional water use related traits, i.e., dry weight (DW), fresh weight (FW), total leaf water (LW) and leaf water content (WC), greenhouse pot experiments were conducted on 156 barley genotypes (Hordeum vulgare L.) for control (70% maximal water capacity of soil) and drought stress conditions (20% of the maximal water capacity of soil). Significant correlations between WUE and the other water use related traits (r ≤ 0.65) were determined in juvenile barley, and genotypes suited for improving drought stress tolerance in early developmental stages were identified. Furthermore, based on the significant effects of genotypes and treatments, as well as their interaction, data were used for genome wide association studies (GWAS) resulting in the identification of 14 marker trait associations (MTAs) corresponding to four quantitative trait loci (QTL). For WUE, four MTAs were detected mostly located on barley chromosome 4H. For four MTAs, functional annotations related to the involvement in response to abiotic stress were found. These markers may be of special interest for breeding purposes in cases when they will be validated and also detected in later growth stages. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue QTL Mapping of Drought Tolerance)
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Open AccessArticle Impact of Pre-Anthesis Water Deficit on Yield and Yield Components in Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) Plants Grown under Controlled Conditions
Received: 15 March 2016 / Revised: 3 May 2016 / Accepted: 12 May 2016 / Published: 18 May 2016
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (437 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Drought at pre-anthesis stages can influence barley growth and results in yield losses. Therefore, it is important to understand how drought at pre-anthesis can affect different traits associated with yield reduction in barley. The objective of this study was to understand the relevance [...] Read more.
Drought at pre-anthesis stages can influence barley growth and results in yield losses. Therefore, it is important to understand how drought at pre-anthesis can affect different traits associated with yield reduction in barley. The objective of this study was to understand the relevance of the genetic background of major flowering time genes in barley plants subjected to pre-anthesis drought and its impact on yield and yield components. A glasshouse experiment using a Randomized Complete Block Design was conducted to investigate the effect of drought and its timing on yield and yield components on eleven barley genotypes, which were selected to represent genetic diversity of major flowering time genes (PPDH1, PPDH2, HvVrn1, HvVrn2 and HvVrn3). Barley plants were exposed to three water regimes, non-stressed and stressed, which was applied at two pre-anthesis growth stages, tillering (SS) and stem elongation (SE). Results identified differences among genotypes in all measured traits. Grain yield, grain number and "thousand kernel weight" were reduced in all genotypes due to drought, irrespective of the growth stage. Early flowering genotypes had better performance as reflected in higher yield compared with late flowering genotypes. Results verified the fundamental importance of early flowering to improve productivity in response to pre-anthesis drought. The results of this study can help in selecting barley lines for future breeding purposes with improved resilience to drought conditions in Mediterranean environments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue QTL Mapping of Drought Tolerance)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Bridging the Rice Yield Gaps under Drought: QTLs, Genes, and their Use in Breeding Programs
Received: 5 January 2017 / Revised: 22 February 2017 / Accepted: 27 March 2017 / Published: 9 April 2017
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (3064 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Rice is the staple food for more than half of the world’s population. Although rice production has doubled in the last 30 years as a result of the development of high-yield, widely adaptable, resource-responsive, semi-dwarf varieties, the threat of a food crisis remains [...] Read more.
Rice is the staple food for more than half of the world’s population. Although rice production has doubled in the last 30 years as a result of the development of high-yield, widely adaptable, resource-responsive, semi-dwarf varieties, the threat of a food crisis remains as severe as it was 60 years ago due to the ever-increasing population, water scarcity, labor scarcity, shifting climatic conditions, pest/diseases, loss of productive land to housing, industries, rising sea levels, increasing incidences of drought, flood, urbanization, soil erosion, reduction in soil nutrient status, and environmental issues associated with high-input agriculture. Among these, drought is predicted to be the most severe stress that reduces rice yield. Systematic research on drought over the last 10 years has been conducted across institutes on physiology, breeding, molecular genetics, biotechnology, and cellular and molecular biology. This has provided a better understanding of plant drought mechanisms and has helped scientists to devise better strategies to reduce rice yield losses under drought stress. These include the identification of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for grain yield under drought as well as many agronomically important traits related to drought tolerance, marker-assisted pyramiding of genetic regions that increase yield under drought, development of efficient techniques for genetic transformation, complete sequencing and annotation of rice genomes, and synteny studies of rice and other cereal genomes. Conventional and marker-assisted breeding rice lines containing useful introgressed genes or loci have been field tested and released as varieties. Still, there is a long way to go towards developing drought-tolerant rice varieties by exploiting existing genetic diversity, identifying superior alleles for drought tolerance, understanding interactions among alleles for drought tolerance and their interaction with genetic backgrounds, and pyramiding the best combination of alleles. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue QTL Mapping of Drought Tolerance)
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Open AccessReview QTL Analysis for Drought Tolerance in Wheat: Present Status and Future Possibilities
Received: 8 October 2016 / Revised: 4 December 2016 / Accepted: 26 December 2016 / Published: 4 January 2017
Cited by 14 | PDF Full-text (786 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
In recent years, with climate change, drought stress has been witnessed in many parts of the world. In many irrigated regions also, shortage of water supply allows only limited irrigation. These conditions have an adverse effect on the productivity of many crops including [...] Read more.
In recent years, with climate change, drought stress has been witnessed in many parts of the world. In many irrigated regions also, shortage of water supply allows only limited irrigation. These conditions have an adverse effect on the productivity of many crops including cereals such as wheat. Therefore, genetics of drought/water stress tolerance in different crops has become a priority area of research. This research mainly involves use of quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis (involving both interval mapping and association mapping) for traits that are related to water-use efficiency. In this article, we briefly review the available literature on QTL analyses in wheat for traits, which respond to drought/water stress. The outlook for future research in this area and the possible approaches for utilizing the available information on genetics of drought tolerance for wheat breeding are also discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue QTL Mapping of Drought Tolerance)
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