Natural Compounds as Bioherbicide for an Eco-Friendly Agriculture

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395). This special issue belongs to the section "Agricultural Biosystem and Biological Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2022) | Viewed by 8020

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Locality Feo di Vito, Department AGRARIA, University Mediterranea of Reggio Calabria, 89124 SNC Reggio Calabria, Italy
Interests: allelopathy; secondary metabolites; essential oils; weed management; plant nutrition; metabolomics; mode of action; chemical interaction; bio-herbicides
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Locality Campus Lagoas-Marcosende, Dpt. Plant Biology and Soil Science, Universidade de Vigo., 36310 Vigo, Spain
Interests: secondary metabolites; mode of action; bioherbicides; allelopathy; weed management; plant stress; climate change
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Instituto Agroforestal Mediterráneo (IAM), Universitat Politècnica de València, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia, Spain
Interests: natural products; essential oils; plant extracts; weed biology; weed management; bioherbicides; allelopathy; biostimulants; plant stress
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Weeds are one of the major constraints in crop production in agroecosystems, competing with crops for nutrients and water and negatively affecting both quality and crop yields. It has been estimated that crop losses induced by weeds average almost 34% of the world’s agricultural output, and the use of synthetic herbicides, which are easy to apply and accessible to farmers, is the most common method of weed management.

Nevertheless, concerns are now being expressed worldwide about the environmental impact and effects of the widespread use of chemical herbicides on human health and the environment.

Moreover, repeated use of the same herbicides with similar modes of action on weed populations significantly increases the inherited ability of a plant to survive, developing weed biotypes which are resistant to the main chemicals used.

Against this backdrop, producers, the agrochemical industry, and researchers are shifting their attention to alternative weed control strategies based on the use of natural and natural-like compounds. These specialized metabolites are potentially less toxic, could have a new mode of action, and may interact with weeds affecting new target sites or more than one target site while reducing the potential development of weed resistance.

Therefore, natural or natural-like molecules could represent a valid alternative strategy for weed management in the framework of sustainable agriculture and integrated weed management. Further, the diversity of molecular structures from living sources should provide novel chemical skeletons or templates that are unlikely to be produced by traditional herbicide synthesis programs.

Therefore, this Special Issue deals with the use of specialized metabolites produced by different living organisms to isolate and identify new candidates to produce novel bioherbicides with new modes of action and low toxicity for the environment and human health. The Special Issue is mainly focused on, but not restricted to:

- Allelopathy;

- Isolation and identification of natural compounds from plants with biological activity against weeds;

- Identification of the target and mode of action of pure natural molecules and/or mixtures on weed/pest physiology and metabolism;

- Use of natural products as repellent/attractive agents against parasitic weeds (e.g., Cuscuta sp., Orobanche sp., Striga sp., etc.);

- Use of allelopathic crops in crop rotation;

- Use of essential oils for weed management

- Synthesis of ecofriendly natural-like compounds with biological activity against weeds;

- New formulations for weed management

Dr. Fabrizio Araniti
Dr. Adela M. Sánchez Moreiras
Dr. Mercedes Verdeguer
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • sustainable agriculture
  • integrated weed management
  • secondary metabolites
  • natural compounds as elicitors
  • allelopathy
  • essential oils in crop protection
  • allelopathic crops
  • bioherbicides
  • phytotoxins
  • natural herbicides
  • biological control
  • omics
  • mode of action

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 1929 KiB  
Article
Control of Problematic Weeds in Mediterranean Vineyards with the Bioherbicide Pelargonic Acid
by Marta Muñoz, Natalia Torres-Pagán, Amira Jouini, Fabrizio Araniti, Adela M. Sánchez-Moreiras and Mercedes Verdeguer
Agronomy 2022, 12(10), 2476; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy12102476 - 11 Oct 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1808
Abstract
Pelargonic acid (PA) is the only natural herbicide authorized for professional use in Spain. Incorporating PA into an integrated weed management strategy in vineyards may enable a more sustainable production method for grapes. In this work, PA of 55% concentration, formulated by a [...] Read more.
Pelargonic acid (PA) is the only natural herbicide authorized for professional use in Spain. Incorporating PA into an integrated weed management strategy in vineyards may enable a more sustainable production method for grapes. In this work, PA of 55% concentration, formulated by a commercial company (PSEI), was evaluated and applied at 8, 10, 12, and 15 L/ha for weed control in Mediterranean vineyards during 2020 and 2021. A total of 22 different weed species, 16 dicotyledonous and 6 monocotyledonous, were identified in the experimental areas. Previously, greenhouse assays were performed against Avena fatua L. and Chenopodium album L. to determine the dose/response curves. PSEI proved to be a viable post-emergence herbicide with an efficacy of 40.79–80.90%, depending on the applied dose (higher doses were the most effective). Broader herbicidal activity (20% or more) was obtained against dicotyledonous weeds compared with monocotyledonous. The PA formulation was remarkable in achieving PSEI-similar effects as compared to the market reference but at lower concentrations (around 13% less PA) and doses (1–8 less L/ha). PA has proved to be a good candidate to control weeds in Mediterranean vineyards when used as a post-emergence broad-spectrum herbicide in the first stages of weed development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Compounds as Bioherbicide for an Eco-Friendly Agriculture)
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13 pages, 654 KiB  
Article
Herbicidal Effect of Different Alternative Compounds to Control Conyza bonariensis in Vineyards
by Carlos Cabrera-Pérez, Aritz Royo-Esnal and Jordi Recasens
Agronomy 2022, 12(4), 960; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy12040960 - 15 Apr 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2100
Abstract
Conyza bonariensis (L.) Cronquist is a widespread noxious weed with high fecundity, associated with no-till systems such as vineyards and other perennial crops in Mediterranean climates. Seeds germinate in staggered flushes, which leads to a great variation in the growth stage between individuals [...] Read more.
Conyza bonariensis (L.) Cronquist is a widespread noxious weed with high fecundity, associated with no-till systems such as vineyards and other perennial crops in Mediterranean climates. Seeds germinate in staggered flushes, which leads to a great variation in the growth stage between individuals in the same field, and chemical control becomes challenging. Besides, Conyza species have evolved resistance to herbicides worldwide, particularly to glyphosate. Even though tillage is expected to provide weed-free fields, it negatively affects vineyards, causing erosion, loss of soil structure and a reduction in organic matter or vine growth (shallow roots can be affected), among other effects. Fuel consumption of this management is also very high because recurrent interventions of in-row tiller are required. In this context, bioherbicides, defined as environmentally friendly natural substances intended to reduce weed populations, are a potential tool for integrated weed management (IWM). In this work, the herbicidal effect of the following six products is tested on a glyphosate-resistant C. bonariensis population present in commercial vineyards: T1, mixture of acetic acid 20% and the fertilizer N32; T2, mixture of potassium metabisulfite and pelargonic acid 31%; T3, pelargonic acid 68%; T4, humic-fulvic acid 80%; T5, hydroxy phosphate complex; and T6, potassium metabisulfite. The results showed high field efficacy for T1 and T4 (>80% biomass reduction). For the rest of the products, high efficacy was obtained only in dose–response greenhouse experiments. The present work demonstrates the potential of certain bioherbicide compounds to manage herbicide-resistant weed species, such as C. bonariensis. Therefore, bioherbicides could be successfully incorporated into vineyards for IWM. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Compounds as Bioherbicide for an Eco-Friendly Agriculture)
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10 pages, 2119 KiB  
Article
Herbicidal Effects of Ethyl Acetate Extracts of Billygoat Weed (Ageratum conyzoides L.) on Spiny Amaranth (Amaranthus spinosus L.) Growth
by Gina Erida, Nurdin Saidi, Hasanuddin Hasanuddin and Syafruddin Syafruddin
Agronomy 2021, 11(10), 1991; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11101991 - 30 Sep 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2776
Abstract
This study aimed to evaluate the herbicidal activity of ethyl acetate leaf extract of Ageratum conyzoides L. at different subfractions on Amaranthus spinosus L. The leaves of A. conyzoides were sequentially extracted with n-hexane and ethyl acetate respectively and fractionated by chromatography [...] Read more.
This study aimed to evaluate the herbicidal activity of ethyl acetate leaf extract of Ageratum conyzoides L. at different subfractions on Amaranthus spinosus L. The leaves of A. conyzoides were sequentially extracted with n-hexane and ethyl acetate respectively and fractionated by chromatography column. The extracts were applied to A. spinosus in pot assays at a concentration of 5%, 10% and 15%. We applied A synthetic herbicide (2,4-D at 0.686 kg a.i. ha−1) for positive control and distilled water for negative control. The A. conyzoides extracts strongly differed in their effect on weed control, shoot and root dry weight and root length of A. spinosus. The most inhibition on A. spinosus growth caused by application of ethyl acetate of A. conyzoides extracts subfraction A by 10% concentration can cause 100% destruction and subfraction B were 95% which both of them cause strongest death on A. spinosus compared with synthetic herbicide (2, 4-D) (23.33%) at 1 Day After Application, while subfraction C and D were not effective. Main constituents identified by GC-MS in subfraction A extract were tetradecanoic acid, ethyl ester (10.26%), precocene II (9.39%), octadecanal (8.23%), 9,12,15-octatadecatrienoic, methyl ester (7.32%), 10-heneicosene (c,t) (5.19%) and neophytadiene (5.09%); in subfraction B were 1-octadecyne (38.57%), phytol (11.24%), di-tert-utylphosphine-d (5.17%) and 1-hexadecine (4.08%); in subfraction C were allobarbital (8.53%), octadecanal (12.69%), and bannamurpanin (26.01%) and octadecanal (30.52%), bannamurpanin (24.06%), 1,8-cineole (15.75%), trans-dodec-5enal (12.28%) and phytol (8.26%) in subfraction D. The ethyl acetate extract subfraction A and B concentration 10% proved the promising control agent against A. spinosus. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Compounds as Bioherbicide for an Eco-Friendly Agriculture)
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