Special Issue "Agricultural Water Conservation: Tools, Strategies, and Practices"

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395). This special issue belongs to the section "Water Use and Irrigation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Aliasghar Montazar
Website
Guest Editor
Irrigation and Water Management Advisor, University of California Agriculture and Natural Resources, 1050 E. Holton Rd. Holtville, CA 92250, USA
Interests: agricultural water management; drainage and water quality; on-farm water conservation; salinity management and control practices; environmental instrumentation and modeling
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Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

Water scarcity is a critical issue for agriculture, and hence, efficient management and conservation practices for agricultural water use are essential for adapting to and mitigating the impacts of current and future discrepancy between water supplies and water demands. This Special Issue focuses on “Agricultural Water Conservation: Tools, Strategies, and Practices”, which aims to bring together a collection of recent cutting-edge research and advancements in agricultural water conservation. The Special Issue intends to give a broad overview focusing on on-farm water conservation practices, advanced irrigation tools and water technologies, and best management practices and strategies for efficient water use in agriculture. Case studies and review papers which assess the current water management challenges and offer opportunities and potential actions for the improvement of future agricultural water conservation are welcome.

Dr. Aliasghar Montazar
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agronomy is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • advanced irrigation tools
  • deficit irrigation
  • optimal irrigation management
  • on-farm water conservation
  • precision water management
  • pressurized irrigation
  • low water-use and drought-tolerant crops

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Feeding Emitters for Microirrigation with a Digestate Liquid Fraction up to 25% Dilution Did Not Reduce Their Performance
Agronomy 2020, 10(8), 1150; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10081150 (registering DOI) - 06 Aug 2020
Abstract
Irrigation with wastewater can strongly contribute to the reduction of water abstraction in agriculture with an especial interest in arid and semiarid areas. However, its use can have drawbacks to both soil and micro-irrigation systems, especially when the total solids in the wastewater [...] Read more.
Irrigation with wastewater can strongly contribute to the reduction of water abstraction in agriculture with an especial interest in arid and semiarid areas. However, its use can have drawbacks to both soil and micro-irrigation systems, especially when the total solids in the wastewater are high, such as in digestate liquid fractions (DLF) from plant material. The aim of this study was thus to evaluate the performances of a serpentine shaped micro-emitter injected with a hydrocyclone filtered DLF (HF-DLF) from corn + barley biomass and evaluate the traits of the liquid released within a 8-h irrigation cycle. HF-DLF was injected at 10%, 25%, and 50% dilution compared to tap water (at pH = 7.84) and the system performances were measured. No clogging was found, which likely depended on both the shape of the emitter and the high-pressure head (200 kPa). HF-DLF dilution at 10%, 25%, and 50% consisted in +1.9%, +3.5, and −4.9% amount of liquid released compared to the control. Fluid temperature during irrigation (from 9:00 to 17:00) did not explain the difference in the released amounts of liquid. In 10% HF-DLF % and 25% HF-DLF, a pH difference of + 0.321 ± 0.014 pH units compared to the control was found, and such difference was constant for both dilutions and at increasing the time. In contrast, 50% HF-DLF increased pH by around a half point and such difference increased with time. Similar differences among treatments were found for the total solids in the liquid. These results indicate that 50% HF-DLF was accumulating materials in the serpentine. These results suggest that a low diluted HF-DLF could directly be injected in irrigation systems with few drawbacks for the irrigation system and contribute to water conservation since such wastewater are available from the late spring to the early fall, when water requirements are high. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agricultural Water Conservation: Tools, Strategies, and Practices)
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Open AccessArticle
Adoption of Water-Conserving Irrigation Practices among Row-Crop Growers in Mississippi, USA
Agronomy 2020, 10(8), 1083; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10081083 - 27 Jul 2020
Abstract
This article identifies irrigated row-crop farmer factors associated with the adoption of water-conserving practices. The analysis is performed on data from a survey of irrigators in Mississippi. Regression results show that the amount of irrigated area, years of education, perception of a groundwater [...] Read more.
This article identifies irrigated row-crop farmer factors associated with the adoption of water-conserving practices. The analysis is performed on data from a survey of irrigators in Mississippi. Regression results show that the amount of irrigated area, years of education, perception of a groundwater problem, and participation in conservation programs are positively associated with practice adoption; while number of years farming, growing rice, and pumping cost are negatively associated with adoption. However, not all factors are statistically significant for all practices. Survey results indicate that only a third of growers are aware of groundwater problems at the farm or state level; and this lack of awareness is related to whether farmers noticed a change in the depth to water distance in their irrigation wells. This evidence is consistent with a report to Congress from the Government Accountability Office (GAO) that recommends policies promoting the use of: (1) more efficient irrigation technology and practices and (2) precision agriculture technologies, such as soil moisture sensors and irrigation automation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agricultural Water Conservation: Tools, Strategies, and Practices)
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