Improving Agricultural Water Productivity to Ensure Food Security under Changing Environments—Second Edition

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395). This special issue belongs to the section "Water Use and Irrigation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2024 | Viewed by 2422

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
LEAF-Linking Landscape, Environment, Agriculture and Food-Research Center, Associated Laboratory TERRA, Instituto Superior de Agronomia, Universidade de Lisboa, Tapada da Ajuda, 1349-017 Lisbon, Portugal
Interests: irrigation requirements; irrigation management; on-farm irrigation systems; irrigation districts; environmental impacts of irrigation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Research Center on Landscape, Environment, Agriculture and Food (LEAF), School of Agriculture (ISA), University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal
Interests: crop and reference evapotranspiration; crop water requirements; irrigation management; modelling; water–yield relations; coping with water scarcity
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The agriculture sector uses the most water globally, accounting for about 70% of freshwater withdrawals. Most of this water is used in irrigation, especially in arid and semi-arid regions where water scarcity predominates. It is expected that these conditions will be aggravated under a climate change context. Population growth associated with the increased demand for food further exacerbates the need for increasing agricultural water productivity. It is thus critical to improve the understanding of the driving processes influencing the sustainable use of water and to implement innovative water management practices and strategies to mitigate climate variability while contributing to control soil salinization and sodicity as well as nutrient leaching to water bodies. To improve the resilience of irrigated agriculture, it is paramount to design and implement integrated and sustainable water-management and water-saving practices, and to adapt cropping systems and crop management practices while synergistically improving yields, water productivity, and economic benefits. The need for implementing water-saving and sustainable practices, supporting stakeholder and policymaker decisions, is particularly important in agricultural areas characterized by a decreased water availability.

The main goal of this Special Issue is to publish high-quality research articles addressing recent developments in feasible, integrative, and synergistic practices and approaches at diverse scales such as crop, farm, and irrigation schemes, contributing to improving water productivity. Topics such as deficit irrigation, water harvesting, soil–water conservation practices, improved irrigation systems, diversified cropping systems, alternative water resources, irrigation water delivery, and others will be considered for inclusion in this Special Issue.

Dr. Maria do Rosario Cameira
Dr. Paula Paredes
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agronomy is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • crop physical and economic water productivity indicators
  • improved irrigation systems
  • water-saving practices and technologies
  • irrigation water delivery
  • sustainable crop and water management
  • irrigation scheduling
  • climate variability and climate change
  • droughts
  • decision support systems
  • water management tools
  • food security
  • remote sensing
  • precision irrigation
  • adaptation practices to cope with soil salinity

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

19 pages, 4577 KiB  
Article
Moving toward the Biophysical Characterization of the Mangrove Swamp Rice Production System in Guinea Bissau: Exploring Tools to Improve Soil- and Water-Use Efficiencies
by Gabriel Garbanzo, Jesus Céspedes, Joseph Sandoval, Marina Temudo, Paula Paredes and Maria do Rosário Cameira
Agronomy 2024, 14(2), 335; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy14020335 - 6 Feb 2024
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 902
Abstract
The mangrove swamp rice production system (MSRPS) in West Africa faces significant challenges in soil, water, and salinity management, making rice production highly vulnerable to variations in the spatio-temporal distribution patterns of rainfall, which are exacerbated by climate change. This study’s results can [...] Read more.
The mangrove swamp rice production system (MSRPS) in West Africa faces significant challenges in soil, water, and salinity management, making rice production highly vulnerable to variations in the spatio-temporal distribution patterns of rainfall, which are exacerbated by climate change. This study’s results can provide the initial basis for co-developing strategies with farmers aiming to contribute to the biophysical characterization of the MSRPS, in particular: (i) estimate the water-harvesting efficiency (WLef) of the plots in the north and south of Guinea Bissau (GB); (ii) characterize the unevenness of the bottom of the plots, which leads to salinization spots; and (iii) create soil consistency maps to provide farmers with a tool to prioritize sites with optimal conditions for tillage. The research was conducted between 2021 and 2023 in the study site of Cafine-Cafal in the south and Elalab in the north of GB. Systematic soil sampling in a grid was designed to quantify the soil consistency and plot/ridge areas were determined. Linear models were developed to predict biophysical parameters (e.g., effective planting areas and water-logging depths) and geostatistics were used to create soil consistency maps for each study site. The results show precipitation water-harvesting efficiencies of 15% and 16% for the southern and northern regions, respectively. Furthermore, the plasticity limits of 18.6% for Elalab and 35.5% for Cafine-Cafal show the most appropriate times to start tillage in specific areas of the paddies. This study provides information on the efficient management of tillage and freshwater conservation, providing MSRPS farmers with useful tools to counteract the effects caused by salinity and rainfall variability. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

29 pages, 4115 KiB  
Review
The Mangrove Swamp Rice Production System of Guinea Bissau: Identification of the Main Constraints Associated with Soil Salinity and Rainfall Variability
by Gabriel Garbanzo, Maria do Rosário Cameira and Paula Paredes
Agronomy 2024, 14(3), 468; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy14030468 - 27 Feb 2024
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1237
Abstract
Mangrove swamp rice production (MSRP) refers to rice cultivation in former mangrove soils that have been anthropogenically modified for food production. The method utilizes the largest possible storage of fresh water to desalinate the soils and make them productive. However, temporal variability in [...] Read more.
Mangrove swamp rice production (MSRP) refers to rice cultivation in former mangrove soils that have been anthropogenically modified for food production. The method utilizes the largest possible storage of fresh water to desalinate the soils and make them productive. However, temporal variability in rainfall patterns causes loss of efficiency in production, impacting crop growth and reducing productivity. To improve MSRP, it is necessary to identify the primary constraints associated with salinity, enhancing and maximizing freshwater storage efficiency and water productivity. This study provides a general description of the MSRP system in both the northern and southern regions of Guinea-Bissau, aiming at the identification of the main water management limitations. The description involves the use of typologies and the identification of zones with specific characteristics within the paddies. Furthermore, this review includes an analysis of the physicochemical characteristics of soils in relation to salinity issues, descriptions of agronomic management, rice varieties, and the significance of managing dikes and bunds to improve mangrove swamp rice water management. This study shows how the MSRPS is characterized by dynamism and complexity, involving a wide range of constraints associated with salinity features, cultural influences, and microclimatic conditions that are subject to temporal variations. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop