Legume-Rhizobial Symbiosis under Stress Conditions

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395). This special issue belongs to the section "Soil and Plant Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 March 2024) | Viewed by 1081

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Biotechnology, All-Russia Research Institute for Agricultural Microbiology, Saint Petersburg 196608, Russia
Interests: cell biology of plant‒microbe interactions; legume‒rhizobial symbiosis; plant‒microbe interface
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biotechnology, All-Russia Research Institute for Agricultural Microbiology, Saint Petersburg 196608, Russia
Interests: genetics and cell biology of plant‒microbe interactions; legume‒rhizobial symbiosis; legume‒mycorrhizal symbiosis
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Legume‒rhizobial symbiosis is the most important association between plants and microorganisms, and is used in agriculture. The genetic and molecular mechanisms of development of legume‒rhizobial symbiosis have been actively studied in recent decades, and significant progress has been made in their understanding. However, this mutual interaction appears to be sensitive to various stresses. Therefore, revealing the mechanisms of adaptation of symbiotic nodules to stressful conditions is one of the most important tasks. In this Issue, we invite you to submit papers describing the effects of abiotic and biotic stresses on legume‒rhizobial symbiosis on organism, histological, cellular, and transcriptional levels.

Submissions on the following topics (but not limited to) are invited: 1) Symbiotic nodules and oxidative stress; 2) Impact of heavy metals on legume‒rhizobial symbiosis; 3) Symbiotic nodules and pesticides; 4) Biotic stresses and nitrogen-fixing nodules; 5) Global warming, drought, and nitrogen fixation; 6) Nitrogen-fixing nodules and salt stress. Original research papers, methods, reviews, and short communications are welcome.

Dr. Anna Tsyganova
Dr. Viktor E. Tsyganov
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • crop legume
  • symbiotic nodule
  • reactive oxygen species
  • heavy metals
  • pesticides
  • high temperature
  • salt stress

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

17 pages, 3214 KiB  
Article
Molecular Mechanism of Exogenous Magnesium in Regulating Cation Homeostasis in Roots of Peanut Seedlings under Salt Stress
by Rongjin Wang, Xuan Dong, Yan Gao, Fei Hao, Hui Zhang and Guolin Lin
Agronomy 2024, 14(4), 724; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy14040724 - 1 Apr 2024
Viewed by 746
Abstract
Salt stress seriously hinders the normal growth of plant seedling roots. Magnesium, as one of the essential medium elements for plant growth, can effectively alleviate the damage of salt stress to plant roots, but the key genes involved and their mechanism are still [...] Read more.
Salt stress seriously hinders the normal growth of plant seedling roots. Magnesium, as one of the essential medium elements for plant growth, can effectively alleviate the damage of salt stress to plant roots, but the key genes involved and their mechanism are still unclear. The purpose of this study was to explore the related molecular mechanism of exogenous magnesium regulating cation homeostasis in peanut seedlings under salt stress. Firstly, according to plant physiology experiments, it was found that exogenous magnesium treatment significantly improved the tolerance of peanut seedlings to salt stress. After that, the transcriptome data were integrated, and further gene expression analysis showed that the expression of genes such as CNGC1, NCLs, and NHX7 was regulated under exogenous magnesium treatment, which effectively reduced the accumulation of sodium ions in cells. At the same time, exogenous magnesium also regulates the expression of genes such as ACAs and POTs and maintains the homeostasis of calcium and potassium ions in cells. These results reveal the molecular mechanism of exogenous magnesium regulating the cation homeostasis of peanut seedlings under salt stress, which provides an important reference for further revealing the key genes of salt tolerance in plants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Legume-Rhizobial Symbiosis under Stress Conditions)
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