Conservation Agriculture as a Key Challenge for Sustainable Agroecosystems in Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation - Series II

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395). This special issue belongs to the section "Farming Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2023) | Viewed by 5707

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Guest Editor
Faculty of Agrobiotechnical Sciences Osijek, University of J.J.Strossmayer in Osijek, Vladimira Preloga 1, 31000 Osijek, Croatia
Interests: conservation agriculture; soils and crop management; agroclimatology; sustainable land management; cropping systems; cover cropping; multidisciplinary approach to the application of reduced and conservation soil tillage in crop production in average and specific agroecological conditions; study of influence of reduced and conservation soil tillage on the biological, mechanical, chemical, nutritional, organizational and economical parameters
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Guest Editor
Faculty of Agriculture Novi Sad, University of Novi Sad, 21000 Novi Sad, Serbia
Interests: agroecology; conservation agriculture; sustainable land management; cropping systems; soil tillage; cover crops and organic agriculture
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Faculty of Agriculture and Biotechnology, Bydgoszcz University of Science and Technology, J.J.Śniadeckich in Bydgoszcz, Kaliskiego 7, 85-796 Bydgoszcz, Poland
Interests: assessment of the possibility of simplifying the cultivation of root crops through the use of strip tillage and mulching of soil with catch crops biomass; the possibility of improving the cultivation technology of spring wheat and spring barley grown in a cereal crop rotation; improving of seed sowing techniques through furrow sowing
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Modern agricultural production is based on sustainable principles which imply harmonization between (agro)environment and yields. Nowadays, more than ever, crop production is faced with many different challenges and predominantly with climate changes. Conservation agriculture has potential to be an adequate solution and one of the possible ways to prevail primarily negative influence of climatic changes. Basic conservation agriculture principles (minimal soil disturbance, permanent soil cover and crop diversification) can have positive effect on many others key elements of crop production (crop nutrition, soil matters, irrigation, crop breeding, crop protection, environmental considerations, etc.). Soil tillage affects many soil quality aspects and as soil tillage is closer to conservation agriculture principles, it can be expected less damages and potential problems and risks. We kindly encourage and invite experts and researchers to contribute to our Special Issue with original and innovative research and reviews covering all issues related to conservation agriculture in ever-changing (agro)environment.

Prof. Dr. Danijel Jug
Dr. Srdjan Seremesic
Dr. Edward Wilczewski
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • conservation soil tillage
  • sustainability
  • mulching
  • cover crop
  • climate change
  • agro-ecosystems resilience
  • agroecology
  • crop production
  • crop modeling
  • food security

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

27 pages, 4709 KiB  
Article
Effects of Combined Long-Term Straw Return and Nitrogen Fertilization on Wheat Productivity and Soil Properties in the Wheat-Maize-Soybean Rotation System in the Pannonian Plain
by Goran Jaćimović, Vladimir Aćin, Milan Mirosavljević, Ljiljana Brbaklić, Svetlana Vujić, Dušan Dunđerski and Srđan Šeremešić
Agronomy 2023, 13(6), 1529; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy13061529 - 31 May 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1558
Abstract
The study, conducted to evaluate the effects of long-term straw management combined with the application of increasing nitrogen rates on the yield of twenty winter wheat varieties, as well as on soil properties, was carried out in a long-term field trial established in [...] Read more.
The study, conducted to evaluate the effects of long-term straw management combined with the application of increasing nitrogen rates on the yield of twenty winter wheat varieties, as well as on soil properties, was carried out in a long-term field trial established in 1971. The trial was monitored for twenty growing seasons under rainfed conditions in a typical chernozem zone of the southern part of the Pannonian Plain. The cropping system was a winter wheat-maize-soybean rotation. The ten SN-treatments (combinations of straw management (S) and N-fertilization) were as follows: In the plot (treatment) with straw return (S1), seven variants of nitrogen fertilization (0–180 kg N ha−1) were included, while on the plot without straw return (S0) the variants of N-fertilization were 0, 90 and 150 kg N ha−l. Based on the high relative share in the total sum of squares, variance analysis showed that wheat grain yield (GY) was significantly affected by years, SN-treatments, and their interaction, and they can explain the largest part of the total variance of GY. The results showed that straw return integrated with N fertilization could increase wheat yield to varying degrees over 20 years. On average, for all years, the highest GYs were obtained in the treatment S1 and fertilization with 180 and 150 kg N ha−1. The overall results showed that long-term straw returning significantly increased GY by an average of 8.4 ± 4.5%, with a considerable simultaneous increase in yield stability compared to straw removal. In addition, straw incorporation (SI) significantly increased soil humus, total nitrogen (TN), and soil organic carbon (SOC) contents at a soil depth of 0–30 cm by an average of 4.2, 3.8, and 11.3%, respectively. The results of our study have demonstrated that the long-term practice of straw return, in combination with the application of mineral fertilizers, has the potential to serve as a sustainable soil management strategy that is economically viable and environmentally acceptable. However, additional research is required to investigate its interactive effects on both grain yield and soil productivity. Full article
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21 pages, 1848 KiB  
Article
Initial Weed and Maize Response to Conservation Tillage and Liming in Different Agroecological Conditions
by Bojana Brozović, Irena Jug, Boris Đurđević, Marija Ravlić, Vesna Vukadinović, Iva Rojnica and Danijel Jug
Agronomy 2023, 13(4), 1116; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy13041116 - 14 Apr 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1292
Abstract
Conservation tillage (CT) is an effective tool for maintaining crop productivity under adverse climate conditions, while its adoption is conditioned by the possible negative response of crop weed. Research with CT and liming (L) was conducted at different experimental sites on acid soils [...] Read more.
Conservation tillage (CT) is an effective tool for maintaining crop productivity under adverse climate conditions, while its adoption is conditioned by the possible negative response of crop weed. Research with CT and liming (L) was conducted at different experimental sites on acid soils (ES 1 and ES 2) to determine the maize weediness and yield. The tillage treatments used were ST (conventional tillage), CTD (deep loosening), CTS (shallow loosening), and liming; Ly (CaO) and Ln (no CaO). The weediness assessment was conducted at the V7 and R5 maize growth stages. Weed density (WD), biomass (WB), weed coverage (WC), and species density (WSN) were determined. The highest WD was recorded on ES 2 in V7, and WB, WC, and WSN were significantly higher at CTS in R5 compared to ST. Liming affected the decrease of WD and WC in V7 and WB, WC, and WSN in R5. The average maize yield on ES 2 was 36% higher compared to ES 1. CTS resulted with the highest yield at ES 1, while at ES 2, it was similar to ST. Liming application significantly increased the maize yield. The given results indicated the positive impact of CT and L on crop productivity in different agroecological conditions, despite the increased weediness. Full article
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18 pages, 3291 KiB  
Article
The Effects of Winter Cover Crops on Maize Yield and Crop Performance in Semiarid Conditions—Artificial Neural Network Approach
by Bojan Vojnov, Goran Jaćimović, Srđan Šeremešić, Lato Pezo, Biljana Lončar, Đorđe Krstić, Svetlana Vujić and Branko Ćupina
Agronomy 2022, 12(11), 2670; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy12112670 - 28 Oct 2022
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 2321
Abstract
Maize is the most widespread and, along with wheat, the most important staple crop in the Republic of Serbia, which is of great significance for ensuring national food security. With the increasing demand for food and forage, intensive agricultural practices have been adopted [...] Read more.
Maize is the most widespread and, along with wheat, the most important staple crop in the Republic of Serbia, which is of great significance for ensuring national food security. With the increasing demand for food and forage, intensive agricultural practices have been adopted in the maize production systems. In this direction, considerable research efforts have been made to examine the effects of different types of cover crops as a green manure on maize productivity; however, no consistent conclusions have been reached so far. Therefore, the objective of the present study is to examine the possibility of predicting the effects of winter cover crops (CC) integrated with different management practices on the morphological traits, yield, and yield components of maize. The experiment was carried out on chernozem soil from 2016 to 2020 as a randomized complete block design arranged as a split-split-plot with three replicates. The pea as a sole crop (P) and the mixture of pea and triticale (PT) are sown as winter CC with the following subplots: (i) CC used as green manure, and (ii) CC used as forage and removed before maize sowing. The artificial neural network is used for exploring nonlinear functions of the tested parameters and 13 categorical input variables for modeling according to the following factors: CC, way of using CC, N fertilization, and year. The computed maximums of plant height, number of leaves, number of internodes, plant density, number of ears, grain yield, 1000-grain weight, hectolitre weight, dry matter harvest residue, harvest index, leaves percentage, stems percentage, and ears percentage are as follows: 232.3 cm; 9.7; 10.2; 54,340 plants ha−1; 0.9; 9.8 t ha−1; 272.4 g; 67.0 kg HL−1; 9.2 t ha−1; 0.52; 18.9%; 36.0%, and 45.1%, respectively. The optimal result is obtained with peas used as green manure, with 50 kg N ha−1 and in the climatic conditions of 2018. Consequently, maize production under subsequent sowing periods can be successfully optimized by adapting selected management options for higher yield accomplishment. Full article
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