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Tour. Hosp., Volume 2, Issue 3 (September 2021) – 3 articles

Cover Story (view full-size image): This paper examines how and why edible food ends up as waste at various stages of the production and service cycle in luxury hotels. The findings show that the importance of waste prevention is widely recognised among staff, but it is viewed as risky because it may compromise hedonistic hospitality experiences and undermine the corporate brand image. Consequently, edible, nutritious food is rendered ‘unusable’; therefore, food waste is rationalised and normalised. The findings suggest that corporate social responsibility policies and international luxury brand standards interact to disrupt pro-environmental action in the workplace. Hence, integrated control systems and cross organisational policies and practices are required to prevent waste from developing during food procurement, storage, preparation and service. View this paper.
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Article
CSR Communication among Tourism SMEs through Their Websites
Tour. Hosp. 2021, 2(3), 319-326; https://doi.org/10.3390/tourhosp2030020 - 19 Aug 2021
Viewed by 1332
Abstract
Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) in tourism are increasingly communicating their Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) initiatives via their websites to build a positive image and promote customer relationships. This study examined such CSR engagement and communications by tourism SMEs in Nepal based on [...] Read more.
Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) in tourism are increasingly communicating their Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) initiatives via their websites to build a positive image and promote customer relationships. This study examined such CSR engagement and communications by tourism SMEs in Nepal based on qualitative analysis of website content and in-depth interviews. Google search engine was used to select SMEs, and textual data were extracted from their websites. Following data saturation, a review of twenty-five websites was initially compared, and the obtained information was subsequently evaluated with information provided through individual interviews. Overall, CSR activities were largely practiced at a philanthropic level, and to some extent, at an ethical level. SMEs were primarily focused on activities related to social and environmental issues within the communities in which they operate. The results of this exploratory study provide an initial assessment of CSR among tourism SMEs in Nepal and could assist tourism associations/organizations with initiatives. Full article
Article
Food Waste Drivers in Corporate Luxury Hotels: Competing Perceptions and Priorities across the Service Cycle
Tour. Hosp. 2021, 2(3), 302-318; https://doi.org/10.3390/tourhosp2030019 - 09 Jul 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1677
Abstract
Drawing on data gathered through semi-structured interviews, participant observation and document analysis at five-star hotels in UK and Germany, this paper examines the competing pressures driving waste generation and prevention at different stages in the food production and service cycle. Primary data indicated [...] Read more.
Drawing on data gathered through semi-structured interviews, participant observation and document analysis at five-star hotels in UK and Germany, this paper examines the competing pressures driving waste generation and prevention at different stages in the food production and service cycle. Primary data indicated that senior managers recognised the potential savings that could be achieved by preventing food waste. Despite this, many wasteful practices were normalised within routine operations. This was partly attributed to the corporatised business model and brand strategy in which premium pricing and luxury experiential propositions potentially transformed food waste reduction strategies into sources of risk. Past research generally categorised food as being edible or inedible. In contrast, the terms usable/unusable are proposed and this paper discusses how corporatised practices and value propositions rendered usable foods unusable. It considers how this type of corporate system frames waste problems and thus solutions, leading to various consequences. The discussion also explores how those systems shaped the organisational culture and the agency of staff who engaged with the service cycle at and across multiple points. The findings of this paper are based on primary data collected from a small number of corporately governed luxury hotels. Consequently, the closing parts of this paper outline how the insights generated here could be applied to the study of alternative organisational arrangements and operational types. Full article
Article
The Effect of IMC of Golf Product Exhibitions on Customer Behavior and Recommendation Intention
Tour. Hosp. 2021, 2(3), 288-301; https://doi.org/10.3390/tourhosp2030018 - 02 Jul 2021
Viewed by 1213
Abstract
The aim of this study was to present strategic measures for the sustainability of exhibitions and fairs by examining the relationship between integrated marketing communication (IMC) and the customer behavior and recommendation intentions of the participants who attended golf exhibitions and fairs. To [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to present strategic measures for the sustainability of exhibitions and fairs by examining the relationship between integrated marketing communication (IMC) and the customer behavior and recommendation intentions of the participants who attended golf exhibitions and fairs. To achieve this aim, we conducted a literature review of IMC to formulate a hypothesis; next, we administered a questionnaire to 256 participants at the exhibitions and fairs related to golf equipment. The results show that the two-way communication of the exhibition and fair was positive for the customer’s continuous purchase intention, purchase behavior, and long-term relationship orientation, and the purchase behavior and long-term relationship orientation had a positive effect on the continuous recommendation intention. Full article
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