Next Issue
Previous Issue

Table of Contents

Foods, Volume 7, Issue 1 (January 2018)

  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Readerexternal link to open them.
Cover Story (view full-size image) In this study, time and temperature were optimized during microwave processing to obtain soymilk [...] Read more.
View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-10
Export citation of selected articles as:
Open AccessEditorial Acknowledgement to Reviewers of Foods in 2017
Received: 22 January 2018 / Revised: 22 January 2018 / Accepted: 22 January 2018 / Published: 22 January 2018
PDF Full-text (317 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Peer review is an essential part in the publication process, ensuring that Foods maintains high quality standards for its published papers [...]
Full article
Open AccessArticle The Effect of Emulsion Intensity on Selected Sensory and Instrumental Texture Properties of Full-Fat Mayonnaise
Received: 13 November 2017 / Revised: 11 January 2018 / Accepted: 12 January 2018 / Published: 17 January 2018
PDF Full-text (1877 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Varying processing conditions can strongly affect the microstructure of mayonnaise, opening up new applications for the creation of products tailored to meet different consumer preferences. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of emulsification intensity on sensory and instrumental characteristics
[...] Read more.
Varying processing conditions can strongly affect the microstructure of mayonnaise, opening up new applications for the creation of products tailored to meet different consumer preferences. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of emulsification intensity on sensory and instrumental characteristics of full-fat mayonnaise. Mayonnaise, based on a standard recipe, was processed at low and high emulsification intensities, with selected sensory and instrumental properties then evaluated using an analytical panel and a back extrusion method. The evaluation also included a commercial reference mayonnaise. The overall effects of a higher emulsification intensity on the sensory and instrumental characteristics of full-fat mayonnaise were limited. However, texture was affected, with a more intense emulsification resulting in a firmer mayonnaise according to both back extrusion data and the analytical sensory panel. Appearance, taste and flavor attributes were not affected by processing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Analysis of Sensory Properties in Foods)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Absorption and Metabolism of Phenolics from Digests of Polyphenol-Rich Potato Extracts Using the Caco-2/HepG2 Co-Culture System
Received: 1 December 2017 / Revised: 23 December 2017 / Accepted: 9 January 2018 / Published: 12 January 2018
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (240 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The bioactivity of dietary polyphenols depends upon gastrointestinal and hepatic metabolism of secondary microbial phenolic metabolites generated via colonic microbiota-mediated biotransformation. A polyphenol-rich potato extract (PRPE) containing chlorogenic, caffeic, and ferulic acids and rutin was digested in a dynamic multi-reactor gastrointestinal simulator of
[...] Read more.
The bioactivity of dietary polyphenols depends upon gastrointestinal and hepatic metabolism of secondary microbial phenolic metabolites generated via colonic microbiota-mediated biotransformation. A polyphenol-rich potato extract (PRPE) containing chlorogenic, caffeic, and ferulic acids and rutin was digested in a dynamic multi-reactor gastrointestinal simulator of the human intestinal microbial ecosystem (GI model). Simulated digestion showed extensive degradation of the parent compounds and the generation of microbial phenolic metabolites. To characterize the transport and metabolism of microbial phenolic metabolites following digestion, a co-culture of intestinal Caco-2 and hepatic HepG2 cells was exposed to the PRPE-derived digests obtained from the colonic vessels. Following a 2 h incubation of the digesta with the Caco-2/HepG2 co-cultures, approximately 10–15% of ferulic, dihydrocaffeic, and dihydroferulic acids and 3–5% of 3-hydroxybenzoic, 3-hydroxyphenylpropionic, and coumaric acids were observed in the basolateral side, whereas 3-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, phenylpropanoic acid, and cinnamic acid were not detected. Subsequent HepG2 cellular metabolism led to major increases in ferulic, dihydrocaffeic, 3-hydroxyphenylpropionic, and coumaric acids ranging from 160–370%. These findings highlight the importance of hepatic metabolism towards the generation of secondary metabolites of polyphenols despite low selective Caco-2 cellular uptake of microbial phenolic metabolites. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Food Function and Nutrition)
Open AccessArticle Comparison of Conventional and Microwave Treatment on Soymilk for Inactivation of Trypsin Inhibitors and In Vitro Protein Digestibility
Received: 12 December 2017 / Revised: 22 December 2017 / Accepted: 27 December 2017 / Published: 8 January 2018
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (7191 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Soymilk is lower in calories compared to cow’s milk, since it is derived from a plant source (no cholesterol) and is an excellent source of protein. Despite the beneficial factors, soymilk is considered as one of the most controversial foods in the world.
[...] Read more.
Soymilk is lower in calories compared to cow’s milk, since it is derived from a plant source (no cholesterol) and is an excellent source of protein. Despite the beneficial factors, soymilk is considered as one of the most controversial foods in the world. It contains serine protease inhibitors which lower its nutritional value and digestibility. Processing techniques for the elimination of trypsin inhibitors and lipoxygenase, which have shorter processing time and lower production costs are required for the large-scale manufacturing of soymilk. In this study, the suitable conditions of time and temperature are optimized during microwave processing to obtain soymilk with maximum digestibility with inactivation of trypsin inhibitors, in comparison to the conventional thermal treatment. The microwave processing conditions at a frequency of 2.45 GHz and temperatures of 70 °C, 85 °C and 100 °C for 2, 5 and 8 min were investigated and were compared to conventional thermal treatments at the same temperature for 10, 20 and 30 min. Response surface methodology is used to design and optimize the experimental conditions. Thermal processing was able to increase digestibility by 7% (microwave) and 11% (conventional) compared to control, while trypsin inhibitor activity reduced to 1% in microwave processing and 3% in conventional thermal treatment when compared to 10% in raw soybean. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Proteins and Bioactive Peptides) Printed Edition available
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Thyme and Savory Essential Oil Vapor Treatments Control Brown Rot and Improve the Storage Quality of Peaches and Nectarines, but Could Favor Gray Mold
Received: 6 November 2017 / Revised: 6 December 2017 / Accepted: 28 December 2017 / Published: 5 January 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1379 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The effect of biofumigation, through slow-release diffusors, of thyme and savory essential oils (EO), was evaluated on the control of postharvest diseases and quality of peaches and nectarines. EO fumigation was effective in controlling postharvest rots. Naturally contaminated peaches and nectarines were exposed
[...] Read more.
The effect of biofumigation, through slow-release diffusors, of thyme and savory essential oils (EO), was evaluated on the control of postharvest diseases and quality of peaches and nectarines. EO fumigation was effective in controlling postharvest rots. Naturally contaminated peaches and nectarines were exposed to EO vapors for 28 days at 0 °C in sealed storage cabinets and then exposed at 20 °C for five days during shelf-life in normal atmosphere, simulating retail conditions. Under low disease pressure, most treatments significantly reduced fruit rot incidence during shelf-life, while, under high disease pressure, only vapors of thyme essential oil at the highest concentration tested (10% v/v in the diffusor) significantly reduced the rots. The application of thyme or savory EO favored a reduction of brown rot incidence, caused by Monilinia fructicola, but increased gray mold, caused by Botrytis cinerea. In vitro tests confirmed that M. fructicola was more sensitive to EO vapors than B. cinerea. Essential oil volatile components were characterized in storage cabinets during postharvest. The antifungal components of the essential oils increased during storage, but they were a low fraction of the volatile organic compounds in storage chambers. EO vapors did not influence the overall quality of the fruit, but showed a positive effect in reducing weight loss and in maintaining ascorbic acid and carotenoid content. The application of thyme and savory essential oil vapors represents a promising tool for reducing postharvest losses and preserving the quality of peaches and nectarines. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of Essential Oils in Food Systems) Printed Edition available
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Protein Determination—Method Matters
Received: 15 November 2017 / Revised: 13 December 2017 / Accepted: 28 December 2017 / Published: 1 January 2018
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (194 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The reported protein content of foods depends on the analytical method used for determination, making a direct comparison between studies difficult. The aim of this study was to examine and compare protein analytical methods. Some of these methods require extraction preceding analysis. The
[...] Read more.
The reported protein content of foods depends on the analytical method used for determination, making a direct comparison between studies difficult. The aim of this study was to examine and compare protein analytical methods. Some of these methods require extraction preceding analysis. The efficacy of protein extraction differs depending on food matrices and thus extraction yield was determined. Overall, most analytical methods overestimated the protein contents. The inaccuracies were linked to indirect measurements, i.e. nitrogen determination and subsequent conversion to protein, or interference from other chemical substances. Amino acid analysis is the only protein analysis method where interfering substances do not affect the results. Although there is potential for improvement in regards to the hydrolysis method, we recommend that this method should be the preferred for food protein determination. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Proteins and Bioactive Peptides) Printed Edition available
Open AccessReview Effects of Cold Plasma on Food Quality: A Review
Received: 7 November 2017 / Revised: 12 December 2017 / Accepted: 18 December 2017 / Published: 1 January 2018
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (644 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Cold plasma (CP) technology has proven very effective as an alternative tool for food decontamination and shelf-life extension. The impact of CP on food quality is very crucial for its acceptance as an alternative food processing technology. Due to the non-thermal nature, CP
[...] Read more.
Cold plasma (CP) technology has proven very effective as an alternative tool for food decontamination and shelf-life extension. The impact of CP on food quality is very crucial for its acceptance as an alternative food processing technology. Due to the non-thermal nature, CP treatments have shown no or minimal impacts on the physical, chemical, nutritional and sensory attributes of various products. This review also discusses the negative impacts and limitations posed by CP technology for food products. The limited studies on interactions of CP species with food components at the molecular level offers future research opportunities. It also highlights the need for optimization studies to mitigate the negative impacts on visual, chemical, nutritional and functional properties of food products. The design versatility, non-thermal, economical and environmentally friendly nature of CP offers unique advantages over traditional processing technologies. However, CP processing is still in its nascent form and needs further research to reach its potential. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nonthermal Modification of Food Structure and Functionality)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Determination of Vitamin E in Cereal Products and Biscuits by GC-FID
Received: 13 September 2017 / Revised: 13 December 2017 / Accepted: 14 December 2017 / Published: 1 January 2018
PDF Full-text (536 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A rapid, precise and accurate method for the determination of vitamin E (α-tocopherol) in cereal products and biscuits has been developed. The uncertainty was calculated for the first time, and the methods were performed for different cereal products and biscuits, characterized as “superfoods”.
[...] Read more.
A rapid, precise and accurate method for the determination of vitamin E (α-tocopherol) in cereal products and biscuits has been developed. The uncertainty was calculated for the first time, and the methods were performed for different cereal products and biscuits, characterized as “superfoods”. The limits of detection and quantification were calculated. The accuracy and precision were estimated using the certified reference material FAPAS T10112QC, and the determined values were in good accordance with the certified values. The health claims according to the daily reference values for vitamin E were calculated, and the results proved that the majority of the samples examined showed a percentage daily value higher than 15%. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessDiscussion Food Composition Databases: Considerations about Complex Food Matrices
Received: 27 October 2017 / Revised: 24 November 2017 / Accepted: 13 December 2017 / Published: 1 January 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (191 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Nowadays, many countries have their own national Food Composition Databases, whose continuous updating allows the inclusion of a large number of foods, reflecting the food habits of the population and the growing number of foods on the market in the best way possible.
[...] Read more.
Nowadays, many countries have their own national Food Composition Databases, whose continuous updating allows the inclusion of a large number of foods, reflecting the food habits of the population and the growing number of foods on the market in the best way possible. Therefore, particular attention should be directed to the study not only of individual foods or food components but also of the nutritional characteristics of dishes, meals and diets, as they are really consumed. Recently, a reviewed sensitivity in Europe towards the implementation of standardized procedures for generating reliable composition data for composite dishes has been carried out. Although direct chemical analysis is the most accurate method to determine food composition, the nutrient content of complex matrices and composite dishes is often calculated from the nutrient contents of the individual ingredients, considering the different thermal treatments and using some preparation factors. In this context, this paper aims to give an updated picture on Food Composition Databases; in particular, their application regarding complex matrices is examined together with the need to optimize their calculated nutritional values. Results obtained by this calculation should almost always be observed as approximations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Reformulation and Innovation for Human Health)
Open AccessArticle A Comparison Study of Quality Attributes of Ground Beef and Veal Patties and Thermal Inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 after Double Pan-Broiling Under Dynamic Conditions
Received: 16 October 2017 / Revised: 7 December 2017 / Accepted: 22 December 2017 / Published: 26 December 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1053 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This study compared the quality variation and thermal inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in non-intact beef and veal. Coarse ground beef and veal patties (2.1 cm thick, 12.4 cm diameter, 180 g) inoculated with E. coli O157:H7, aerobically stored before double pan-broiling for
[...] Read more.
This study compared the quality variation and thermal inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in non-intact beef and veal. Coarse ground beef and veal patties (2.1 cm thick, 12.4 cm diameter, 180 g) inoculated with E. coli O157:H7, aerobically stored before double pan-broiling for 0–360 s without rest or to 55, 62.5, 71.1, and 76 °C (internal temperature) with 0.5- or 3.5-min rest. Microbial population and qualities including color, cooking losses, pH, water activity, fat, and moisture content, were tested. After cooking the beef and veal patties, the weight losses were 17.83–29%, the pH increased from 5.53–5.60 to 5.74–6.09, the moisture content decreased from 70.53–76.02% to 62.60–67.07%, and the fat content increased (p < 0.05) from 2.19–6.46% to 2.92–9.45%. Cooking beef and veal samples with increasing internal temperatures decreased a* and b* values and increased the L* value. Escherichia coli O157:H7 was more sensitive to heat in veal compared to beef with shorter D-value and “shoulder” time. Cooking to 71.1 and 76 °C reduced E. coli O157:H7 by >6 log CFU/g regardless of rest time. Cooking to 55 °C and 62.5 °C with a 3.5-min rest achieved an additional 1–3 log CFU/g reduction compared to the 0.5-min rest. Results should be useful for developing risk assessment of non-intact beef and veal products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Quality and Safety of Meat Products)
Figures

Figure 1

Back to Top