Special Issue "Sensory and Working Memory: Stimulus Encoding, Storage, and Retrieval"

A special issue of Vision (ISSN 2411-5150).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Haluk Öǧmen
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Daniel Felix Ritchie School of Engineering & Computer Science, University of Denver, Denver, CO, USA
Interests: Neuro-engineering; vision; visual psychophysics; visual memory; attention; computational neuroscience.
Dr. Srimant Tripathy
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Optometry and Vision Science, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Bradford, Bradford, West Yorkshire, England
Interests: visual perception; motion perception; attention and memory

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Human memory consists of three main distinct stores: sensory memory, short-term/working-memory, and long-term memory. In the last decade, there have been extensive studies on working memory in terms of its capacity, encoding (slot versus resource), stages, neural correlates, and how information is stored as a function of stimulus conditions. The goal of this issue is to bring together the most recent work in these related areas to offer a contemporary synthesis of our understanding of these memory stages and their operation in a single issue.

Dr. Haluk Öǧmen
Dr. Srimant Tripathy
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Vision is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sensory memory
  • iconic memory
  • working memory
  • short-term memory

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
The Sternberg Paradigm: Correcting Encoding Latencies in Visual and Auditory Test Designs
Vision 2021, 5(2), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/vision5020021 - 04 May 2021
Viewed by 928
Abstract
The Sternberg task is a widely used tool for assessing the working memory performance in vision and cognitive science. It is possible to apply a visual or auditory variant of the Sternberg task to query the memory load. However, previous studies have shown [...] Read more.
The Sternberg task is a widely used tool for assessing the working memory performance in vision and cognitive science. It is possible to apply a visual or auditory variant of the Sternberg task to query the memory load. However, previous studies have shown that the subjects’ corresponding reaction times differ dependent on the used variant. In this work, we present an experimental approach that is intended to correct the reaction time differences observed between auditory and visual item presentation. We found that the subjects’ reaction time offset is related to the encoding speed of a single probe item. After correcting for these individual encoding latencies, differences in the results of both the auditory and visual Sternberg task become non-significant, p=0.252. Thus, an equal task difficulty can be concluded for both variants of item presentation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensory and Working Memory: Stimulus Encoding, Storage, and Retrieval)
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Article
Effects of Audiovisual Memory Cues on Working Memory Recall
Vision 2021, 5(1), 14; https://doi.org/10.3390/vision5010014 - 19 Mar 2021
Viewed by 909
Abstract
Previous studies have focused on topics such as multimodal integration and object discrimination, but there is limited research on the effect of multimodal learning in memory. Perceptual studies have shown facilitative effects of multimodal stimuli for learning; the current study aims to determine [...] Read more.
Previous studies have focused on topics such as multimodal integration and object discrimination, but there is limited research on the effect of multimodal learning in memory. Perceptual studies have shown facilitative effects of multimodal stimuli for learning; the current study aims to determine whether this effect persists with memory cues. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect that audiovisual memory cues have on memory recall, as well as whether the use of multiple memory cues leads to higher recall. The goal was to orthogonally evaluate the effect of the number of self-generated memory cues (one or three), and the modality of the self-generated memory-cue (visual: written words, auditory: spoken words, or audiovisual). A recall task was administered where participants were presented with their self-generated memory cues and asked to determine the target word. There was a significant main effect for number of cues, but no main effect for modality. A secondary goal of this study was to determine which types of memory cues result in the highest recall. Self-reference cues resulted in the highest accuracy score. This study has applications to improving academic performance by using the most efficient learning techniques. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensory and Working Memory: Stimulus Encoding, Storage, and Retrieval)
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