Special Issue "Antimicrobial Use and Resistance in Animals"

A special issue of Veterinary Sciences (ISSN 2306-7381).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 March 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Marie Archambault
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Université de Montréal, 3200 Rue Sicotte, Saint-Hyacinthe, QC J2S 2M2, Canada
Interests: antimicrobial resistance; virulence; animal pathogens
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Mohamed Rhouma
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Université de Montréal, 3200 Rue Sicotte, Saint-Hyacinthe, QC J2S 2M2, Canada
Interests: antimicrobial use and resistance; dosage regimens; PK/PD models; one health; food safety
Prof. Dr. Patrick Butaye
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine, PO 334, Basseterre, St. Kitts & Nevis, West Indies
2. Department of Pathology, Bacteriology and Avian diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Salisburylaan 133, 9820 Merelbeke, Belgium
Interests: microbiology; antimicrobial resistance in bacteria; molecular epidemiology of bacteria
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) has become a global issue and a threat to both human and animal health as well as to the environment. Over the past decade, considerable efforts have been made in veterinary medicine, especially in farm animals, to limit the spread of AMR bacteria and to preserve the effectiveness of antimicrobials, mainly through the reduction of antimicrobial use (AMU). However, these efforts have been insufficient, mainly because the impact of AMU in animals on the emergence and dissemination of AMR bacteria, and their resistance determinants in both animals and humans, as well as in the environment, is poorly understood. This Special Issue provides an opportunity to exchange research results, expertise and opinions regarding the following topics:

  • Prevalence and molecular characterization of AMR bacteria of animal origin;
  • One-Health perspective of AMR;
  • Relation of AMU in farms on AMR in bacteria of animal origin and along the food chain;
  • The pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics (PK/PD) optimization of antimicrobials in food-producing animals to reduce AMR bacteria selection;
  • New technologies for improving microbial disease diagnosis as well as new alternatives to antimicrobials to reduce AMU in animals;
  • Antimicrobial stewardship;
  • Knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding AMU and AMR among the different stakeholders of animal production.

Prof. Dr. Marie Archambault
Dr. Mohamed Rhouma
Prof. Dr. Patrick Butaye
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Veterinary Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • antimicrobial use
  • antimicrobial resistance
  • food-producing animals
  • One Health
  • pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics optimization
  • microbial disease diagnosis
  • alternatives to antimicrobials
  • food chain
  • education and awareness

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
A Biological Study of Anisotropic Silver Nanoparticles and Their Antimicrobial Application for Topical Use
Vet. Sci. 2021, 8(9), 177; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci8090177 - 31 Aug 2021
Viewed by 1215
Abstract
The excessive use of antibiotics in both human and veterinary medicine has contributed to the development and rapid spread of drug resistance in bacteria. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have become a tool of choice that can be used to treat these resistant bacteria. Several [...] Read more.
The excessive use of antibiotics in both human and veterinary medicine has contributed to the development and rapid spread of drug resistance in bacteria. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have become a tool of choice that can be used to treat these resistant bacteria. Several studies have shown that AgNPs have antibacterial and wound healing properties. In this study, we evaluated the biological activity of anisotropic AgNPs to develop an antimicrobial gel formulation for treating wound infections. We showed that some anisotropic AgNPs (S2) have an effective antibacterial activity against bacterial pathogens and low cytotoxicity to keratinocytes and fibroblasts in vitro. The MIC and MBC values were in the range of 2–32 µg/mL, and cytotoxicity had IC50 values of 68.20 ± 9.71 µg/mL and 68.65 ± 10.97 µg/mL against human keratinocyte and normal human dermal fibroblast cells, respectively. The anisotropic AgNPs (S2) were used as a gel component and tested for antibacterial activity, including long-term protection, compared with povidone iodine, a common antiseptic agent. The results show that the anisotropic AgNPs can inhibit the growth of most tested bacterial pathogens and provide protection longer than 48 h, whereas povidone iodine only inhibits the growth of some bacteria. This study suggests that anisotropic AgNPs could be used as an alternative antimicrobial agent for treating bacterial skin infection and as a wound healing formulation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antimicrobial Use and Resistance in Animals)
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