Special Issue "Occurrence, Fate and Transport of Marine Pollutants"

A special issue of Toxics (ISSN 2305-6304). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2022 | Viewed by 1341

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Yuxin Sun
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Key Laboratory of Tropical Marine Bio-Resources and Ecology, South China Sea Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510301, China
Interests: marine pollutants; marine environmental chemistry; ecological risk assessment

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The pollution of marine environments by human activities has become an increasingly serious issue. A large number of pollutants raise grave concerns for the health of both marine ecosystems and humans, via the consumption of contaminated seafood. It is of great significance to explore the occurrence, fate, bioaccumulation and biomagnification of marine pollutants and to evaluate the ecological risk of pollutants for protecting the marine environment and promoting the sustainable development of the ocean.

In this Special Issue, we aim to focus on various marine pollutants, particularly those that pose a threat to the environment and human health. Relevant research can focus on the occurrence, fate and transport process of marine pollutants, as well as the assessment of environmental effects and ecological risks of pollutants. Authors are welcome to submit original research articles, reviews, viewpoints and short communications.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Yuxin Sun
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Toxics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • marine pollutants
  • marine environmental behavior
  • marine environmental chemistry
  • marine pollution control
  • ecological risk assessment

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Effects of Discarded Masks on the Offshore Microorganisms during the COVID-19 Pandemic
Toxics 2022, 10(8), 426; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics10080426 (registering DOI) - 28 Jul 2022
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Abstract
Numerous disposable plastic masks had been produced and used for preventing the worldwide COVID-19 pandemic effectively. Discarded masks are a potential source of microplastic pollution in marine ecosystems. The effect of discarded masks on offshore microorganisms is still unclear. Herein, we profiled the [...] Read more.
Numerous disposable plastic masks had been produced and used for preventing the worldwide COVID-19 pandemic effectively. Discarded masks are a potential source of microplastic pollution in marine ecosystems. The effect of discarded masks on offshore microorganisms is still unclear. Herein, we profiled the interaction between the microplastics released by discarded masks and marine microbes. The effects of mask quantity, time, and environment on the microplastic-related communities were determined. We characterized the bacterial communities of each group using 16S rRNA gene sequencing and metagenomic sequencing and correlated the community diversity to the physicochemical properties of seawater. We found that the diversity and richness of microflora on the surface of microplastics with different quantity and time varied significantly. Proteobacteria are the main bacteria on microplastics, and the KEGG metabolic pathway prediction shows that amino acid metabolism and carbohydrate metabolism were abundant. In addition, there was a correlation between bacterial communities and Antibiotic Resistance Ontology (ARO). We used scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) techniques to evaluate the plastic polymer characteristics of disposable medical masks. Our research shows that disposable medical masks immersed in seawater can alter the microbial community. This study provides the most recent data and insights into the contamination of discarded masks in the marine environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occurrence, Fate and Transport of Marine Pollutants)
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Article
Heavy Metal Contamination in Sediments from Wetlands Invaded by Spartina alterniflora in the Yellow River Delta
Toxics 2022, 10(7), 374; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics10070374 - 04 Jul 2022
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Abstract
Heavy metals are major pollutants that pose threats to wetland environments. In the present study, surface sediments from wetlands vegetated by invasive species Spartina alterniflora in the Yellow River Delta were collected and determined for the mass fractions of Co, Ni, As, Cd [...] Read more.
Heavy metals are major pollutants that pose threats to wetland environments. In the present study, surface sediments from wetlands vegetated by invasive species Spartina alterniflora in the Yellow River Delta were collected and determined for the mass fractions of Co, Ni, As, Cd and Pb. Results showed mass fractions of Co, Ni, As, Cd and Pb in the sediments of the S. alterniflora communities ranged from 8.5 to 16.0, 13.9–27.9, 3.2–13.8, 0.08–0.24, and 17.6–37.5 mg/kg dw, respectively, generally presenting an order of Pb > Ni > Co > As > Cd. The levels of heavy metals in sediments in the S. alterniflora communities were higher than those in the wetland vegetated by the native plant species Suaeda heteroptera. Correlations among metal elements were highly significant, suggesting that they might have the same sources. Clay and TOC were important factors affecting the spatial distribution of metals. The Igeo values of the investigated elements in the sediments were frequently lower than 0, revealing the slight pollution status of these metals. Relatively slight values of Eri and RI suggested that the potential ecological risks caused by the 5 metals were low. Our findings could provide a better understanding of the correlation between metal pollution and bio-invasion in wetland ecosystems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occurrence, Fate and Transport of Marine Pollutants)
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Communication
Bioaccumulation and Biomagnification of Polychlorinated Biphenyls and Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane in Biota from Qilianyu Island, South China Sea
Toxics 2022, 10(6), 324; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics10060324 - 14 Jun 2022
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Abstract
Six biota species were collected from Qilianyu Island, South China Sea to determine the bioaccumulation and biomagnification of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and its metabolites (DDTs). Concentrations of ΣPCBs and ΣDDTs in biota from Qilianyu Island ranged from 6.88 to 519.1 ng/g [...] Read more.
Six biota species were collected from Qilianyu Island, South China Sea to determine the bioaccumulation and biomagnification of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and its metabolites (DDTs). Concentrations of ΣPCBs and ΣDDTs in biota from Qilianyu Island ranged from 6.88 to 519.1 ng/g lipid weight (lw) and 7.0 to 19,413 ng/g lw, respectively. Significant differences for PCBs and DDTs concentrations were found among the six biota species from Qilianyu Island. The levels of PCBs and DDTs in intermediate egret were significantly higher than the other five biota species, which can be attributed to their different feeding and living habits. Significantly negative relationships between concentrations of PCBs and DDTs and δ13C values in the six biota species confirmed that dietary source is an important factor to determine the levels of PCBs and DDTs in biota species. ΣPCBs, ΣDDTs, PCB 28/31, PCB 52, and p,p′-DDE were biomagnified in the biota species from Qilianyu Island, and native species are suitable for studying the biomagnification of the contaminants. The toxic equivalent concentrations in birds from Qilianyu Island were significantly and positively correlated with PCBs concentrations, indicating that high concentrations of non- and mono-ortho-PCB congeners may induce adverse effects on bird species. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occurrence, Fate and Transport of Marine Pollutants)
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