Hazardous Effects of Emerging Contaminants on Wildlife

A special issue of Toxics (ISSN 2305-6304). This special issue belongs to the section "Ecotoxicology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 3825

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
College of Life Sciences, Hainan Normal University, Haikou 571158, China
Interests: ecotoxicology; aquatic toxicology; developmental toxicity; neurotoxicity; behavior disruption; reproduction toxicity; fish models; organic pollutants; endocrine disrupting chemicals; emerging contaminants; molecular mechanisms of emerging pollutants

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Guest Editor
Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for Ecology of Tropical Islands, Key Laboratory of Tropical Animal and Plant Ecology of Hainan Province, College of Life Sciences, Hainan Normal University, Haikou, China
Interests: physiological ecology; ecotoxicology

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Guest Editor
Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for Ecology of Tropical Islands, Key Laboratory of Tropical Animal and Plant Ecology of Hainan Province, College of Life Sciences, Hainan Normal University, Haikou, China
Interests: he is broadly interested in the ecology and evolution of anuran species; his researches combine field surveys, control experiments and comparative analyses to understand how acoustic signals and calling behaviours evolve and adapt natural noisy environments as well as anthropogenic noise pollution

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Wildlife is vulnerable to suffering harm from pollution. Emerging contaminants (ECs) include microplastics, endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), and personal care products and pharmaceuticals (PCPPs); these constitute a group of existing pollutants with negative impacts on wildlife populations and which lead to the decline of many species, both directly and indirectly. Ecotoxicological research is crucial to supporting the science-based risk assessment and management of anthropogenic ECs in the wild. This Special Issue of Toxics, entitled “Hazardous Effects of Emerging Contaminants on Wildlife,” will aim to highlight the latest advances in EC-related wildlife ecotoxicology, investigating toxicological effects and mechanisms, and reporting the results of biomonitoring and modeling studies that assess ecological risks. Authors are invited to submit original research papers, reviews, and short communications.

Suggested research areas may include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • Laboratory and field studies related to chemical-related toxic effects and the mechanism involved.
  • Hazardous effects of light and noise pollution on wildlife.
  • Bioaccumulation studies of emerging contaminants in wildlife.
  • New methods for assessing toxicity in wildlife.

Dr. Jiliang Zhang
Prof. Dr. Meiling Hong
Dr. Longhui Zhao
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Toxics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • wildlife
  • emerging contaminants
  • ecotoxicology
  • light pollution
  • noise pollution

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

10 pages, 2228 KiB  
Article
Microplastic Distribution Characteristics and Sources on Beaches That Serve as the Largest Nesting Ground for Green Turtles in China
by Ting Zhang, Deqin Li, Yunteng Liu, Yupei Li, Yangfei Yu, Xiaoyu An, Yongkang Jiang, Jichao Wang, Haitao Shi and Liu Lin
Toxics 2024, 12(2), 109; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics12020109 - 28 Jan 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1301
Abstract
The threat of microplastics to marine animals and habitats is increasing, which may affect sea turtle nesting grounds. The Qilianyu Islands are the largest remaining green turtle (Chelonia mydas) nesting grounds in China. Despite being far from the mainland, microplastic pollution [...] Read more.
The threat of microplastics to marine animals and habitats is increasing, which may affect sea turtle nesting grounds. The Qilianyu Islands are the largest remaining green turtle (Chelonia mydas) nesting grounds in China. Despite being far from the mainland, microplastic pollution cannot be ignored. In this study, the level of microplastic pollution in surface sediments from three different zones, namely, the bottom, intertidal, and supratidal zone, was investigated on North Island, Qilianyu Islands. The results showed that the abundance of microplastics in the supratidal zone was significantly higher than that in the bottom zone and intertidal zone (r = 3.65, p = 0.011), with the highest average abundance of microplastics located on the southwest coast of North Island. In the bottom zone, only plastic blocks (88%) and fibers (12%) were found. The main types of microplastics in the intertidal and supratidal zones were plastic blocks (48%) and foam (42%), with polyethylene (PE) (40%) and polystyrene (PS) (34%) being the predominant components. These types and components of microplastics differed from those in the surrounding seawater, but corresponding types and components were found in the plastic debris on the beach. Meanwhile, it was also observed that there were multiple instances of fragmented plastic on the beach. Thus, we suggest that the microplastics on the beach in North Island were mainly derived from the fragmentation of microplastic debris, indicating secondary microplastics. It is recommended to further strengthen the regular cleaning of plastic debris on the beach, especially the removal of small plastic debris, in order to reduce the pollution from secondary microplastics generated by the fragmentation of beach plastic debris and to better protect China’s most important sea turtle nesting site in the South China Sea. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hazardous Effects of Emerging Contaminants on Wildlife)
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15 pages, 2757 KiB  
Article
Triphenyltin Influenced Carotenoid-Based Coloration in Coral Reef Fish, Amphiprion ocellaris, by Disrupting Carotenoid Metabolism
by Yan Zhang, Xingwei Cai, Yu Hou, Wenming Chen and Jiliang Zhang
Toxics 2024, 12(1), 13; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics12010013 - 22 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1060
Abstract
Triphenyltin (TPT), a kind of persistent pollutant, is prevalent in the aquatic environment and could pose a threat to coral reef fish. However, little is known about the toxicity of TPT on coral reef fish, especially regarding the representative characteristics of body coloration. [...] Read more.
Triphenyltin (TPT), a kind of persistent pollutant, is prevalent in the aquatic environment and could pose a threat to coral reef fish. However, little is known about the toxicity of TPT on coral reef fish, especially regarding the representative characteristics of body coloration. Therefore, this study chose the clownfish (Amphiprion ocellaris) in order to investigate the effects of TPT exposure on its carotenoid-based body coloration under the environmentally relevant concentrations (0, 1, 10 and 100 ng/L). After TPT exposure for 60 d, the carotenoid contents were decreased and histological damage in the liver was found, shown as nuclear pyknosis and shift, lipid deposition and fibrotic tissue hyperplasia. Liver transcriptomic analysis showed that TPT exposure interfered with oxidative phosphorylation and fatty acid metabolism pathways, which related to carotenoids uptake and metabolism. Furthermore, TPT exposure led to oxidative damage in the liver, which is responsible for the changes in the antioxidant capacity of enzymes, including GSH, MDA, POD, CAT and T-SOD. TPT exposure also affected the genes (Scarb1, CD36, Stard3 and Stard5) related to carotenoid absorption and transport, as well as the genes (GstP1 and Bco2) related to carotenoid deposition and decomposition. Taken together, our results demonstrate that TPT influenced carotenoid-based coloration in coral reef fish by disrupting carotenoid metabolism, which complements the ecotoxicological effects and toxic mechanisms of TPT and provides data for the body color biology of coral reef fishes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hazardous Effects of Emerging Contaminants on Wildlife)
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12 pages, 3313 KiB  
Article
Effect of Butyl Paraben on Oxidative Stress in the Liver of Mauremys sinensis
by Yaru Yin, Zhenzi Xie, Xiao Sun, Xia Wu, Jiliang Zhang, Haitao Shi, Li Ding and Meiling Hong
Toxics 2023, 11(11), 915; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics11110915 - 9 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1112
Abstract
Butyl paraben (BuP) has been widely used as a preservative in the cosmetics, food, and medicine industries. Recently, it has become a new pollutant and has attracted much attention. In order to evaluate the toxic effect of BuP on aquatic animals, Chinese striped-neck [...] Read more.
Butyl paraben (BuP) has been widely used as a preservative in the cosmetics, food, and medicine industries. Recently, it has become a new pollutant and has attracted much attention. In order to evaluate the toxic effect of BuP on aquatic animals, Chinese striped-neck turtles (Mauremys sinensis) were exposed to BuP solutions with different concentrations of 0, 5, 50, 500, and 5000 µg/L for 20 weeks. The results showed that with an increase in BuP concentration, the activity of antioxidant enzymes (SOD, CAT and GSH-PX) in liver decreased. The expression of key genes in the Nrf2-Keap1 signal pathways first increased and then decreased, while the expression of the HSP70 and HSP90 genes increased. In addition, the liver had an inflammatory reaction. The expression of the BAFF and IL-6 genes increased and then decreased with an increase in BuP concentration, while the expression of P50 and P65 increased significantly. Oxidative stress induced apoptosis, and the expression of pro-apoptosis genes (BAX, cytc, Caspase3 and Caspase9) increased, while the expression of the anti-apoptosis gene Bcl2 decreased. The results provide an important reference for the comprehensive ecological and health risk assessment of environmental BuP. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hazardous Effects of Emerging Contaminants on Wildlife)
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