Managing Tourism and Recreation in Parks and Protected Areas

A special issue of Tourism and Hospitality (ISSN 2673-5768).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 December 2023) | Viewed by 1562

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
1. School of Physical Education, Jiaying University, Meizhou 514015, China
2. Department of Healthcare Industry Technology Development and Management, National Chin-Yi University of Technology, Taichung 41170, Taiwan
Interests: green tourism; cultural and art tourism; smart tourism; tourism risk; tourism economics; stakeholders; consumer behavior and intention; mixed research; interdisciplinary research
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

National parks are treasures of nature. They boast a wide variety of natural ecological resources and have rich topographic and climatic characteristics. They provide tens of thousands of species with sufficient food sources and diverse living environments, and offer local people access to abundant resources and incomes.

However, since December 2019, the COVID-19 pandemic has played havoc with the global travel industry. As some studies have pointed out, this has given the natural environment a needed period of respite. However, due to the rapid mutation rate of the virus and its highly infectious nature, the tourism industry is still unable to completely resume operation. Although vaccines are in circulation and development, and the rate of the pandemic has eased slightly, the situation is not resolved. This problem has damaged the economy of countries and villages whose main economic income is rooted in tourism, causing great detriment to many people. This problem is relevant in national parks and surrounding villages around the world. Therefore, we want to use this Special Issue to investigate the current state of the tourism industry in relation to national parks in the hardest-hit areas and countries that are in the gradual process of recovery, in an attempt to understand the plight of local organizations and villages and find a solution.

Of course, although we aim to discuss the development of the tourism industry in relation to national scenic spots in the post-pandemic period, this Special Issue is not limited directly to this topic. We will consider issues relating to national parks, tourism, ecotourism, pollution, and rural tourism. We welcome qualitative or quantitative studies, and articles that use applied statistical analysis may also be considered. Original articles and review articles are welcome.

Dr. Hsiao-Hsien Lin
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Tourism and Hospitality is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • national park tourism development as a subject of study
  • countryside tour
  • tourism industry
  • hotel and homestay industry
  • ecosystem
  • tourism innovation
  • regional and tourism business transformation
  • environmental sustainability
  • tourism sustainability

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

17 pages, 1701 KiB  
Article
Codes of Conduct at Zoos: A Case Study of the Chengdu Research Base of Giant Panda Breeding
by David Fennell and Yulei Guo
Tour. Hosp. 2024, 5(1), 95-111; https://doi.org/10.3390/tourhosp5010007 - 5 Feb 2024
Viewed by 937
Abstract
Zoos consistently implement codes of conduct in efforts to manage visitor behaviour. However, few studies have examined the use of the codes of conduct in zoos, even though they carry significant ethical implications regarding the relationship between humans and animals in society. This [...] Read more.
Zoos consistently implement codes of conduct in efforts to manage visitor behaviour. However, few studies have examined the use of the codes of conduct in zoos, even though they carry significant ethical implications regarding the relationship between humans and animals in society. This study provides an explorative investigation into the use of codes of conduct at the Chengdu Research Base of Giant Panda Breeding (Panda Base). Positioning the Panda Base as a place to negotiate the boundaries between humans and animals, this study surveyed visitors’ initial engagement with the Base’s code of conduct, their compliance with the code, and their assessment of the code. The findings point to a significant disparity between how visitors engage with and perceive the value of the code, which failed to prevent visitors from having close contact with animals at the Panda Base. We argue that Foucault’s philosophy on taboos in modern society can help us understand the ineffectiveness of the codes of conduct in zoos. However, Kant’s philosophy can orient human-animal interactions more ethically and provide an opportunity to consider the significance of codes of conduct in zoos. Suggestions for improving the effectiveness of codes of conduct at zoos are provided. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Managing Tourism and Recreation in Parks and Protected Areas)
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