Special Issue "Municipal Solid Waste Management in a Circular Economy"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Isabella Pecorini
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Energy, Systems, Territory and Constructions Engineering (Destec), University of Pisa, 56122 Pisa, Italy
Interests: Municipal Solid Waste; Environmental Impact Assessment; Solid Waste Management; Anaerobic Digestion; Recycling; Waste Treatment; Hazardous Waste Management; Waste Utilization; Bioenergy; Methane Production; Food Waste; Municipal Solid Waste Treatment; Biogas Purification; Landfill Gas; biofiltration

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The transition from a linear economy to a circular economy is currently one of the biggest challenges in the field of municipal solid waste management.

In this Special Issue, the management of municipal solid waste is studied from the perspective of the circular economy in order " to close the loop" and minimise greenhouse gases. A central issue concerns the study of safety and quality requirements for recycled materials and “end of waste” criteria. Papers of both fundamental research and applied research related to problems of interest to researchers, professionals and public officials involved in the management of municipal solid waste will be taken into consideration.

The main issues of interest from the point of view of the circular economy for this Special Issue on Municipal Solid Waste Management concern:

- Generation, Minimization and Characterization,

- Recycling, reuse and forms of material and energy recovery,

- Storage, collection, transport and transfer,

- Treatment (mechanical, biological, chemical, thermal, other),

- Landfill disposal and potential for enhanced landfill mining,

- Environmental assessments and planning,

- Economic analysis, policies and regulations,

- Decision tool and risk assessment analysis.

Dr. Isabella Pecorini
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Municipal Solid Waste
  • Circular Economy
  • Waste Treatment
  • Landfill
  • Anaerobic digestion
  • Biogas
  • Composting
  • Thermal Treatment
  • Life cycle analysis
  • MBT technology
  • Waste valorization
  • Greenhouse gas emission

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Bromatological, Proximate and Ultimate Analysis of OFMSW for Different Seasons and Collection Systems
Sustainability 2020, 12(7), 2639; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12072639 - 26 Mar 2020
Abstract
In order to study the quality of organic fractions of municipal solid waste (OFMSW), five different municipalities in Tuscany were chosen for sampling according to the peculiarities of their collection systems. The five collection systems selected were sampled four times: during March, June, [...] Read more.
In order to study the quality of organic fractions of municipal solid waste (OFMSW), five different municipalities in Tuscany were chosen for sampling according to the peculiarities of their collection systems. The five collection systems selected were sampled four times: during March, June, September and December, for a total of 20 picking analyses. In addition, emphasis was also given to the study of the variability of OFMSW composition related to ultimate, proximate and bromatological analyses. Road container collection systems proved to have a higher content of non-compostable and undesirable fractions (22%±1%) when compared to door-to-door systems (6% ± 1%). During months with lower temperature (March and December), the garden waste content in the OFMSW was negligible, with kitchen waste prevailing. This altered the physical chemical composition of OFMSW, which had a lower lignin content and higher methane production in the months with lower temperatures (272 ± 23 NLCH4 kgTVS−1) compared to June and September (238 ± 14 NLCH4 kgTVS−1). In general, the Tuscan OFMSW had a higher dry matter content (42%) than observed in previous studies. In conclusion, the result could direct possible future operators of anaerobic digestion plants towards the choice of dry and semi-dry technologies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Municipal Solid Waste Management in a Circular Economy)
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Open AccessArticle
Characterization of Excavated Waste of Different Ages in View of Multiple Resource Recovery in Landfill Mining
Sustainability 2020, 12(5), 1780; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12051780 - 27 Feb 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
With the aim of examining the forcing factors in postmanagement landfills, in this study, excavation waste from nonhazardous municipal waste landfill in Tuscany was characterized for the first time. The specific objective was to estimate the feasibility of sampling and analyzing the excavated [...] Read more.
With the aim of examining the forcing factors in postmanagement landfills, in this study, excavation waste from nonhazardous municipal waste landfill in Tuscany was characterized for the first time. The specific objective was to estimate the feasibility of sampling and analyzing the excavated waste in order to define its properties and provide information about possible landfill mining projects. Based on the biochemical methane potential assays, it was shown that the excavated waste had not yet been stabilized (i.e., with a production of 52.2 ± 28.7 NlCH4/kgTS) in the landfill, probably due to the low excavated waste moisture content (36% ± 6% w/w). Furthermore, excavated waste has a high calorific value, i.e., 15.2 ± 4.1 MJ/kg; the quantity of combustibles in the industrial shredder waste (16 MJ/kg) was rather modest compared to that of municipal solid waste (20.8 MJ/Kg). In conclusion, during large scale excavation of the landfill, it was possible to evaluate how a dedicated treatment plant could be designed to treat and select waste which might appear in a different category. For excavated industrial waste, detailed mechanical sorting may be convenient for end-of-waste recovery to improve calorific value. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Municipal Solid Waste Management in a Circular Economy)
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