sustainability-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Municipal Solid Waste Management in a Circular Economy"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Resources and Sustainable Utilization".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2021) | Viewed by 17533

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Isabella Pecorini
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Energy, Systems, Territory and Constructions Engineering (Destec), University of Pisa, 56122 Pisa, Italy
Interests: Municipal Solid Waste; Environmental Impact Assessment; Solid Waste Management; Anaerobic Digestion; Recycling; Waste Treatment; Hazardous Waste Management; Waste Utilization; Bioenergy; Methane Production; Food Waste; Municipal Solid Waste Treatment; Biogas Purification; Landfill Gas; biofiltration
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The transition from a linear economy to a circular economy is currently one of the biggest challenges in the field of municipal solid waste management.

In this Special Issue, the management of municipal solid waste is studied from the perspective of the circular economy in order " to close the loop" and minimise greenhouse gases. A central issue concerns the study of safety and quality requirements for recycled materials and “end of waste” criteria. Papers of both fundamental research and applied research related to problems of interest to researchers, professionals and public officials involved in the management of municipal solid waste will be taken into consideration.

The main issues of interest from the point of view of the circular economy for this Special Issue on Municipal Solid Waste Management concern:

- Generation, Minimization and Characterization,

- Recycling, reuse and forms of material and energy recovery,

- Storage, collection, transport and transfer,

- Treatment (mechanical, biological, chemical, thermal, other),

- Landfill disposal and potential for enhanced landfill mining,

- Environmental assessments and planning,

- Economic analysis, policies and regulations,

- Decision tool and risk assessment analysis.

Dr. Isabella Pecorini
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Municipal Solid Waste
  • Circular Economy
  • Waste Treatment
  • Landfill
  • Anaerobic digestion
  • Biogas
  • Composting
  • Thermal Treatment
  • Life cycle analysis
  • MBT technology
  • Waste valorization
  • Greenhouse gas emission

Published Papers (15 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
The Impact of COVID-19 on Solid Waste Generation in the Perspectives of Socioeconomic and People’s Behavior: A Case Study in Serdang, Malaysia
Sustainability 2021, 13(23), 13045; https://doi.org/10.3390/su132313045 - 25 Nov 2021
Viewed by 552
Abstract
Malaysia has enforced several phases of Movement Control Order (MCO) as a quarantine period since 18 March 2020 with the intended purpose of containing the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak. The quarantine has affected people’s daily lives with frequent job dismissal and retrenchment due [...] Read more.
Malaysia has enforced several phases of Movement Control Order (MCO) as a quarantine period since 18 March 2020 with the intended purpose of containing the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak. The quarantine has affected people’s daily lives with frequent job dismissal and retrenchment due to the struggling economic conditions of particularly small and medium businesses. This study aimed to understand the impact of MCO on solid waste management in Serdang, Selangor from the aspects of socioeconomic and people’s behavior. Solid waste generation data in Serdang, Selangor was collected by KDEB Waste Management through waste weighing daily throughout 2019 and 2020. The collection was conducted according to different housing areas of Serdang. The quantitative findings have recorded a decline of 9.94% in solid waste data generation subjected to COVID-19 lockdown. In conjunction with that, an online questionnaire participated by 310 respondents was conducted on understanding the effect of the lockdown on people’s behavior and socioeconomic aspect with respect to solid waste management. This study revealed that June onwards (after MCO Phase 1) generated the most solid waste. Indeed, solid waste generation due to MCO according to the waste refusal behavior is the consensus in favor of Malaysia’s appropriate need for stricter policies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Municipal Solid Waste Management in a Circular Economy)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Management Strategies and Stakeholders Analysis to Strengthen the Management and Use of Biosolids in a Colombian Municipality
Sustainability 2021, 13(21), 12180; https://doi.org/10.3390/su132112180 - 04 Nov 2021
Viewed by 547
Abstract
The difficulties in the management and use of biosolids in Colombia make it necessary to evaluate and analyze the factors involved through various methodologies to achieve the effective management and recycling of this type of waste. The objective of this study was to [...] Read more.
The difficulties in the management and use of biosolids in Colombia make it necessary to evaluate and analyze the factors involved through various methodologies to achieve the effective management and recycling of this type of waste. The objective of this study was to evaluate the management of sludge and biosolids from a WWTP in a Colombian municipality through the application of three methodologies (SWOT/TOWS, surveys, and stakeholder (player) weighing) for their subsequent use in agriculture. As a result, strategies were proposed at the regulatory, organizational policy, and entity integration levels, among others. It was identified that about 93.6% of the people surveyed had a positive attitude towards the use of biosolids in agriculture, despite recognizing the existence of a risk (27.3%) in this type of practice. On the other hand, regarding the communication of WWTP management of these wastes, they perceived that it to be absent (65%) and the lack of knowledge regarding the destination of these wastes was even greater (72.7%). Through the weighting of actors, 16 players were classified with whom it is necessary to work closely, regularly, or occasionally. The methodologies proposed will allow similar WWTPs to optimize their processes through continuous improvement and joint work between the different entities and communities. It is recommended that other methodologies be used to evaluate player position level in relation to planned strategies, as well as the level of associations of one player with another, independent of power and influence. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Municipal Solid Waste Management in a Circular Economy)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Promotion of Household Waste Utilization in China: Lessons Learnt from Three Case Studies
Sustainability 2021, 13(21), 11598; https://doi.org/10.3390/su132111598 - 20 Oct 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 605
Abstract
Household waste utilization has been regarded as an important pathway to promote the circular economy paradigm and sustainable development for a long time. However, relevant enterprises are facing dilemmas in terms of the backward disposal methods for food waste, inadequate recycling of low-value [...] Read more.
Household waste utilization has been regarded as an important pathway to promote the circular economy paradigm and sustainable development for a long time. However, relevant enterprises are facing dilemmas in terms of the backward disposal methods for food waste, inadequate recycling of low-value recyclable waste and the lack of leading enterprises, resulting in unsustainable expansion of the industry. To address these problems, we investigated governmental departments and 20 household waste utilization enterprises in China. From the investigation, three typical enterprises, representing the advanced technology for food waste, the recycling mode of recyclable waste and the cultivation mode of leading enterprises, were selected for case studies. The results indicate that applying the technology of bioconversion by maggots could improve the utilization of food waste and adopting the “online and offline” dual-channel mode could benefit the recycling of low-value recyclable waste. Additionally, leading enterprises can be cultivated by franchise mode, which can drive the utilization of household waste in China effectively. The findings enrich the theory of household waste utilization in terms of disposal methods, recycling modes and enterprise operation. Practically, this research should enlighten decision-makers to improve household waste utilization. Furthermore, the research results could be generalized in other countries, thereby advancing the household waste management worldwide. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Municipal Solid Waste Management in a Circular Economy)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Scenarios of Bioenergy Recovery from Organic Fraction of Residual Municipal Waste in the Marche Region (Italy)
Sustainability 2021, 13(20), 11462; https://doi.org/10.3390/su132011462 - 17 Oct 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 791
Abstract
In the Marche Region (Central Italy), the residual municipal waste (RMW) is commonly processed in mechanical biological treatment (MBT) systems. In these systems, following a first mechanical selection, the undersize organic fraction from RMW (us-OFRMW) undergoes a partial aerobic biological treatment before being [...] Read more.
In the Marche Region (Central Italy), the residual municipal waste (RMW) is commonly processed in mechanical biological treatment (MBT) systems. In these systems, following a first mechanical selection, the undersize organic fraction from RMW (us-OFRMW) undergoes a partial aerobic biological treatment before being landfilled as a biostabilised fraction (bios-OFRMW) without dedicated energy or material recovery. Alternative us-OFRMW management scenarios have been elaborated for this region, at both present (reference year 2019) and future (reference year 2035) time bases. In the first scenario, the potential bioenergy recovery through anaerobic digestion (AD) from the us-OFRMW was evaluated. The second scenario aimed at evaluating the residual methane generation expected from the bios-OFRMW once landfilled, thus contributing also to the potential environmental impact connected with landfill gas (LFG) diffuse emissions from the regional landfills. The diversion to AD, at the present time, would allow a potential bioenergy recovery from the us-OFRMW equal to 4.35 MWel, while the alternative scenario involves greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions equal to 195 kg CO2 eq. per ton of deposited bios-OFRMW. In the future, the decreased amount of the us-OFRMW addressed to AD would still contribute with a potential bioenergy recovery of 3.47 MWel. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Municipal Solid Waste Management in a Circular Economy)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Recycling Behaviour of Italian Citizens in Connection with the Clarity of On-Pack Labels. A Bottom-Up Survey
Sustainability 2021, 13(19), 10846; https://doi.org/10.3390/su131910846 - 29 Sep 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 560
Abstract
The present work studies, through an online survey, the recycling behaviours of a representative sample of Italian end users, in connection with the effectiveness of on-pack recycling indications of different packed materials. The study has a special focus on the clarity of on-pack [...] Read more.
The present work studies, through an online survey, the recycling behaviours of a representative sample of Italian end users, in connection with the effectiveness of on-pack recycling indications of different packed materials. The study has a special focus on the clarity of on-pack recycling indications to convey waste sorting information, and the impact of clear and straightforward labelling to improve the sorting result. The work took advantage of social media as the distribution platform, thus obtaining a relatively high involvement of citizens. To investigate the representativeness of the sample, some of its characteristics were subject to checks and comparisons to their corresponding values of the Italian population. According to almost three-quarters of the responders, a clear and straightforward labelling will improve the result of their waste sorting drastically. The general awareness of the answerers relative to the importance of waste recycling and willingness to improve the quality of their sorted waste is very high among the participants but the overall satisfaction of the on-pack indications is relatively low. The score of on-pack labels in conveying information on recycling and waste segregation is evaluated as improvable. A higher perception of circular economy concept leads to more re-utilisation of the packaging parts, which increases with the awareness about the importance of recycling. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Municipal Solid Waste Management in a Circular Economy)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Pretreatment of Automotive Shredder Residues, Their Chemical Characterisation, and Pyrolysis Kinetics
Sustainability 2021, 13(19), 10549; https://doi.org/10.3390/su131910549 - 23 Sep 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 655
Abstract
Automotive Shredder Residue (ASR), a waste when metals are mostly removed from end-of-life vehicles, has constituents similar to municipal solid waste (MSW) consisting of plastics, rubber, textiles, and some metals. The processing of ASR is a challenge due to its heterogeneous nature, making [...] Read more.
Automotive Shredder Residue (ASR), a waste when metals are mostly removed from end-of-life vehicles, has constituents similar to municipal solid waste (MSW) consisting of plastics, rubber, textiles, and some metals. The processing of ASR is a challenge due to its heterogeneous nature, making feeding to a reactor difficult. In this work, a new procedure of ASR pretreatment is proposed to bring particulate nature in the sample for easier feeding during pyrolysis. The thermal breakdown characteristics of the pretreated ASR solids under slow pyrolysis conditions were assessed in a thermogravimetric analyser following the International Confederation for Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry (ICTAC) kinetics committee recommendations. The effect of particle sizes and heating rates were studied at temperatures up to 800 °C at different heating rates of 2, 5, and 10 °C/min for three particle sizes, 38–63 µm, 63–90 µm, and 90–106 µm, and the kinetic data were derived. The volatiles emitted during pyrolysis were characterized by Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Spectroscopy (DRIFTS). We also developed an algorithm for the selection of heating rate during the pyrolysis of the pretreated ASR. The DRIFTS results, kinetic data, and heating rate for the selected particle sizes are useful for the development of a pyrolysis process for pretreated ASR. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Municipal Solid Waste Management in a Circular Economy)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Municipal Solid Waste Management Practices and Challenges in the Southeastern Coastal Cities of Sri Lanka
Sustainability 2021, 13(8), 4556; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13084556 - 20 Apr 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1436
Abstract
Municipal solid waste management (MSWM) has become a major challenge in Sri Lanka for post-conflict development activities. Many urban areas are facing severe problems in managing 10 to 50 metric tons of waste per day. However, limited research has been carried out to [...] Read more.
Municipal solid waste management (MSWM) has become a major challenge in Sri Lanka for post-conflict development activities. Many urban areas are facing severe problems in managing 10 to 50 metric tons of waste per day. However, limited research has been carried out to identify the key issues and policy gaps in MSWM. This research studies the existing complexities of MSWM processes, practices, and emerging challenges in three highly congested urban areas in the south-eastern coast of Sri Lanka. A mixed method strategy using field observations, semi-structured interviews and secondary data sources was employed for the data collection. The study revealed that, although the MSWM systems in the urban areas include all necessary elements, their effectiveness and efficiency are not satisfactory due to poor or non-segregation of waste at the source of generation; lack of resources; absence of regulation to reduce waste generation and control polluters; absence of regular collection schedule; and lack of technical know-how and initiatives. The recommendations drawn from the study include feasible solutions and immediate measures required to improve the MSWM before the related environmental and public health problems become a social catastrophe. The recommendations will also greatly contribute in the achievement of developing sustainable cities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Municipal Solid Waste Management in a Circular Economy)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Evaluation of Mechanical Characteristics of Cement Mortar with Fine Recycled Concrete Aggregates (FRCA)
Sustainability 2021, 13(1), 414; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13010414 - 05 Jan 2021
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 1143
Abstract
One of the growing demands in concrete manufacture is the availability of natural fine aggregates, which account for 35% to 45% of the total concrete. An alternative method of disposal of fine recycled concrete aggregates (FRCA) generated from demolition and construction waste (C&DW) [...] Read more.
One of the growing demands in concrete manufacture is the availability of natural fine aggregates, which account for 35% to 45% of the total concrete. An alternative method of disposal of fine recycled concrete aggregates (FRCA) generated from demolition and construction waste (C&DW) is their usage in mortar and the development of recycled mortar. The main aim of this research work is to evaluate the viability of incorporating FRCA from urban C&DW for the manufacture of cement-based mortars. Simple processing techniques like washing and sieving are adopted to improve the FRCA quality. Physical and chemical characterization of ingredients is carried out. In total four mixes of 1:3 (cement: sand) mortar with partial replacement of normalized sand with FRCA (0%, 25%, 50%, and 100%) are evaluated for mechanical properties. Water to cement ratio for all four mortar mixes are determined by fixed consistency. Mechanical and physical properties like density, compressive strength, and flexural strength are studied for various curing periods, and the result is that the optimum usage of FRCA is 25% based on a 90-day curing period. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Municipal Solid Waste Management in a Circular Economy)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
The Integration of Recycling Cooperatives in the Formal Management of Municipal Solid Waste as a Strategy for the Circular Economy—The Case of Londrina, Brazil
Sustainability 2020, 12(24), 10513; https://doi.org/10.3390/su122410513 - 15 Dec 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1046
Abstract
In many developing countries, the informal recycling sector is responsible for reducing the amount of waste in landfills and supplying the needs of recycling industries. In the context of municipal solid waste (MSW) management, considering that developing countries aim to implement circular economy [...] Read more.
In many developing countries, the informal recycling sector is responsible for reducing the amount of waste in landfills and supplying the needs of recycling industries. In the context of municipal solid waste (MSW) management, considering that developing countries aim to implement circular economy (CE) actions, it is essential to ensure the inclusion of waste pickers (catadores) in an adapted CE structure. This study analyzes the integration of recycling cooperatives in the formal management of municipal solid waste with recyclable potential (MSWRP) of a medium-sized municipality in Brazil, with the objective of ascertaining the contributions of cooperatives in an adapted CE structure and, at the same time, identifying a cooperative that can be used as a benchmarking option for other cooperatives, especially in relation to their organizational and operational practices. The results indicate that from this integration, cooperatives have legal responsibility in the management of MSWRP, resulting in the professionalization of its members and increasing their productivity. The results also revealed that the implementation of the CE in developing countries is, in a sense, conditioned to the performance of the informal sector in the recycling chain and, in addition, that the inclusion of cooperatives in the formal sector of MSWRP management can improve the rates of a municipality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Municipal Solid Waste Management in a Circular Economy)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Statistical Approach for Assessing the Suitability of Substrates for a Biogas Plant
Sustainability 2020, 12(21), 9044; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12219044 - 30 Oct 2020
Viewed by 704
Abstract
In this paper, we focused on the statistical evaluation of inputs to a biogas plant processing a mixture of kitchen waste and agricultural crops to ensure stable biogas production. The aim of the research was to identify the components of the input substrates [...] Read more.
In this paper, we focused on the statistical evaluation of inputs to a biogas plant processing a mixture of kitchen waste and agricultural crops to ensure stable biogas production. The aim of the research was to identify the components of the input substrates that will ensure the maximum yield of CH4 and the substrates that increase the production of H2S. By a suitable combination of substrates, it is possible to optimize the production of biogas from the biogas plant. We analyzed a sample of 858 measurements, which were carried out in a selected biogas station for a period of 2.5 years. We were interested in differences in production of CH4, O2, and H2S outputs depending on the composition of inputs. From 17 inputs, 125 substrates were formed. The significance of the influence of individual substrates as categorical variables with the achieved numerical values was assessed by means of ANOVA analysis. Selected substrates were sorted based on CH4 and H2S production using graphical methods (bubble graphs) into four quadrants defining the desired and undesired values of the output variables. We identified a total of 20 suitable and 11 unsuitable substrates to produce quality biogas. Sorghum silage substrate was defined as a substrate that significantly increases the proportion of H2S in biogas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Municipal Solid Waste Management in a Circular Economy)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Pathways to Urban Sustainability: An Investigation of the Economic Potential of Untreated Household Solid Waste (HSW) in the City of São Paulo
Sustainability 2020, 12(13), 5249; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12135249 - 28 Jun 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1206
Abstract
The depletion of natural resources, the useful life of landfill sites, and the amount of garbage accumulating all challenge public policy to manage urban solid waste. We identified the economic potential for unused solid waste (HSW) in São Paulo in 2018 to be [...] Read more.
The depletion of natural resources, the useful life of landfill sites, and the amount of garbage accumulating all challenge public policy to manage urban solid waste. We identified the economic potential for unused solid waste (HSW) in São Paulo in 2018 to be USD 637,633,836.04 through descriptive quantitative research and documentary analysis in the collected data. This amount comes from five sources, with the majority coming from internalizing private cost credits (45.58%), followed by recycling (42.21%), carbon credits (5.46%), refuse-derived fuel (3.77%), and organic compounds (2.98%). This potential assumes the implantation of waste sorting plants that generate jobs, reduce public expenses, and provide environmental benefits such as forest protection, water, and minerals. The environmentally adequate final destination of HSW constitutes an economic and socio-environmental measure that enables the reverse logistics of the business sector and urban sustainability. Consequently, the economic potential of HSW, generated from its sorting and marketing, could provide a positive contribution with the mitigation of environmental impacts, in addition to income generation and social inclusion. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Municipal Solid Waste Management in a Circular Economy)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Mitigation of Methane, NMVOCs and Odor Emissions in Active and Passive Biofiltration Systems at Municipal Solid Waste Landfills
Sustainability 2020, 12(8), 3203; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12083203 - 15 Apr 2020
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 1386
Abstract
Biofiltration systems are emerging technological solutions for the removal of methane and odors from landfill gas when flaring is no longer feasible. This work analyzed and compared two full-scale biofiltration systems: biofilter and biowindows. The emission mitigation of methane, non-methane volatile organic compounds [...] Read more.
Biofiltration systems are emerging technological solutions for the removal of methane and odors from landfill gas when flaring is no longer feasible. This work analyzed and compared two full-scale biofiltration systems: biofilter and biowindows. The emission mitigation of methane, non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) and odors during a two-year management and monitoring period was studied. In addition to diluted methane, more than 50 NMVOCs have been detected in the inlet raw landfill gas and the sulfur compounds resulted in the highest odor activity value. Both systems, biofilter and biowindows, were effective for the oxidation of methane (58.1% and 88.05%, respectively), for the mitigation of NMVOCs (higher than 80%) and odor reduction (99.84% and 93.82% respectively). As for the biofilter monitoring, it was possible to define the oxidation efficiency trend and in fact to guarantee that for an oxidation efficiency of 80%, the methane load must be less than 6.5 g CH4/m2h with an oxidation rate of 5.2 g CH4/m2h. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Municipal Solid Waste Management in a Circular Economy)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Evaluation of MSW Compost and Digestate Mixtures for a Circular Economy Application
Sustainability 2020, 12(7), 3042; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12073042 - 10 Apr 2020
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 1694
Abstract
In order to obtain a product with agronomic characteristics and biological stability consistent with the EU fertilizer decree for the market of EU fertilising products three different mixtures obtained from sludge digestate from municipal wastewater treatment plant, fresh compost and mature compost have [...] Read more.
In order to obtain a product with agronomic characteristics and biological stability consistent with the EU fertilizer decree for the market of EU fertilising products three different mixtures obtained from sludge digestate from municipal wastewater treatment plant, fresh compost and mature compost have been studied and characterized. For the experimental activity, the raw samples and three mixing ones were collected for the analytical characterization. The biological stability was then assessed for all samples using different stability criteria such as Specific Oxygen Uptake Rate, Rottegrad self-heating factor, Residual biogas potential. Specific enzymatic tests provided information about the status of nutrient cycles (C, P and S) and to overall microbial activity. Physical (bulk density, particle density, air capacity and water content), nutritional (C, N, P, K, Mg, and Ca) and toxicological properties (seedling growth tests on Lepidum sativum L., Cucumis sativus L., Lolium perenne L.) were also evaluated in order to assess the feasibility of agronomic use of the digestate-based mixtures. All the digestate-based mixtures responded to the main characteristics of compost quality requirements proposed in national and international regulations. The evidence found in this study highlighted that the strategy of mixing of sludge digestates with the composts allowed to mitigate the environmental risk posed by each starting material and to valorize their nutrient content. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Municipal Solid Waste Management in a Circular Economy)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Bromatological, Proximate and Ultimate Analysis of OFMSW for Different Seasons and Collection Systems
Sustainability 2020, 12(7), 2639; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12072639 - 26 Mar 2020
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 1174
Abstract
In order to study the quality of organic fractions of municipal solid waste (OFMSW), five different municipalities in Tuscany were chosen for sampling according to the peculiarities of their collection systems. The five collection systems selected were sampled four times: during March, June, [...] Read more.
In order to study the quality of organic fractions of municipal solid waste (OFMSW), five different municipalities in Tuscany were chosen for sampling according to the peculiarities of their collection systems. The five collection systems selected were sampled four times: during March, June, September and December, for a total of 20 picking analyses. In addition, emphasis was also given to the study of the variability of OFMSW composition related to ultimate, proximate and bromatological analyses. Road container collection systems proved to have a higher content of non-compostable and undesirable fractions (22%±1%) when compared to door-to-door systems (6% ± 1%). During months with lower temperature (March and December), the garden waste content in the OFMSW was negligible, with kitchen waste prevailing. This altered the physical chemical composition of OFMSW, which had a lower lignin content and higher methane production in the months with lower temperatures (272 ± 23 NLCH4 kgTVS−1) compared to June and September (238 ± 14 NLCH4 kgTVS−1). In general, the Tuscan OFMSW had a higher dry matter content (42%) than observed in previous studies. In conclusion, the result could direct possible future operators of anaerobic digestion plants towards the choice of dry and semi-dry technologies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Municipal Solid Waste Management in a Circular Economy)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Article
Characterization of Excavated Waste of Different Ages in View of Multiple Resource Recovery in Landfill Mining
Sustainability 2020, 12(5), 1780; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12051780 - 27 Feb 2020
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 1504
Abstract
With the aim of examining the forcing factors in postmanagement landfills, in this study, excavation waste from nonhazardous municipal waste landfill in Tuscany was characterized for the first time. The specific objective was to estimate the feasibility of sampling and analyzing the excavated [...] Read more.
With the aim of examining the forcing factors in postmanagement landfills, in this study, excavation waste from nonhazardous municipal waste landfill in Tuscany was characterized for the first time. The specific objective was to estimate the feasibility of sampling and analyzing the excavated waste in order to define its properties and provide information about possible landfill mining projects. Based on the biochemical methane potential assays, it was shown that the excavated waste had not yet been stabilized (i.e., with a production of 52.2 ± 28.7 NlCH4/kgTS) in the landfill, probably due to the low excavated waste moisture content (36% ± 6% w/w). Furthermore, excavated waste has a high calorific value, i.e., 15.2 ± 4.1 MJ/kg; the quantity of combustibles in the industrial shredder waste (16 MJ/kg) was rather modest compared to that of municipal solid waste (20.8 MJ/Kg). In conclusion, during large scale excavation of the landfill, it was possible to evaluate how a dedicated treatment plant could be designed to treat and select waste which might appear in a different category. For excavated industrial waste, detailed mechanical sorting may be convenient for end-of-waste recovery to improve calorific value. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Municipal Solid Waste Management in a Circular Economy)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop