Special Issue "Geo-Hazards and Risk Reduction Approaches"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 November 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Stefano Morelli
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Earth Sciences, University of Firenze, Firenze 50121, Italy
Tel. +39 055 2755981
Interests: geohydrological hazards; landslides, floods; geographic information system; spatial analysis; mapping; monitoring and early warning; physical geography; geotechnics; engineering geology
Dr. Veronica Pazzi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Earth Sciences, University of Firenze, Firenze 50121, Italy
Tel. +39 055 2755982
Interests: exploration geophysics; landslides; engineering geology; resilience; natural hazards; remote sensing; seismics; earth sciences
Prof. Ping Lu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Surveying and Geo-Informatics, Tongji University, Shanghai, 200092, China
Interests: remote sensing; landslide; satellite analysis; engineering geology; geo-hazards
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The impact degree of geological events induced by intense endogenous and exogenous forces is unevenly distributed among communities living in hazardous areas. A geological hazard is a potential disaster when natural geological processes impact on anthropic activities, either through loss of life or injury, or through economic loss. Recent investigations also suggest that climate change tends to exacerbate most of the geodisasters. Sometimes unpredictable and sudden, sometimes slow and lingering, various types of disasters continually affect daily lives. The human safety level is the result of differential exposures to these events and of diversified levels of preparation to them. In recent decades, social and economic development and spatial growth of human activities by consuming soil and natural resources have further contributed to creating vulnerability, increasing the challenges of aware societies to cope with extreme geohydrological processes and their effects, encouraging them to react. Such events are to different degrees avoidable or preventable if these hazards are identified and can regardless be mitigated with knowledge and planning, physical and environmental protection measures, and response preparedness.

This Special Issue comprises selected original papers inherent to the analysis of different types of geological hazards, vulnerability domains, exposure to disaster risk, and risk reduction strategies, including structural and nonstructural methodologies such as plans, behavioral procedures, early warning systems, and more. Traditional approaches are accepted, but innovative and sustainable techniques are also encouraged in the field of spaceborne, aerial, and ground-based activities, even in combination with the objective effects of climate change. Numerical and experimental investigations and case-studies addressing the above key topics are welcome. Such a Special Issue is expected to contribute to progress in the field of responsible geological disaster risk mitigation for human beings and their artifacts.

Dr. Stefano Morelli
Dr. Veronica Pazzi
Prof. Ping Lu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Geological hazards
  • Hydraulic hazards
  • Climate change
  • Disaster risk reduction strategies
  • Structural and nonstructural methodologies
  • Plans and behavioral procedures
  • Early warning systems
  • Responsible and sustainable mitigation

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Multiple Geophysical Techniques for Investigation and Monitoring of Sobradinho Landslide, Brazil
Sustainability 2019, 11(23), 6672; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11236672 - 26 Nov 2019
Abstract
Geophysical methods have a varying degree of potential for detailed characterization of landslides and their dynamics. In this study, the application of four well-established seismic-based geophysical techniques, namely Ambient Noise Interferometry (ANI), Horizontal to Vertical Spectral Ratio (HVSR), Multi-Channel Analysis of Surface Waves [...] Read more.
Geophysical methods have a varying degree of potential for detailed characterization of landslides and their dynamics. In this study, the application of four well-established seismic-based geophysical techniques, namely Ambient Noise Interferometry (ANI), Horizontal to Vertical Spectral Ratio (HVSR), Multi-Channel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) and Nanoseismic Monitoring (NM), were considered to examine their suitability for landslide characterization and monitoring the effect of seasonal variation on slope mass. Furthermore, other methods such as Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) and DC Resistivity through Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) were also used for comparison purpose. The advantages and limitations of these multiple techniques were exemplified by a case study conducted on Sobradinho landslide in Brazil. The study revealed that the geophysical characterization of the landslide using traditional techniques (i.e., GPR, ERT and MASW) were successful in (i) the differentiation between landslide debris and other Quaternary deposits, and (ii) the delineation of the landslide sliding surface. However, the innovative seismic based techniques, particularly ambient noise based (HVSR and ANI) and emitted seismic based (NM), were not very effective for the dynamic monitoring of landslide, which might be attributed to the short-time duration of the data acquisition campaigns. The HVSR was also unsuccessful in landslide site characterization i.e., identification of geometry and sliding surface. In particular, there was no clear evidence of the light seasonal variations, which could have been potentially detected from the physical parameters during the (short-time) ambient noise and microseismic acquisition campaigns. Nevertheless, the experienced integration of these geophysical techniques may provide a promising tool for future applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geo-Hazards and Risk Reduction Approaches)
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