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GIS Implementation in Sustainable Urban Planning

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainability in Geographic Science".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2024 | Viewed by 1028

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Geosciences, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762, USA
Interests: geospatial big data exploration; hydraulic fracturing; landscape epidemiology; remote sensing; ecological systems; geospatial modeling
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
School of Resource and Environmental Science, Key Laboratory of Western China's Environmental Systems, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000, China
Interests: urban and rural development; urban planning; urban transformation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are experiencing a geospatial technology revolution era. Geospatial technologies, especially the integration of GI science, GI system, and GI data science technologies, play critical roles in strategy development, decision making, and society planning. As urban areas are complex systems that include the physical environment, population environment, and human and cultural environment, their development and sustainability require diverse spatial information from multiple dimensions. 

Besides the populations, resources, and environments related to urban poverty and urban segmentation, urban development faces additional serious challenges caused by climate change. Recent tremendous floods, drought, and heat have resulted in severe damage in different cities across the world. Social and environmental (in)justice and equity issues have become emerging complicated crises in cities in both developing and developed regions. GIS provides and explores vector data, raster data and their integration, as well as enabling geospatial intelligent data mining and deep learning for smart decision making and policy development to cope with the challenges from both inside and outside of cities. This makes cities more resistant to abnormal natural and human impacts.

The aim of this Special Issue is to publish novel and innovative GIS applications related to urban studies and urban planning to address one or multiple challenges currently facing cities, as discussed above.

This Special Issue will include any submissions focusing on the topics listed, but topics are not limited to only the following:

  • Urban and regional planning;
  • Land use and planning;
  • Functional city zoning and planning;
  • Urban infrastructure and analysis;
  • Urban transportation and management;
  • Urban forest and management;
  • Urban hazards and analysis;
  • Crime mapping and analysis;
  • Solid waste mapping and management;
  • Urban resilience and sustainability.

In this Special Issue, original research articles and reviews are welcome.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Sincerely,

Dr. Qingmin Meng
Dr. Yongchun Yang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • resilience and sustainability
  • urban development and planning
  • land use and planning
  • zoning and mapping
  • infrastructure analysis
  • urban forest
  • urban hazards
  • crime analysis and mapping

Published Papers (2 papers)

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22 pages, 9709 KiB  
Article
Analysis of Urban Expansion and Heat-Island Effect of Hefei Based on ENVI
by Junlei Meng and Yang Gao
Sustainability 2024, 16(14), 5893; https://doi.org/10.3390/su16145893 - 10 Jul 2024
Viewed by 303
Abstract
Urbanization is one of the most significant features of current social progress. Using Landsat TM/OLI images from 1995, 2005, and 2018, the land-use change, vegetation coverage, and land surface temperature retrieval of Hefei are studied, and the driving force of Hefei’s expansion is [...] Read more.
Urbanization is one of the most significant features of current social progress. Using Landsat TM/OLI images from 1995, 2005, and 2018, the land-use change, vegetation coverage, and land surface temperature retrieval of Hefei are studied, and the driving force of Hefei’s expansion is analyzed. The influence of urban expansion and vegetation coverage on the intensity of the urban heat-island effect is discussed. As the city develops, various factors, such as natural conditions, economic growth, demographic changes, and policy decisions, are driving the expansion of construction land in Hefei. The overall performance shows expansion to the southwest of the main urban area, the surface temperature rises as the city expands, and the area of the heat-island effect also increases, showing the trend of multi-center distribution. There is a clear negative correlation between land surface temperature and vegetation coverage. Therefore, increasing the city’s green infrastructure can effectively alleviate the severe heat-island effect. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue GIS Implementation in Sustainable Urban Planning)
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26 pages, 8587 KiB  
Systematic Review
Urban Disparity Analytics Using GIS: A Systematic Review
by Tanmoy Malaker and Qingmin Meng
Sustainability 2024, 16(14), 5956; https://doi.org/10.3390/su16145956 - 12 Jul 2024
Viewed by 323
Abstract
Urban disparity has been extensively studied using geospatial technology, yet a comprehensive review of GIS applications in this field is essential to address the current research status, potential challenges, and future trends. This review combines bibliometric analysis from two databases, Web of Science [...] Read more.
Urban disparity has been extensively studied using geospatial technology, yet a comprehensive review of GIS applications in this field is essential to address the current research status, potential challenges, and future trends. This review combines bibliometric analysis from two databases, Web of Science (WOS) and Scopus, encompassing 145 articles from WOS and 80 from Scopus, resulting in a final list of 201 articles after excluding 24 duplicates. This approach ensures a comprehensive understanding of urban disparities and the extensive applications of GIS technology. The review highlights and characterizes research status and frontiers into research clusters, future scopes, and gaps in urban disparity analysis. The use of both WOS and Scopus ensures the review’s credibility and comprehensiveness. Findings indicate that most research has focused on accessibility analysis of urban services and facilities. However, there is a recent paradigm shift toward environmental justice, demonstrated by increasing GIS applications in analyzing pollution exposure, urban heat islands, vegetation distribution, disaster vulnerability, and health vulnerability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue GIS Implementation in Sustainable Urban Planning)
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