Advances in Industrial Wastewater Treatment and Reclamation

A special issue of Processes (ISSN 2227-9717). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental and Green Processes".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2024 | Viewed by 1838

Special Issue Editors

Department of Chemical Engineering, Khalifa University of Science and Technology, Abu Dhabi 127788, United Arab Emirates
Interests: water and wastewater treatment; membrane separation; nanoparticles; green synthesis and biomass valorization; energy and biofuels
School of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, Nanyang Technological University, 62 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637459, Singapore
Interests: bioprocesses for water treatment; microalgae technology; sustainable processes; renewable energy; chemical & environmental engineering
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Since the turn of this century, global water consumption has increased by over 600%. A large percentage of this increase could be attributed to the rapid development of industrial facilities. In most industries, the majority of water consumed is disposed of as industrial wastewater (IWW). Humans and our ecosystem are adversely affected by IWW releases into the environment. It is, therefore, necessary to explore options to obtain enough water for industrial development as well as ensure adequate treatment of IWW to comply with increasingly stringent discharge standards. A suitable option for meeting both challenges is to reclaim treated industrial effluent. New knowledge must be developed by the research community to fulfill this vision, such as innovative technologies for treating and reclaiming different types of wastewater, resource recovery from wastewater, etc.

The characteristics of IWW are much more variable and contain numerous inorganic and organic pollutants. It is, therefore, often inadequate to rely solely on biological treatment technologies for meeting stringent discharge standards of treated IWW. There are also alternative methods for treating recalcitrant organics, including advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) and separation processes. However, AOPs usually consume a large amount of energy (e.g., ozone generation and UV radiation) and chemicals (e.g., oxidants and catalysts), making them an expensive process. Meanwhile, separation processes (such as adsorption, filtration, and ion exchange) have been applied to the removal of pollutants and resource recovery, but there is still a need for innovative strategies to reduce their costs. Thus, the development of innovative technologies and building on existing technologies for IWW treatment and reclamation are therefore required.

This special issue will focus on the novel technologies and integrated processes for IWW treatment towards resource reclamation, e.g., water reuse and nutrient recovery. Research related to new developments in existing technologies for IWW treatment is also covered. Moreover, the issue focuses on meeting the needs of the industrial sector from a global perspective, which is a key aspect of sustainable water management. Scientific knowledge collected through this special issue will be valuable to the engineering community as it pertains to the treatment and reclamation of IWW. Research papers and reviews, not limited to, are welcome in the following areas:

  • Industrial wastewater treatment systems
  • Innovative and integrated technologies for IWW treatment
  • Resource recovery and water reuse from IWW
  • Advanced strategies for IWW management
  • Proven case studies for treatment and reclamation of IWW
  • Environmental and human health effects of IWW and their mitigation
  • Bio-processes to produce platform chemicals from wastes
  • Life-cycle assessment

Dr. Krishnamoorthy Rambabu
Dr. Kit Wayne Chew
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Processes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • adsorption
  • advanced oxidation processes
  • algal treatment
  • biological processes
  • bioremediation
  • catalysts
  • filtration
  • integrated processes
  • life cycle assessment
  • membranes
  • nanotechnology
  • resource recovery
  • waste-to-energy
  • wastewater treatment
  • water reclamation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 3027 KiB  
Article
Development of a Novel Hydrodynamic Sequencing Batch Reactor for Landfill Leachate Treatment by Shortcut Biological Nitrogen Removal
Processes 2023, 11(7), 1868; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr11071868 - 21 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 588
Abstract
This study introduced an alternative shortcut biological nitrogen removal (SBNR) process for landfill leachate treatment by developing a novel hydrodynamic sequencing batch reactor (H-SBR). The reactor could enhance the oxygen transfer rate (OTR) and nitrite accumulation ratio (NAR) by modifying internal hydrodynamic turbulence [...] Read more.
This study introduced an alternative shortcut biological nitrogen removal (SBNR) process for landfill leachate treatment by developing a novel hydrodynamic sequencing batch reactor (H-SBR). The reactor could enhance the oxygen transfer rate (OTR) and nitrite accumulation ratio (NAR) by modifying internal hydrodynamic turbulence intensity. The average chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total nitrogen (TN) concentrations introduced into the reactor were 660 and 250 mg L−1, respectively, and the average removal efficiencies were 93% (COD) and 96% (TN). The effect of geometric parameters on oxygen transfer was estimated by performing a hydrodynamic model and a nonlinear least square analysis. After correcting the constants (α and β) of mass transfer coefficients (KLa) to values of 0.7361 and 1.2639, the model data fit the experiment well with an R-squared value of 0.99. The OTR improved by up to 30%, and hence, increased the NAR by up to 20% with a reduction of about 0.5 kg N kW−1 for power efficiency. The H-SBR development is innovative because the oxygen transfer efficiency was improved by the hydrodynamic modification of internal turbulence intensity, although not by mechanical equipment or chemical supplements. For the SBNR process, the modification of the reactor configuration for OTR enhancement could significantly improve nitrogen removal efficiency with successful nitrite accumulation. In addition to landfill leachate treatment, the H-SBR process can be employed in the treatment of low C/N ratio wastewaters. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Industrial Wastewater Treatment and Reclamation)
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12 pages, 1487 KiB  
Article
Enhancement of Electrochemical–Anaerobic Digested Palm Oil Mill Effluent Waste Activated Sludge in Solids Minimization and Biogas Production: Bench–Scale Verification
Processes 2023, 11(6), 1609; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr11061609 - 25 May 2023
Viewed by 966
Abstract
The development of the palm oil industry has induced the generation of palm oil mill effluent (POME) together with its waste activated sludge (WAS) in recent years. This study aims to discover new opportunities in treating POME WAS that has high organic content [...] Read more.
The development of the palm oil industry has induced the generation of palm oil mill effluent (POME) together with its waste activated sludge (WAS) in recent years. This study aims to discover new opportunities in treating POME WAS that has high organic content with low degradability but having potential in converting waste into energy. The optimized electrochemical oxidation (EO) of pre-treated WAS was applied prior to anaerobic digestion (AD) to improve the POME WAS digestibility (by assessing its solids minimization and biogas production) under mesophilic conditions at 30 ± 0.5 °C and solids retention time of 15 days. The enhancement in sludge minimization was verified, with 1.6-fold over the control at steady-state. Promising results were obtained with a total chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal of 68.8% with 11.47 mL CH4/g CODadded in pre-treat digester, compared with 37.1% and 3.9 mL CH4/g CODadded in control digester. It is also worth noting that the specific energy (SE) obtained for this EO pre-treated AD system is 2505 kJ/kg TS with about 94% increment in methane production. It is evident that this system was applicable on POME WAS in ameliorating solids minimization as well as enhancing biogas production. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Industrial Wastewater Treatment and Reclamation)
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