Advances in Natural Products Extraction and Their Potential Applications in Food Processes

A special issue of Processes (ISSN 2227-9717). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Process Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 February 2024) | Viewed by 5820

Special Issue Editors

Chemistry School, Autonomous University of Chihuahua, Chihuahua 31125, PC, Mexico
Interests: valorization of food waste; extraction and use of plant-derived compounds in food processes; food nano- and micro-emulsions; plant extracts and their effect on human digestive enzymes; food rheology; dairy processing
Center of Excellence in Sustainable Food and Agricultural Systems, New Mexico State University, 940 College Dr, Room 308, Las Cruces, NM 88005, USA
Interests: functional foods; value-added and food processing; utilization of agro-industrial bioproducts; microencapsulation; cereal technology; extrusion technology; meat processing
Department of Hygiene and Food Technology, Veterinary Faculty, University of Leon, 24071 Leon, CP, Spain
Interests: food science and technology; volatile compounds; reformulation of food products; meat technology
Chemistry Faculty, Autonomous University of Chihuahua, Chihuahua 31125, Mexico
Interests: sustainable food processing; bioactives extraction; sustainable food systems
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nowadays, more and more consumers worldwide look for healthy foods or products with fewer or no "artificial" additives. Therefore, the food industry faces the challenge of adapting its processes to meet market requirements. Scientists worldwide have addressed this problem by exploring natural compounds that could be used in food processes such as microencapsulation, extrusion, thermal and non-thermal treatments, high pressures, etc. These compounds include saccharides, proteins, enzymes, vitamins, lipids, polyphenols, colors, flavors, antimicrobials, and antifungals. Furthermore, various natural sources have been studied for extracting bioactive compounds, for instance, plants, fungi, insects, microbes, and animals. We also recognize the current tendency to explore endemic sources and agro-industrial byproducts as a source of valuable bioactive compounds with potential use in the food industry.

In this context, we invite authors to contribute to this Special Issue by providing original research articles and reviews related to recent advances in the extraction of natural products and their potential use in food processes.

Prof. Dr. Néstor Gutiérrez-Méndez
Dr. Efren Delgado
Dr. Javier Mateo
Dr. Samuel Perez-Vega
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Processes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • new protein sources
  • new saccharide sources
  • utilization of agro-industrial byproducts
  • new sources of bioactive compounds
  • functional foods
  • natural flavors
  • natural colors
  • antimicrobial activity
  • microencapsulation
  • nanoencapsulation
  • extrusion

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

19 pages, 2549 KiB  
Article
Extraction and Microencapsulation of Phytochemical Compounds from Mango Peel (Mangifera indica L.) var. “Kent” and Assessment of Bioaccessibility through In Vitro Digestion
Processes 2024, 12(1), 154; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr12010154 - 09 Jan 2024
Viewed by 659
Abstract
The peel from mango (Mangifera indica L.) var. “Kent” is a good source of bioactive compounds (BC). BC are sensitive to oxygen, temperature, humidity, light, and gastrointestinal digestion, which change their biological function and health benefits. This study was aimed at the [...] Read more.
The peel from mango (Mangifera indica L.) var. “Kent” is a good source of bioactive compounds (BC). BC are sensitive to oxygen, temperature, humidity, light, and gastrointestinal digestion, which change their biological function and health benefits. This study was aimed at the extraction of the bioactive compounds present in the peel from mango var. “Kent” and their microencapsulation using spray drying (SD) and spout-fluid bed drying (SFB). The bioaccessibility of BC was also evaluated. Two consecutive extractions of 90 min at 30 °C and 80% v/v ethanol were used. The microcapsules produced via SD and SFB presented high retention and encapsulation percentages of the bioactive compounds; nevertheless, SFB showed better protection during in vitro gastrointestinal digestion. The non-encapsulated extract showed a decrease (p ≤ 0.05) of BC at the end of in vitro gastrointestinal digestion. The results show that these microcapsules might be used in the food industry as an ingredient to produce functional foods and, thereby, to obtain the health benefits that the bioactive compounds provide. Full article
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20 pages, 2956 KiB  
Article
Sequential Processing Using Supercritical Carbon Dioxide and High-Intensity Ultrasound in Sunflower Protein Flour Production: Nutritional Value, Microstructure, and Technological Functionality
Processes 2023, 11(8), 2407; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr11082407 - 10 Aug 2023
Viewed by 895
Abstract
Sunflowers are among the world’s most widely cultivated oilseeds with an interesting nutritional composition. A biomass composed mainly of carbohydrates, fibers, and proteins is generated from sunflower oil production. In this context, the objective of this study was to investigate the application of [...] Read more.
Sunflowers are among the world’s most widely cultivated oilseeds with an interesting nutritional composition. A biomass composed mainly of carbohydrates, fibers, and proteins is generated from sunflower oil production. In this context, the objective of this study was to investigate the application of emerging technologies to sunflower biomass to obtain an edible protein-rich flour with the potential to be exploited in the food industry. The effects of the optimized conditions for the sequential processing of sunflower meal using supercritical carbon dioxide (SCO2) and high-intensity ultrasound (HIUS) were investigated. The protein structure was preserved even after the application of HIUS to the flour as verified through differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and the electrophoresis curves. The fact that the HIUS treatment did not modify the protein structure demonstrates that this emerging technology could be incorporated into the processing chain of this new food ingredient (sunflower flour) without promoting damage to the nutritional value of the product regarding its protein content. At a pH of 7.0, the flour showed only 30% solubility, and HIUS application improved both the formation and the stability of the emulsion when compared to the other samples. The preliminary evaluation of cell viability (caco2 cells) showed its protective potential against reactive oxygen species. Therefore, the flour resulting from the green processes presented the potential to be employed as an ingredient in the food industry, presenting a technological and nutritional potential when considering its chemical composition. In addition to the novel edible flour, the phenolic compounds obtained a present potential as a functional ingredient to be incorporated into foods. Full article
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18 pages, 970 KiB  
Article
Oxidative Effects of Raw Chickpea in Reformulated Pork Patties: Level of Chickpea, Temperature, and Use of Selected Natural Antioxidants
Processes 2023, 11(7), 2062; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr11072062 - 10 Jul 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 719
Abstract
Raw pulses as extenders in meat preparations result in oxidative processes. The oxidative effects of using a raw chickpea paste (CP; 1/2; chickpea/water) in pork patties were evaluated. In a first experiment, patties were prepared with increasing levels of CP (0 to 25%); [...] Read more.
Raw pulses as extenders in meat preparations result in oxidative processes. The oxidative effects of using a raw chickpea paste (CP; 1/2; chickpea/water) in pork patties were evaluated. In a first experiment, patties were prepared with increasing levels of CP (0 to 25%); in a second experiment, patties with CP (25%) and without CP (controls) were kept at 4 °C or 22 °C for 18 h before patty production; in a third experiment, chitosan, garlic, and cumin (from 0.5 to 2%) were added in patties with CP (25%) and controls, and their antioxidant effects were evaluated. Patties were analysed for pH, colour, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) on days 1, 3, and 7 of refrigerated aerobic storage. Discoloration on day 1 and TBARS levels on days 1 to 7 of storage increased with the CP used. Higher batter temperature after mixing did not activate oxidative processes in the CP patties. Garlic showed pro-oxidant effects in controls and no effects in the CP patties. Chitosan and cumin did not reduce CP patties oxidation on the first day of storage, but they controlled oxidation during subsequent storage. More research is needed to prevent oxidation caused by using raw chickpeas in meat preparations. Full article
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17 pages, 571 KiB  
Article
Ataulfo Mango (Mangifera indica L.) Peel Extract as a Potential Natural Antioxidant in Ground Beef
Processes 2023, 11(6), 1772; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr11061772 - 10 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1886
Abstract
Total phenolic content (TPC), total flavonoid content (TFC), antioxidant and antimicrobial in vitro activity of ethanolic (EE) and hydroethanolic (HE) extracts of mango peel Ataulfo were evaluated. The highest TPC, TFC and antioxidant capacity were as shown in EE. Ethanolic extract was incorporated [...] Read more.
Total phenolic content (TPC), total flavonoid content (TFC), antioxidant and antimicrobial in vitro activity of ethanolic (EE) and hydroethanolic (HE) extracts of mango peel Ataulfo were evaluated. The highest TPC, TFC and antioxidant capacity were as shown in EE. Ethanolic extract was incorporated into ground beef at 1000 (BBEA) and 2000 mg/kg meat (BEEB) concentrations and then compared with 250 mg of sodium ascorbate/kg meat (ASC) along with a control (without antioxidant). The effects of adding EE on instrumental colour, metmyoglobin content, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), pH, microbial load and sensorial analysis of ground beef were evaluated for 11 days at 4 °C. BEEB added in raw ground beef improved colour stability while the lipid oxidation in raw and raw-cooked ground beef was inhibited with a greater antioxidant effect than ASC and a similar overall acceptability score (cooked ground beef). However, incorporating BEEB into ground beef did not show significant antimicrobial activity. Therefore, mango peel extracts could potentially be used as a natural antioxidant in ground beef. Full article
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12 pages, 1496 KiB  
Article
Pectin from Three Vietnamese Seagrasses: Isolation, Characterization and Antioxidant Activity
Processes 2023, 11(4), 1054; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr11041054 - 31 Mar 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1196
Abstract
This study focused on the isolation and structural characterization of pectin from three distinct species of Vietnamese seagrass including Enhalus acoroides, Thalassia hemprichii, and Halophila ovalis. The pectin yield obtained from Enhalus acoroides was the highest, corresponding to 24.15%, followed [...] Read more.
This study focused on the isolation and structural characterization of pectin from three distinct species of Vietnamese seagrass including Enhalus acoroides, Thalassia hemprichii, and Halophila ovalis. The pectin yield obtained from Enhalus acoroides was the highest, corresponding to 24.15%, followed by those from Thalassia hemprichii (20.04%) and Halophila ovalis (19.14%). The physicochemical properties of pectin including total carbohydrate content, anhydrouronic acid (AUA) content, equivalent weight (EW), methoxyl content (MeO), and degree of esterification (DE) were determined using various analysis techniques. The pectin obtained from all three species were found to be low-methyl-esterified pectin, with the MeO content and DE for E. acoroides, T. hemprichii, and H. ovalis being 6.15% and 27.18%, 3.26% and 43.31%, and 4.65% and 33.25%, respectively. The average molecular weight (MW) of pectin was analyzed by size-exclusion chromatography. Pectin from T. hemprichii had the highest MW of 173.01 kDa, followed by pectin from E. acoroides, with a MW of 127.32 kDa, and that from H. ovalis, with a MW of 56.06 kDa. Furthermore, the pectins from all three seagrass species exhibited high antioxidant activity and might be promising as antioxidants. Full article
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