Special Issue "Advanced Ocular Drug Delivery"

A special issue of Pharmaceutics (ISSN 1999-4923).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 December 2017).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Tao L. Lowe
Website
Guest Editor
Pharmaceutical Sciences & Biomedical Engineering, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163, USA
Interests: Biomaterials for Drug Delivery and Tissue Engineering
Dr. Dileep Reddy Janagam

Guest Editor
Plough Center for Sterile Drug Delivery, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163, USA
Interests: Formulation and Drug Delivery; Biomaterials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Because of the presence of various static, dynamic and metabolic ocular barriers, the delivery of drugs to the targeted sites of action in the eye is often very challenging and requires interdisciplinary approaches involving basic, applied and clinical sciences. In recent years, increasing progress has been made to develop novel and safe materials, devices and methods to overcome ocular barriers to deliver therapeutic agents to targeted sites in the eye. This Special Issue invites original technical papers and reviews to discuss the broad scope of recent developments, future directions, possible challenges, and regulatory and ethical issues in advancing ocular drug delivery for clinical and commercial translation. The focus is on, but not limited to biomaterials; nanotechnology; personalized ophthalmology; theranostics; ocular disease targets; biomarkers; ocular transport; ocular pharmacokinetics; industrial development; regulatory and ethical considerations; clinical studies; intellectual property; and commercialization.

Prof. Dr. Tao L. Lowe
Dr. Dileep Reddy Janagam
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pharmaceutics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Ocular drug delivery
  • Ocular barriers
  • Biomaterials
  • Nanotechnology
  • Personalized ophthalmology
  • Theranostics
  • Disease targets
  • Biomarkers
  • Ocular transport
  • Ocular pharmacokinetics
  • Clinical studies
  • Regulatory and ethical considerations
  • Intellectual property
  • Commercialization

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Review

Open AccessReview
Ocular Drug Delivery Barriers—Role of Nanocarriers in the Treatment of Anterior Segment Ocular Diseases
Pharmaceutics 2018, 10(1), 28; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics10010028 - 27 Feb 2018
Cited by 31
Abstract
Ocular drug delivery is challenging due to the presence of anatomical and physiological barriers. These barriers can affect drug entry into the eye following multiple routes of administration (e.g., topical, systemic, and injectable). Topical administration in the form of eye drops is preferred [...] Read more.
Ocular drug delivery is challenging due to the presence of anatomical and physiological barriers. These barriers can affect drug entry into the eye following multiple routes of administration (e.g., topical, systemic, and injectable). Topical administration in the form of eye drops is preferred for treating anterior segment diseases, as it is convenient and provides local delivery of drugs. Major concerns with topical delivery include poor drug absorption and low bioavailability. To improve the bioavailability of topically administered drugs, novel drug delivery systems are being investigated. Nanocarrier delivery systems demonstrate enhanced drug permeation and prolonged drug release. This review provides an overview of ocular barriers to anterior segment delivery, along with ways to overcome these barriers using nanocarrier systems. The disposition of nanocarriers following topical administration, their safety, toxicity and clinical trials involving nanocarrier systems are also discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Ocular Drug Delivery)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessReview
Extended Duration Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Inhibition in the Eye: Failures, Successes, and Future Possibilities
Pharmaceutics 2018, 10(1), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics10010021 - 27 Jan 2018
Cited by 11
Abstract
Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a pivotal role in the development of neovascularization and edema from several common chorioretinal vascular conditions. The intravitreally injected drugs (aflibercept, bevacizumab, conbercept, pegaptanib, and ranibizumab) used to treat these conditions improve the visual acuity and macular [...] Read more.
Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a pivotal role in the development of neovascularization and edema from several common chorioretinal vascular conditions. The intravitreally injected drugs (aflibercept, bevacizumab, conbercept, pegaptanib, and ranibizumab) used to treat these conditions improve the visual acuity and macular morphology in most patients. Monthly or bimonthly injections were administered in the phase III pivotal trials but physicians usually individualize therapy with pro re nata (PRN) or treat and extend regimens. Despite these lower frequency treatment regimens, frequent injections and clinic visits are still needed to produce satisfactory outcomes. Newly developed drugs and refillable reservoirs with favorable pharmacokinetic profiles may extend durations of action and require fewer office visits. However, we have learned from previous experiences that the longer durations of action seen in strategically designed phase III trials often do not translate to less frequent injections in real-life clinical practice. Unfortunately, long-acting therapies that produce soluble VEGF receptors (encapsulated cell technology and adenovirus injected DNA) have failed in phase II trials. The development of longer duration therapies remains a difficult and frustrating process, and frequent drug injections are likely to remain the standard-of-care for years to come. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Ocular Drug Delivery)
Open AccessReview
Ophthalmic Drug Delivery Systems for Antibiotherapy—A Review
Pharmaceutics 2018, 10(1), 10; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics10010010 - 13 Jan 2018
Cited by 17
Abstract
The last fifty years, ophthalmic drug delivery research has made much progress, challenging scientists about the advantages and limitations of this drug delivery approach. Topical eye drops are the most commonly used formulation in ocular drug delivery. Despite the good tolerance for patients, [...] Read more.
The last fifty years, ophthalmic drug delivery research has made much progress, challenging scientists about the advantages and limitations of this drug delivery approach. Topical eye drops are the most commonly used formulation in ocular drug delivery. Despite the good tolerance for patients, this topical administration is only focus on the anterior ocular diseases and had a high precorneal loss of drugs due to the tears production and ocular barriers. Antibiotics are popularly used in solution or in ointment for the ophthalmic route. However, their local bioavailability needs to be improved in order to decrease the frequency of administrations and the side effects and to increase their therapeutic efficiency. For this purpose, sustained release forms for ophthalmic delivery of antibiotics were developed. This review briefly describes the ocular administration with the ocular barriers and the currently topical forms. It focuses on experimental results to bypass the limitations of ocular antibiotic delivery with new ocular technology as colloidal and in situ gelling systems or with the improvement of existing forms as implants and contact lenses. Nanotechnology is presently a promising drug delivery way to provide protection of antibiotics and improve pathway through ocular barriers and deliver drugs to specific target sites. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Ocular Drug Delivery)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop