Special Issue "Non-Ionic Surfactant Vesicles for Drug Delivery"

A special issue of Pharmaceutics (ISSN 1999-4923).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 December 2018).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Rita Muzzalupo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Pharmacy, Health and Nutritional Sciences, University of Calabria, Rende (CS), Italy
Interests: colloidal systems; niosomes; hydrogels; drug targeting; dermal delivery; lyotropic liquid crystal
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The self-assembly of non-ionic surfactants in vesicular structures is an object of research in pharmaceutical technology. In particular, these formulations have been developed for the many advantages offered by these systems, for example, the ability to increase the capacity of delivery vehicles as drug release control, to reduce drug side effects, to increase drug solubilization, to reduce drug degradation, and also to control drug uptake and biological response.

An efficient therapeutic strategy involves choices about, not only of the drug, but also of the drug delivery system and the administration route. Furthermore, the development of target vesicular structures based on non-ionic surfactants seems to be an interesting way to improve the bioavailability of biologically-active substances.

This Special Issue aims to provide a collection of innovative approaches in drug delivery developed in the last decade and we see in vesicles non-ionic surfactants the main protagonists.

We invite you to contribute to this Special Issue with your research to highlight the potential of such systems for the development of nanomedicines.

Prof. Rita Muzzalupo
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • non-ionic surfactant
  • niosomes
  • vesicles
  • drug delivery
  • target release
  • stimuli response vesicles

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Targeted Transfection Using PEGylated Cationic Liposomes Directed Towards P-Selectin Increases siRNA Delivery into Activated Endothelial Cells
Pharmaceutics 2019, 11(1), 47; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics11010047 - 21 Jan 2019
Cited by 4
Abstract
: The progress in small-interfering RNA (siRNA) therapeutics depends on the development of suitable nanocarriers to perform specific and effective delivery to dysfunctional cells. In this paper, we questioned whether P-selectin, a cell adhesion molecule specifically expressed on the surface of activated endothelial [...] Read more.
: The progress in small-interfering RNA (siRNA) therapeutics depends on the development of suitable nanocarriers to perform specific and effective delivery to dysfunctional cells. In this paper, we questioned whether P-selectin, a cell adhesion molecule specifically expressed on the surface of activated endothelial cells (EC) could be employed as a target for nanotherapeutic intervention. To this purpose, we developed and characterized P-selectin targeted PEGylated cationic liposomes able to efficiently pack siRNA and to function as efficient vectors for siRNA delivery to tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) activated EC. Targeted cationic liposomes were obtained by coupling a peptide with high affinity for P-selectin to a functionalized PEGylated phospholipid inserted in the liposomes’ bilayer (Psel-lipo). As control, scrambled peptide coupled cationic liposomes (Scr-lipo) were used. The lipoplexes obtained by complexation of Psel-lipo with siRNA (Psel-lipo/siRNA) were taken up specifically and at a higher extent by TNF-α activated b.End3 endothelial cells as compared to non-targeted Scr-lipo/siRNA. The Psel-lipo/siRNA delivered with high efficiency siRNA into the cells. The lipoplexes were functional as demonstrated by the down-regulation of the selected gene (GAPDH). The results demonstrate an effective targeted delivery of siRNA into cultured activated endothelial cells using P-selectin directed PEGylated cationic liposomes, which subsequently knock-down the desired gene. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non-Ionic Surfactant Vesicles for Drug Delivery)
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Open AccessArticle
A New Generation of Dihydropyridine Calcium Channel Blockers: Photostabilization of Liquid Formulations Using Nonionic Surfactants
Pharmaceutics 2019, 11(1), 28; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics11010028 - 11 Jan 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
The stability profile of a new 1,4-dihydropyridine derivative (DHP), representative of a series with a hexahydroquinoline ring, was studied to design light-stable liquid formulations. This molecule, named M3, has been shown among the analogs to have a high capacity to block both L- [...] Read more.
The stability profile of a new 1,4-dihydropyridine derivative (DHP), representative of a series with a hexahydroquinoline ring, was studied to design light-stable liquid formulations. This molecule, named M3, has been shown among the analogs to have a high capacity to block both L- and T-type calcium channels. The ethanol solution of the drug was subjected to a photodegradation test, in accordance with standard rules. The concentrations of the drug and its byproducts were estimated using multivariate curve resolution, applied to the spectral data collected during the test. The improvement of both the photostability and water solubility of M3 was investigated by adding the surfactant polysorbate 20 in a 1:5 ratio to aqueous solutions of the drug. These formulations were exposed to stressing light in containers of bleu polyethylene terephthalate (PET), amber PET, and covered amber PET. The best results were obtained when using the covered amber PET container, reaching a degradation percentage of the drug less than 5% after 12 h under an irradiance power of 450 W/m2. The stability of the compound was compared to that of nimodipine (NIM) under the same conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non-Ionic Surfactant Vesicles for Drug Delivery)
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Open AccessArticle
Brief Effect of a Small Hydrophobic Drug (Cinnarizine) on the Physicochemical Characterisation of Niosomes Produced by Thin-Film Hydration and Microfluidic Methods
Pharmaceutics 2018, 10(4), 185; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics10040185 - 13 Oct 2018
Cited by 3
Abstract
Novel niosomal formulations containing cinnarizine were developed to enhance its drug characteristics. In this work, niosomes (non-ionic surfactant vesicles) were prepared by conventional thin-film hydration (TFH) and microfluidic (MF) methods with sorbitan monostearate (Span® 60), cholesterol, and co-surfactants (Cremophor® ELP, Cremophor [...] Read more.
Novel niosomal formulations containing cinnarizine were developed to enhance its drug characteristics. In this work, niosomes (non-ionic surfactant vesicles) were prepared by conventional thin-film hydration (TFH) and microfluidic (MF) methods with sorbitan monostearate (Span® 60), cholesterol, and co-surfactants (Cremophor® ELP, Cremophor® RH40 and Solutol® HS15) as key excipients. The aim was to study the effect of cinnarizine on the characteristics of different niosomal formulations manufactured by using different methods. For effective targeted oral drug delivery, the efficacy of niosomes for therapeutic applications is correlated to their physiochemical properties. Niosome vesicles prepared were characterised using dynamic light scattering technique and the morphology of niosomes dispersion was characterised using optical microscopy. Dialysis was carried out to purify niosome suspensions to determine drug loading and drug release studies was performed to study the potential use of niosomal systems for cinnarizine. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non-Ionic Surfactant Vesicles for Drug Delivery)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Advances of Non-Ionic Surfactant Vesicles (Niosomes) and Their Application in Drug Delivery
Pharmaceutics 2019, 11(2), 55; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics11020055 - 29 Jan 2019
Cited by 9
Abstract
Non-Ionic surfactant based vesicles, also known as niosomes, have attracted much attention in pharmaceutical fields due to their excellent behavior in encapsulating both hydrophilic and hydrophobic agents. In recent years, it has been discovered that these vesicles can improve the bioavailability of drugs, [...] Read more.
Non-Ionic surfactant based vesicles, also known as niosomes, have attracted much attention in pharmaceutical fields due to their excellent behavior in encapsulating both hydrophilic and hydrophobic agents. In recent years, it has been discovered that these vesicles can improve the bioavailability of drugs, and may function as a new strategy for delivering several typical of therapeutic agents, such as chemical drugs, protein drugs and gene materials with low toxicity and desired targeting efficiency. Compared with liposomes, niosomes are much more stable during the formulation process and storage. The required pharmacokinetic properties can be achieved by optimizing components or by surface modification. This novel delivery system is also easy to prepare and scale up with low production costs. In this paper, we summarize the structure, components, formulation methods, quality control of niosome and its applications in chemical drugs, protein drugs and gene delivery. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non-Ionic Surfactant Vesicles for Drug Delivery)
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Open AccessReview
Cationic Niosomes as Non-Viral Vehicles for Nucleic Acids: Challenges and Opportunities in Gene Delivery
Pharmaceutics 2019, 11(2), 50; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics11020050 - 22 Jan 2019
Cited by 4
Abstract
Cationic niosomes have become important non-viral vehicles for transporting a good number of small drug molecules and macromolecules. Growing interest shown by these colloidal nanoparticles in therapy is determined by their structural similarities to liposomes. Cationic niosomes are usually obtained from the self-assembly [...] Read more.
Cationic niosomes have become important non-viral vehicles for transporting a good number of small drug molecules and macromolecules. Growing interest shown by these colloidal nanoparticles in therapy is determined by their structural similarities to liposomes. Cationic niosomes are usually obtained from the self-assembly of non-ionic surfactant molecules. This process can be governed not only by the nature of such surfactants but also by others factors like the presence of additives, formulation preparation and properties of the encapsulated hydrophobic or hydrophilic molecules. This review is aimed at providing recent information for using cationic niosomes for gene delivery purposes with particular emphasis on improving the transportation of antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs), small interference RNAs (siRNAs), aptamers and plasmids (pDNA). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non-Ionic Surfactant Vesicles for Drug Delivery)
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Open AccessReview
Thermo-Sensitive Vesicles in Controlled Drug Delivery for Chemotherapy
Pharmaceutics 2018, 10(3), 150; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics10030150 - 05 Sep 2018
Cited by 5
Abstract
Thermo-sensitive vesicles are a promising tool for triggering the release of drugs to solid tumours when used in combination with mild hyperthermia. Responsivity to temperature makes them intelligent nanodevices able to provide a site-specific chemotherapy. Following a brief introduction concerning hyperthermia and its [...] Read more.
Thermo-sensitive vesicles are a promising tool for triggering the release of drugs to solid tumours when used in combination with mild hyperthermia. Responsivity to temperature makes them intelligent nanodevices able to provide a site-specific chemotherapy. Following a brief introduction concerning hyperthermia and its advantageous combination with vesicular systems, recent investigations on thermo-sensitive vesicles useful for controlled drug delivery in cancer treatment are reported in this review. In particular, the influence of bilayer composition on the in vitro and in vivo behaviour of thermo-sensitive formulations currently under investigation have been extensively explored. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non-Ionic Surfactant Vesicles for Drug Delivery)
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