Special Issue "Brain Theranostics: Focus on Drug Delivery and Outcomes"

A special issue of Pharmaceuticals (ISSN 1424-8247). This special issue belongs to the section "Pharmaceutical Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 February 2023 | Viewed by 1728

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Aditya N. Bade
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Assistant Professor, Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Neuroscience, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, USA
Interests: neurodevelopmental biology; neurodegenerative disorders; drug delivery; bioimaging; toxicology; biomarker discovery

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Brain theranostics is an emerging research field, integrating “therapeutics” and “diagnostics”. The theranostics approach provides new modalities to improve the diagnostic specificity of brain diseases and to develop and investigate the efficacy of newly developed or repurposed therapeutic compounds, and of targeted and controlled drug delivery schemes. Such a promising field involves concepts associated with the design of probes to image brain diseases, the development of non-invasive bioimaging modalities with high sensitivity and specificity to track biomarkers, the identification of disease-associated mechanisms, and the engineering of delivery platforms such as nanoformulations and extracellular vesicles to improve delivery across the blood–brain barrier (BBB) for effective treatment outcomes.  

The objective of this Special Issue is to invite leading experts in the fields of neurodegenerative diseases, neurodevelopmental disorders, neurobehavioral biology, drug-induced neurotoxicity, bioimaging and nanomedicine to discuss their most recent discoveries, and to share their vision for future development in associated topics. Spontaneous submissions are welcome. Both original unpublished research articles and reviews will be considered.

Topics include, but are not limited to:

  1. New techniques to improve the blood–brain barrier (BBB) penetration of theranostic molecules;
  2. Sensitive bioimaging modalities for the detection of brain diseases and/or therapeutic efficacy;
  3. Nanomedicine for the therapy of brain diseases;
  4. New developments for controlled or targeted drug delivery to the brain;
  5. Neurodevelopmental neurotoxicity following in utero exposure to therapeutic drugs and new approaches to improve outcomes;
  6. Neurobehavioral assessments defining brain diseases and therapeutic outcomes;
  7. Novel mechanisms underlying brain diseases.

Dr. Aditya N. Bade
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pharmaceuticals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • brain
  • neurodegenerative diseases
  • therapeutics
  • diagnostics
  • nanomedicine
  • MRI/SPECT/PET
  • blood–brain barrier
  • neurotoxicity
  • behavioral tests

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Brain Targeting of Quetiapine Fumarate via Intranasal Delivery of Loaded Lipospheres: Fabrication, In-Vitro Evaluation, Optimization, and In-Vivo Assessment
Pharmaceuticals 2022, 15(9), 1083; https://doi.org/10.3390/ph15091083 - 30 Aug 2022
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Abstract
A liposphere system for intranasal delivery of quetiapine fumarate (QTF) was created to assess the potential for enhanced drug delivery. We investigated the effects of particle size, entrapment effectiveness, poly dispersibility index, and pluronic incorporation percentage on these variables. The optimal formula was [...] Read more.
A liposphere system for intranasal delivery of quetiapine fumarate (QTF) was created to assess the potential for enhanced drug delivery. We investigated the effects of particle size, entrapment effectiveness, poly dispersibility index, and pluronic incorporation percentage on these variables. The optimal formula was examined using a TEM, and investigations into DSC, XRD, and FTIR were made. Optimized liposphere formulation in vitro dissolution investigation with a mean diameter of 294.4 ± 18.2 nm revealed about 80% drug release in 6 h. The intranasal injection of QTF-loaded lipospheres showed a shorter Tmax compared to that of intranasal and oral suspension, per the findings of an in vivo tissue distribution investigation in Wistar mice. Lipospheres were able to achieve higher drug transport efficiency (DTE %) and direct nose-to-brain drug transfer (DTP %). A potentially effective method for delivering QTF to specific brain regions is the liposphere system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Brain Theranostics: Focus on Drug Delivery and Outcomes)
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Review

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Review
HIV-1 Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitors and Neurodevelopment
Pharmaceuticals 2022, 15(12), 1533; https://doi.org/10.3390/ph15121533 - 09 Dec 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 624
Abstract
Children born to mothers, with or at risk, of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection are on the rise due to affordable access of antiretroviral therapy (ART) to pregnant women or those of childbearing age. Each year, up to 1.3 million HIV-1-infected women [...] Read more.
Children born to mothers, with or at risk, of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection are on the rise due to affordable access of antiretroviral therapy (ART) to pregnant women or those of childbearing age. Each year, up to 1.3 million HIV-1-infected women on ART have given birth with recorded mother-to-child HIV-1 transmission rates of less than 1%. Despite this benefit, the outcomes of children exposed to antiretroviral drugs during pregnancy, especially pre- and post- natal neurodevelopment remain incompletely understood. This is due, in part, to the fact that pregnant women are underrepresented in clinical trials. This is underscored by any potential risks of neural tube defects (NTDs) linked, in measure, to periconceptional usage of dolutegravir (DTG). A potential association between DTG and NTDs was first described in Botswana in 2018. Incidence studies of neurodevelopmental outcomes associated with DTG, and other integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) are limited as widespread use of INSTIs has begun only recently in pregnant women. Therefore, any associations between INSTI use during pregnancy, and neurodevelopmental abnormalities remain to be explored. Herein, United States Food and Drug Administration approved ARVs and their use during pregnancy are discussed. We provide updates on INSTI pharmacokinetics and adverse events during pregnancy together with underlying mechanisms which could affect fetal neurodevelopment. Overall, this review seeks to educate both clinical and basic scientists on potential consequences of INSTIs on fetal outcomes as a foundation for future scientific investigations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Brain Theranostics: Focus on Drug Delivery and Outcomes)
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