Long Noncoding RNAs as Pharmacological Targets in Neurological Diseases

A special issue of Pharmaceuticals (ISSN 1424-8247). This special issue belongs to the section "Pharmacology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 22 June 2024 | Viewed by 2620

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences "L. Sacco", University of Milan, Milan, Italy
2. Pediatric Research Center "Romeo ed Enrica Invernizzi", University of Milan, Milan, Italy
Interests: lncRNAs, stem cells biology, neurodegenerative diseases, neurodevelopmental disorders, molecular mechanisms of neuronal degeneration and regeneration (epigenetics and non-coding RNA); transcriptional profiling of diseases conditions
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences "L. Sacco", University of Milan, Milan, Italy
2. Pediatric Research Center "Romeo ed Enrica Invernizzi", University of Milan, Milan, Italy
Interests: cell therapies for neurodegenerative disease (spinal cord injury, Parkinson’s disease); molecular mechanisms of neuronal degeneration and regeneration (epigenetic and non-coding RNA); organoids; 3D culture systems; neural stem cells; mesenchymal stem cells, neurodevelopmental disorders
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, the fundamental role of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) is appearing more and more relevant. These are RNA molecules longer than 200bp, with multiple functions in both physiological and diseases-related processes. Indeed, they present a gene expression regulatory ability, although their role is not limited to this function. Several well-studied examples of lncRNAs suggest that they can operate through distinct modes, including working as signals, scaffolds for protein-protein interactions, molecular decoys, and guides to target elements in the genome or transcriptome. More and more research work is not focusing on the characterization of these molecules in multiple biological processes, as these can regulate the physiological biology of the cell but also affect numerous pathological processes including developmental disorders. Moreover, lncRNAs are also emerging as regulatory molecules in neurodegenerative processes. These molecules also show great promise as therapeutic regulators, and there is thus a crucial need to dissect their full mechanism of action.

The main aim of this Special Issue is thus to publish innovative research and key advancements on lncRNA’s role in neurological disorders.

Dr. Federica Rey
Dr. Stephana Carelli
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • LncRNAs
  • neurodevelopment
  • neurodegeneration
  • epigenetics
  • non-coding RNAs
  • gene therapy

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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16 pages, 3457 KiB  
Article
Transcriptome-Wide 5-Methylcytosine Profiling of lncRNAs in the Mouse Cerebral Ischemia Model
by Chao Zhang, Junpeng Gao, Dan Xiong and Yan Zhao
Pharmaceuticals 2024, 17(3), 384; https://doi.org/10.3390/ph17030384 - 18 Mar 2024
Viewed by 1174
Abstract
An increasing body of research has demonstrated the significant role of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in the pathogenesis of stroke. They can actively contribute to the disease’s progression either by directly participating in its pathogenesis or by acting as mediators through competing endogenous [...] Read more.
An increasing body of research has demonstrated the significant role of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in the pathogenesis of stroke. They can actively contribute to the disease’s progression either by directly participating in its pathogenesis or by acting as mediators through competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA) mechanisms. Concurrently, epigenetics plays a pivotal role in the pathological mechanisms underlying stroke. Epigenetic factors serve as valuable markers for disease progression, diagnostic biomarkers, and novel therapeutic targets. One of the most prevalent epigenetic modifications is 5-methylcytosine (m5C). However, the specific profiles of 5-methylcytosine in lncRNAs associated with stroke remain to be solved. Within the scope of this research, we performed a thorough transcriptome-wide analysis of m5C methylation within lncRNAs by methylated RNA immunoprecipitation sequencing (MeRIP-Seq), within a mouse stroke model induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion. Our findings reveal substantial disparities in both the quantity and distribution of m5C within the mouse stroke model compared to normal mice. This suggests a potential linkage between stroke and lncRNA m5C modifications, offering valuable insights into the mechanisms of stroke pathogenesis and the development of new drug targets. Full article
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Review

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14 pages, 1202 KiB  
Review
Study of lncRNAs in Pediatric Neurological Diseases: Methods, Analysis of the State-of-Art and Possible Therapeutic Implications
by Cecilia Pandini, Federica Rey, Cristina Cereda, Stephana Carelli and Paolo Gandellini
Pharmaceuticals 2023, 16(11), 1616; https://doi.org/10.3390/ph16111616 - 16 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 852
Abstract
Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as crucial regulators in various cellular processes, and their roles in pediatric neurological diseases are increasingly being explored. This review provides an overview of lncRNA implications in the central nervous system, both in its physiological state and [...] Read more.
Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as crucial regulators in various cellular processes, and their roles in pediatric neurological diseases are increasingly being explored. This review provides an overview of lncRNA implications in the central nervous system, both in its physiological state and when a pathological condition is present. We describe the role of lncRNAs in neural development, highlighting their significance in processes such as neural stem cell proliferation, differentiation, and synaptogenesis. Dysregulation of specific lncRNAs is associated with multiple pediatric neurological diseases, such as neurodevelopmental or neurodegenerative disorders and brain tumors. The collected evidence indicates that there is a need for further research to uncover the full spectrum of lncRNA involvement in pediatric neurological diseases and brain tumors. While challenges exist, ongoing advancements in technology and our understanding of lncRNA biology offer hope for future breakthroughs in the field of pediatric neurology, leveraging lncRNAs as potential therapeutic targets and biomarkers. Full article
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