Nutritional Approaches for Digestive Disorders and Gastrointestinal Symptoms

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Clinical Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 July 2024 | Viewed by 15453

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Division of Digestive Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 100 UCLA Medical Plaza, Suite 345, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
Interests: nutrition; inflammatory bowel diseases; gastrointestinal nutrition
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are organizing a Special Issue focusing on nutritional approaches for the management of digestive disorders and gastrointestinal symptoms.

It is well established that digestive diseases and nutrition are intricately linked, whilst also exerting bidirectional effects. On the one hand, digestive disorders can lead to unhealthy dietary patterns and malnutrition. On the other hand, dietary interventions and nutrition support can have therapeutic effects on gastrointestinal diseases and their symptoms and complications.

In this Special Issue, we invite researchers to submit papers on this topic. We welcome original research articles, animal and clinical studies, as well as review articles.

Dr. Berkeley N. Limketkai
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • gastrointestinal symptoms
  • digestive diseases
  • diet
  • nutrition
  • nutrition support
  • parenteral nutrition
  • enteral nutrition

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Review

22 pages, 401 KiB  
Review
Prebiotics and Probiotics for Gastrointestinal Disorders
by Sameeha Rau, Andrew Gregg, Shelby Yaceczko and Berkeley Limketkai
Nutrients 2024, 16(6), 778; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16060778 - 09 Mar 2024
Viewed by 2090
Abstract
The complex role of the gut microbiome in the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal (GI) disorders is an emerging area of research, and there is considerable interest in understanding how diet can alter the composition and function of the microbiome. Prebiotics and probiotics have been [...] Read more.
The complex role of the gut microbiome in the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal (GI) disorders is an emerging area of research, and there is considerable interest in understanding how diet can alter the composition and function of the microbiome. Prebiotics and probiotics have been shown to beneficially modulate the gut microbiome, which underlies their potential for benefit in GI conditions. Formulating specific recommendations for the public regarding these dietary supplements has been difficult due to the significant heterogeneity between strains, doses, and duration of treatment investigated across studies, as well as safety concerns with administering live organisms. This review aims to summarize the existing evidence for the use of prebiotics and probiotics in various GI disorders, paying special attention to strain-specific effects that emerged and any adverse effects noted. Full article
16 pages, 840 KiB  
Review
Implications of Protein and Sarcopenia in the Prognosis, Treatment, and Management of Metabolic Dysfunction-Associated Steatotic Liver Disease (MASLD)
by Avneet Singh, Adam Buckholz, Sonal Kumar and Carolyn Newberry
Nutrients 2024, 16(5), 658; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16050658 - 26 Feb 2024
Viewed by 809
Abstract
Metabolic Dysfunction-Associated Steatotic Liver Disease (MASLD) is a common cause of chronic liver disease globally, with prevalence rapidly increasing in parallel with rising rates of obesity and metabolic syndrome. MASLD is defined by the presence of excess fat in the liver, which may [...] Read more.
Metabolic Dysfunction-Associated Steatotic Liver Disease (MASLD) is a common cause of chronic liver disease globally, with prevalence rapidly increasing in parallel with rising rates of obesity and metabolic syndrome. MASLD is defined by the presence of excess fat in the liver, which may induce inflammatory changes and subsequent fibrosis in high-risk patients. Though MASLD occurs frequently, there is still no approved pharmacological treatment, and the mainstay of therapy remains lifestyle modification via dietary changes, enhancement of physical activity, and management of metabolic comorbidities. Most nutrition research and clinical guidance in this disease centers on the reduction in fructose and saturated fat in the diet, although the emerging literature suggests that protein supplementation is important and implicates muscle mass and sarcopenia in disease-related outcomes. This review will assess the current data on these topics, with the goal of defining best practices and identifying research gaps in care. Full article
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17 pages, 1092 KiB  
Review
Functional Food in Relation to Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD)
by Yedi Herdiana
Nutrients 2023, 15(16), 3583; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15163583 - 15 Aug 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 6715
Abstract
Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common esophageal disorder characterized by troublesome symptoms associated with increased esophageal acid exposure. The cornerstones of therapy in this regard include treatment with acid-suppressive agents, lifestyle modifications, and dietary therapy, although the latter has not been well [...] Read more.
Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common esophageal disorder characterized by troublesome symptoms associated with increased esophageal acid exposure. The cornerstones of therapy in this regard include treatment with acid-suppressive agents, lifestyle modifications, and dietary therapy, although the latter has not been well defined. As concerns regarding long-term proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use continue to be explored, patients and healthcare providers are becoming increasingly interested in the role of diet in disease management. However, dietary interventions lack evidence of the synthesis effect of functional foods. The following is a review of dietary therapy for GERD, emphasizing food components’ impact on GERD pathophysiology and management. Although the sequential dietary elimination of food groups is a common practice, the literature supports broader intervention, including reduced overall sugar intake, increased dietary fiber, and changes in overall eating practices. While the primary concern of food companies is to provide safe products, the caloric, nutritional, and functional composition of foods is also generating interest in the food industry due to consumers’ concerns. Full article
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20 pages, 812 KiB  
Review
Nutrition in Acute Pancreatitis: From the Old Paradigm to the New Evidence
by Sara Sofia De Lucia, Marcello Candelli, Giorgia Polito, Rossella Maresca, Teresa Mezza, Tommaso Schepis, Antonio Pellegrino, Lorenzo Zileri Dal Verme, Alberto Nicoletti, Francesco Franceschi, Antonio Gasbarrini and Enrico Celestino Nista
Nutrients 2023, 15(8), 1939; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15081939 - 18 Apr 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 5396
Abstract
The nutritional management of acute pancreatitis (AP) patients has widely changed over time. The “pancreatic rest” was the cornerstone of the old paradigm, and nutritional support was not even included in AP management. Traditional management of AP was based on intestinal rest, with [...] Read more.
The nutritional management of acute pancreatitis (AP) patients has widely changed over time. The “pancreatic rest” was the cornerstone of the old paradigm, and nutritional support was not even included in AP management. Traditional management of AP was based on intestinal rest, with or without complete parenteral feeding. Recently, evidence-based data underlined the superiority of early oral or enteral feeding with significantly decreased multiple-organ failure, systemic infections, surgery need, and mortality rate. Despite the current recommendations, experts still debate the best route for enteral nutritional support and the best enteral formula. The aim of this work is to collect and analyze evidence over the nutritional aspects of AP management to investigate its impact. Moreover, the role of immunonutrition and probiotics in modulating inflammatory response and gut dysbiosis during AP was extensively studied. However, we have no significant data for their use in clinical practice. This is the first work to move beyond the mere opposition between the old and the new paradigm, including an analysis of several topics still under debate in order to provide a comprehensive overview of nutritional management of AP. Full article
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