Special Issue "Gene, Diet, Inflammation and Gut Health"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutrigenetics and Nutrigenomics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 October 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Gerard E. Mullin
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Division of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 600 N Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA
Interests: nutrition; inflammatory bowel disease; digital health; technology; epidemiology
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Berkeley N. Limketkai
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Division of Digestive Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 100 UCLA Medical Plaza, Suite 345, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
Interests: nutrition; inflammatory bowel disease; digital health; technology; epidemiology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Emerging studies have revealed complex interactions involving human genetics, the diet, and gastrointestinal health. This interplay of factors has already been demonstrated in several conditions, such as irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, liver disease, and obesity. To highlight the importance of this area of research, Nutrients has planned a Special Issue titled “Gene, Diet, Inflammation and Gut Health”. This Special Issue focuses on original research and narrative reviews that relate to nutrigenetics and nutrigenomics and how they influence gut health. I am delighted to invite you to contribute an article to this Special Issue.

Dr. Gerard E. Mullin
Dr. Berkeley N. Limketkai
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • inflammation
  • therapeutic diets
  • nutrigenomics
  • inflammatory bowel disease
  • dietary supplements
  • gut microbiome

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Differences in Dietary Patterns of Adolescent Patients with IBD
Nutrients 2021, 13(9), 3119; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13093119 - 06 Sep 2021
Viewed by 585
Abstract
Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) includes Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). The prevalence of both in pediatric populations has been constantly increasing. This study aimed to analyze the diet of adolescent patients with IBD in comparison to healthy controls and the current [...] Read more.
Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) includes Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). The prevalence of both in pediatric populations has been constantly increasing. This study aimed to analyze the diet of adolescent patients with IBD in comparison to healthy controls and the current dietary standards for the Polish population to further their optimal supplementation regimen. The study group consisted of 53 patients (21 girls and 32 boys) with IBD (CD: n = 27; UC: n = 26) at a mean age of 15.4 ± 2.4 and 14.7 ± 2.2, years for girls and boys, respectively. The control group (CG) consisted of 20 patients, and 72 h of recall diaries on nutrition were collected. The nutritional data were analyzed in the Dieta 6D dietary program. When compared to Polish dietary standards, the largest differences girls with IBD and boys with IBD were found for the intake of energy (61.9 and 71.9%), iodine (61.9 and 62.6%), folates (76.2 and 87.5%), vitamin D (100 and 96.9%), potassium (61.9 and 59.4%), and calcium (85.7 and 93.8%). The overconsumption of saturated fatty acids (SFA) (61.9 and 56.3%) and sodium (76.2 and 90.6%) in girls and boys, respectively, was noted. In relation to girls with CG, girls with IBD showed a significantly higher intake of energy (1751. 3 vs. 1558.6 p = 0.0224), total protein (71.3 vs. 56.2 p = 0.0217), animal protein (47.8 vs. 34.5 p = 0.0183), total carbohydrates (237.3 vs. 196.1 p = 0.0442), and assimilable carbohydrates (219.8 vs. 180.5 p = 0.7921). Boys in the CG consumed significantly more calcium (851.8 vs. 432 p = 0.0006), phosphorus (1024.3 vs. 1357.5 p = 0.0431), lactose (11.6 vs. 6.1 p = 0.0016), and riboflavin (1.7 vs. 1.3 p = 0.0123) compared to boys with IBD. Dietician care should therefore be mandatorily provided alongside outpatient care. Based on our results, we suggest that supplementation with the selected components be considered. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gene, Diet, Inflammation and Gut Health)
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