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Special Issue "National Nutrition and Health Surveys, a Platform for Advancing Research, Policy, and Practice"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 April 2019)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Hassan Vatanparast

College of Pharmacy and Nutrition, School of Public Health, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 2Z4, Canada
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 306-966-8866
Interests: nutritional epidemiology, vitamin D, calcium, national nutrition surveys, osteoporosis, bone health, CVD

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Most countries, nowadays, have periodic national nutrition and health surveys that allow the monitoring bodies and researchers to evaluate the nutritional health of their populations and the efficacy of relevant policies and practices, as well as identifying the needs for further interventions. The availability of such important nationally representative data, as well as the methodological advances in the field of nutritional epidemiology, has created a valuable platform for further research and capacity building in the field. This Special Issue of Nutrients entitled “National Nutrition and Health Surveys, a Platform for Advancing Research, Policy, and Practice” is dedicated to papers used national survey data to address nutrition and health-related research questions.

Some relevant topics may include, but are not limited to:

  1. Evaluating prevalence of inadequacy in nutrient intakes
  2. Dietary patterns in association with health and disease
  3. Use of machine learning techniques in the evaluation of nutritional health
  4. Identifying at-risk population for specific nutrient efficiencies
  5. The efficacy of fortification policies and dietary intake recommendations

Dr. Hassan Vatanparast
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Consumption of Yogurt in Canada and Its Contribution to Nutrient Intake and Diet Quality Among Canadians
Nutrients 2019, 11(6), 1203; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11061203
Received: 4 April 2019 / Revised: 23 May 2019 / Accepted: 24 May 2019 / Published: 28 May 2019
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Abstract
The current study utilizes a nationally representative nutrition survey data (Canadian Community Health Survey 2015, nutrition component, n = 20,487) in order to evaluate patterns of yogurt consumption among Canadians. Overall, 20% of Canadians have reportedly consumed yogurt on a given day in [...] Read more.
The current study utilizes a nationally representative nutrition survey data (Canadian Community Health Survey 2015, nutrition component, n = 20,487) in order to evaluate patterns of yogurt consumption among Canadians. Overall, 20% of Canadians have reportedly consumed yogurt on a given day in 2015. Higher prevalence of yogurt consumption was noted among children aged 2–5 years old (47%) when compared to adults aged 19–54 years (18%). When the prevalence of yogurt consumption at the regional level in Canada was assessed, Quebec had the most consumers of yogurt (25%) compared to other regions, namely the Atlantic (19%), Ontario (18%), Prairies (19%) and British Columbia (20%). Yogurt consumers reported consuming higher daily intakes of several key nutrients including carbohydrates, fibre, riboflavin, vitamin C, folate, vitamin D, potassium, iron, magnesium, and calcium when compared to yogurt non-consumers. Additionally, the diet quality, measured using NRF 9.3 scoring method, was higher among yogurt consumers compared to non-consumers. Nearly 36% of Canadians who meet the dietary guidelines for milk and alternative servings from the Food Guide Canada (2007) reported consuming yogurt. Lastly, no significant difference in BMI was noted among yogurt consumers and non-consumers. Overall, yogurt consumers had a higher intake of key nutrients and had a better diet quality. Full article
Open AccessArticle
Snack Consumption Patterns among Canadians
Nutrients 2019, 11(5), 1152; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11051152
Received: 9 April 2019 / Revised: 17 May 2019 / Accepted: 21 May 2019 / Published: 23 May 2019
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Abstract
The snacking prevalence, frequency of daily snack consumption, and the contribution of snacks to daily energy intake have substantially increased globally. The aim of this study was to examine the patterns of snack consumption among a representative sample of Canadians aged 2 and [...] Read more.
The snacking prevalence, frequency of daily snack consumption, and the contribution of snacks to daily energy intake have substantially increased globally. The aim of this study was to examine the patterns of snack consumption among a representative sample of Canadians aged 2 and older. Nationally representative dietary data from the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) conducted in 2015 (n = 19,677 participants aged ≥2 years) were used to describe snacking patterns. In all, 80.4% of Canadians reported consuming at least one snack per day, which varied between different age groups from 77.0% (≥55 years) to 96.4% (2–5 years). About 37% of snack consumers reported only one snack episode per day but nearly 10% reported four or more episodes of snacking. Snacking contributed to nearly 23% of total daily energy intake in Canadians, which was highest among younger children (27%) and lowest among older adults (20.8%). There were no significant differences in obesity measures comparing snack consumers and non-consumers in children and adults. Snacking considerably contributes to total nutrient and energy intake of Canadians. Promoting nutrient-dense snacks provides an opportunity to improve overall diet quality. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Consumption of Ready-to-Eat Cereal in Canada and Its Contribution to Nutrient Intake and Nutrient Density among Canadians
Nutrients 2019, 11(5), 1009; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11051009
Received: 28 March 2019 / Revised: 29 April 2019 / Accepted: 30 April 2019 / Published: 3 May 2019
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Abstract
In recent years, ready-to-eat cereal (RTEC) has become a common breakfast option in Canada and worldwide. This study used the nationally representative cross-sectional data from the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) 2015-Nutrition to determine patterns of RTEC consumption in Canada and the contribution [...] Read more.
In recent years, ready-to-eat cereal (RTEC) has become a common breakfast option in Canada and worldwide. This study used the nationally representative cross-sectional data from the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) 2015-Nutrition to determine patterns of RTEC consumption in Canada and the contribution to nutrient intake among Canadians who were ≥2 years, of whom 22 ± 0.6% consumed RTEC on any given day. The prevalence of RTEC consumption was highest in children aged two to 12 years (37.6 ± 1.2%), followed by adolescents aged 13 to 18 years (28.8 ± 1.4%), and then by adults ≥19 years (18.9 ± 0.6%). RTEC consumers had higher intakes of “nutrients to encourage” compared to the RTEC non-consumers. More than 15% of the daily intake of some nutrients, such as folic acid, iron, thiamin, and vitamin B6, were contributed by RTEC. It was noted that nearly 66% of milk consumption was co-consumed with RTEC among RTEC consumers. The nutrient density of the diet, as defined by Nutrient-Rich Food Index (NRF 9.3), was significantly higher among RTEC consumers compared to non-consumers. RTEC consumption was not associated with overweight/obesity. RTEC consumption considerably contributed to the intake of some key nutrients among all age groups in Canada. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Consumption Patterns of Grain-Based Foods among Adults in Canada: Evidence from Canadian Community Health Survey—Nutrition 2015
Nutrients 2019, 11(4), 784; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11040784
Received: 20 February 2019 / Revised: 19 March 2019 / Accepted: 1 April 2019 / Published: 4 April 2019
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Abstract
In this study, we used the Canadian Community Health Survey-Nutrition (CCHS) 2015 data to examine the consumption patterns of grain-based foods (GBFs) for Canadian adults. We used a k-mean cluster analysis based on the contribution of 21 grain-based foods to total energy [...] Read more.
In this study, we used the Canadian Community Health Survey-Nutrition (CCHS) 2015 data to examine the consumption patterns of grain-based foods (GBFs) for Canadian adults. We used a k-mean cluster analysis based on the contribution of 21 grain-based foods to total energy intake of adults in Canada to find the dietary patterns of GBFs. Cluster analyses rendered seven dietary patterns including: ‘other bread’, ‘cake and cookies’, ‘pasta’, ‘rice’, ‘mixed’, ‘white bread’, and finally ‘whole wheat and whole-grain bread’. ‘No grain’ and ‘rice’ consumers had lower intakes of dietary fibre, folate, iron and calcium, which are the nutrients of public health concern in Canada. Adults consuming a ‘mixed grain’ dietary pattern had a greater daily intake of calcium, potassium, magnesium, riboflavin, and vitamin B6 than those in the ‘no grain’ dietary pattern. We also observed that a considerable proportion of individuals clustered in the ‘rice’ group are immigrants and belong to households with lower income levels. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Consumption Patterns of Grain-Based Foods among Children and Adolescents in Canada: Evidence from Canadian Community Health Survey-Nutrition 2015
Nutrients 2019, 11(3), 623; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11030623
Received: 1 February 2019 / Revised: 5 March 2019 / Accepted: 5 March 2019 / Published: 14 March 2019
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Abstract
The current analyses used data from the Canadian Community Health Survey-Nutrition 2015 to investigate grain-based food (GBF) dietary patterns of consumptions among 6,400,000 Canadian children and adolescents 2 to 18 years old. Nutrient intakes, socioeconomic differences, body mass index (BMI) z-scores, and [...] Read more.
The current analyses used data from the Canadian Community Health Survey-Nutrition 2015 to investigate grain-based food (GBF) dietary patterns of consumptions among 6,400,000 Canadian children and adolescents 2 to 18 years old. Nutrient intakes, socioeconomic differences, body mass index (BMI) z-scores, and intakes of several food groups were examined across the identified grain patterns of consumption. We employed k-mean cluster analysis to identify the consumption patterns of grain products. Based on the contributions of 21 grain food groups to the total energy intake of each individual, seven GBF consumption patterns were identified including other bread; salty snacks; pasta; rice; cakes and cookies; white bread; and mixed grains. Individuals having less than one serving of grain products were also separately categorized as no-grain consumers. Mean energy intake (kcal/day) was lowest for the “no-grain” consumers and greatest in children/adolescents consuming a “salty snacks” pattern when all GBF patterns were compared. Children and adolescents with “no-grain” and “rice” GBF consumption patterns had significantly lower intakes of several nutrients including dietary fiber, folate, magnesium, calcium, iron, zinc, thiamin, niacin, and riboflavin. No associations were observed with any of the identified GBF patterns and BMI z-scores. In addition, the socioeconomic status (SES) indicators such as household incomes and immigration status of participants were shown to be significantly different across the identified clusters. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Clustering of Metabolic Risk Components and Associated Lifestyle Factors: A Nationwide Adolescent Study in Taiwan
Nutrients 2019, 11(3), 584; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11030584
Received: 14 January 2019 / Revised: 22 February 2019 / Accepted: 1 March 2019 / Published: 9 March 2019
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (713 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Clustering of metabolic syndrome (MetS) risk components in childhood has been linked to a higher risk of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases in adulthood. By using data from the 2010–2011 Nutrition and Health Survey in Taiwan, this study investigated epidemic patterns and correlates for [...] Read more.
Clustering of metabolic syndrome (MetS) risk components in childhood has been linked to a higher risk of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases in adulthood. By using data from the 2010–2011 Nutrition and Health Survey in Taiwan, this study investigated epidemic patterns and correlates for the clustering of MetS risk components. A total of 1920 adolescents aged 12–18 years were included in this study. The MetS diagnostic criteria defined by the Taiwan Pediatric Association (TPA) and International Diabetes Federation (IDF) for adolescents and the criteria defined by the Joint Interim Statement for adults (JIS-Adult) were used to evaluate MetS and its abnormal components. The prevalence of TPA-, IDF-, and JIS-Adult-defined MetS was 4.1%, 3.0%, and 4.0%, with 22.1%, 19.3%, and 17.7%–18.1% of adolescents having high fasting glucose, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and central obesity, respectively. A 0.4-to-0.5-fold decreased risk of having ≥2 MetS abnormal components was detected among adolescents who consumed ≥1 serving/week of dairy products and fresh fruits. Boys who consumed ≥7 drinks/week of soda and girls who consumed ≥7 drinks/week of tea had a 4.6- and 5.2-fold risk of MetS, respectively. In conclusion, our findings revealed significant dimensions of adolescent MetS, including detecting population-specific prevalent patterns for MetS risk components and their clustering, and emphasized on health promotion activities that reduce sugar-sweetened beverage intake. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Differences in the Quantity and Types of Foods and Beverages Consumed by Canadians between 2004 and 2015
Nutrients 2019, 11(3), 526; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11030526
Received: 10 January 2019 / Revised: 13 February 2019 / Accepted: 15 February 2019 / Published: 28 February 2019
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Abstract
This study examined differences in food and beverage intake estimated from nationally representative surveys of Canadians in 2004 and 2015 collected through the Canadian Community Health Surveys. Differences in mean daily energy intake and amounts of food consumed were compared between 2004 and [...] Read more.
This study examined differences in food and beverage intake estimated from nationally representative surveys of Canadians in 2004 and 2015 collected through the Canadian Community Health Surveys. Differences in mean daily energy intake and amounts of food consumed were compared between 2004 and 2015 and across age groups for all energy reporters (aged 2 years+) and among only plausible energy reporters. From 2004 to 2015, mean energy intake decreased by 228 kcal/day (all energy reporters) and 74 kcal/day (plausible energy reporters). Canadians reported consuming more daily servings of meat and alternatives but fewer servings of vegetables and fruit and milk and alternatives in 2015 compared to 2004. Analyses of food subgroups revealed that Canadians reported consuming more daily servings of dark green and orange vegetables, dairy products, legumes, nuts and seeds, and eggs but fewer servings of potatoes, other vegetables, fruit juices, fluid milk, and sugar-sweetened beverages in 2015 compared to 2004. While some aspects of the Canadian diet have improved, daily mean intake of other nutritious foods either stagnated or worsened over time. Continued attention is needed to improve population-level intakes of vegetables, fruit, whole grains, and protein foods such as legumes, nuts, seeds, and lower fat dairy products. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Brazilian Foodborne Disease National Survey: Evaluating the Landscape after 11 Years of Implementation to Advance Research, Policy, and Practice in Public Health
Nutrients 2019, 11(1), 40; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11010040
Received: 5 November 2018 / Revised: 7 December 2018 / Accepted: 17 December 2018 / Published: 25 December 2018
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (1802 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The poor control of public and private agencies regarding the quality of foods offered to populations has a significant impact on the occurrence of foodborne diseases. Precise information about foodborne diseases (FBD) can adequately inform policy-makers and help to allocate appropriate resources for [...] Read more.
The poor control of public and private agencies regarding the quality of foods offered to populations has a significant impact on the occurrence of foodborne diseases. Precise information about foodborne diseases (FBD) can adequately inform policy-makers and help to allocate appropriate resources for the control of food safety. This study aimed to evaluate the Brazilian foodborne disease landscape after 11 years of implementation of the Epidemiological Surveillance System of Foodborne Diseases. The study analyzed secondary data from the National System of Injuries and Notifications (SINAN-NET), available from the Health Department. We evaluated the characteristics of FBD, such as the food involved, the location of ingestion, the total time to the outcome investigation, the microorganism involved and deaths. We also calculated the global incidence, mortality and lethality rates of the country. There were 7630 FBD outbreaks in the National Epidemiological Surveillance System of Foodborne Diseases (VE-DTA). Of the registered reports, a total of 134,046 individuals were sick with FBD; 19,394 were hospitalized, and there were 127 registered deaths. We found a coefficient of incidence of FBD of 67.57 per 100,000 inhabitants; a mortality coefficient of 0.06 per 100,000 inhabitants and lethality of 0.09% over the 11 years investigated. Data are probably underreported since the VE-DTA system lacks completeness, and because FBD symptoms are mostly mild, a large part of the population does not seek care from health services. Full article
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