nutrients-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

National Nutrition and Health Surveys, a Platform for Advancing Research, Policy, and Practice

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 April 2019) | Viewed by 75852

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Pharmacy and Nutrition, School of Public Health, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 2Z4, Canada
Interests: nutritional epidemiology; vitamin D; calcium; national nutrition surveys; osteoporosis; bone health; CVD
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Most countries, nowadays, have periodic national nutrition and health surveys that allow the monitoring bodies and researchers to evaluate the nutritional health of their populations and the efficacy of relevant policies and practices, as well as identifying the needs for further interventions. The availability of such important nationally representative data, as well as the methodological advances in the field of nutritional epidemiology, has created a valuable platform for further research and capacity building in the field. This Special Issue of Nutrients entitled “National Nutrition and Health Surveys, a Platform for Advancing Research, Policy, and Practice” is dedicated to papers used national survey data to address nutrition and health-related research questions.

Some relevant topics may include, but are not limited to:

  1. Evaluating prevalence of inadequacy in nutrient intakes
  2. Dietary patterns in association with health and disease
  3. Use of machine learning techniques in the evaluation of nutritional health
  4. Identifying at-risk population for specific nutrient efficiencies
  5. The efficacy of fortification policies and dietary intake recommendations

Dr. Hassan Vatanparast
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (15 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

19 pages, 818 KiB  
Article
Association between Ready-to-Eat Cereal Consumption and Nutrient Intake, Nutritional Adequacy, and Diet Quality among Infants, Toddlers, and Children in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2015–2016
by Jessica D. Smith, Yong Zhu, Vipra Vanage, Neha Jain, Norton Holschuh and Anne Hermetet Agler
Nutrients 2019, 11(9), 1989; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11091989 - 23 Aug 2019
Cited by 19 | Viewed by 5291
Abstract
Ready-to-eat (RTE) cereal is a popular food among children. However, there are no recent data on the associations between RTE cereal consumption and dietary outcomes in the U.S. Therefore, we sought to investigate how RTE cereal was associated with nutrient and food group [...] Read more.
Ready-to-eat (RTE) cereal is a popular food among children. However, there are no recent data on the associations between RTE cereal consumption and dietary outcomes in the U.S. Therefore, we sought to investigate how RTE cereal was associated with nutrient and food group intakes and overall dietary quality among children aged 0.5 to 17 years using the latest data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES 2015–2016). Thirty-six percent of children reported consuming RTE cereal. RTE cereal eaters consumed the same number of calories as non-eaters but had higher intakes of total carbohydrates, total sugar, fiber, calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, zinc, vitamin A, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B6, folate, vitamin B12, and vitamin D, as well as lower intakes of total fat and saturated fat (p ≤ 0.0007). We also found that children who consumed RTE cereal had 29% higher total dairy intake (p < 0.0001) and 61% higher whole grain intake (p < 0.0001). Lastly, children who ate RTE cereal had higher diet quality than the children that did not eat RTE cereal, as shown by Healthy Eating Index 2015 total score (52.6 versus 47.7, p < 0.0001). Therefore, consumption of whole-grain fortified RTE cereals should be encouraged as part of healthy dietary patterns for children. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 596 KiB  
Article
Association between Grain Intake, Nutrient Intake, and Diet Quality of Canadians: Evidence from the Canadian Community Health Survey–Nutrition 2015
by Seyed H Hosseini, Julie M Jones and Hassan Vatanparast
Nutrients 2019, 11(8), 1937; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11081937 - 17 Aug 2019
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 4937
Abstract
The new Canada’s Food Guide (CFG) recommends whole grains foods as the primary choice of grain products in the daily diet. This study examined whether higher shares of whole-grain consumption, beyond the recommended levels (i.e., above half) of the daily grain intake, are [...] Read more.
The new Canada’s Food Guide (CFG) recommends whole grains foods as the primary choice of grain products in the daily diet. This study examined whether higher shares of whole-grain consumption, beyond the recommended levels (i.e., above half) of the daily grain intake, are linked with optimal diet quality and intakes of some key nutrients, for both children and adolescents and adults in Canada. To meet the objective of this study, we used the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS)–Nutrition 2015, which is a nationally representative data. We employed the propensity score matching (PSM) method in this study. PSM estimates the exposure effect when a set of individuals are exposed to a specific treatment (food group intake in this study) in a non-experimental setting. The results of our analyses implied that a high consumption of whole grains is associated with a good diet quality. However, after a certain level of whole-grain consumption, no significant differences can be observed in diet quality scores of children and adolescents and adults. Moreover, it was observed that the proportion of obese and overweight individuals was significantly lower among adults that had balanced intakes of whole and non-whole grains. The results of logistic regression analyses also showed the probability of being obese and overweight is significantly lower in the case of adults with balanced intakes of grains. However, no significant differences were observed in the prevalence of obesity and overweight across whole grains consumption patterns for children and adolescents. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

12 pages, 594 KiB  
Article
Early Experience Analyzing Dietary Intake Data from the Canadian Community Health Survey—Nutrition Using the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Method
by Karelyn A. Davis, Alejandro Gonzalez, Lidia Loukine, Cunye Qiao, Alireza Sadeghpour, Michel Vigneault, Kuan Chiao Wang and Dominique Ibañez
Nutrients 2019, 11(8), 1908; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11081908 - 15 Aug 2019
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 3770
Abstract
Background: One of the underpinning elements to support evidence-based decision-making in food and nutrition is the usual dietary intake of a population. It represents the long-run average consumption of a particular dietary component (i.e., food or nutrient). Variations in individual eating habits are [...] Read more.
Background: One of the underpinning elements to support evidence-based decision-making in food and nutrition is the usual dietary intake of a population. It represents the long-run average consumption of a particular dietary component (i.e., food or nutrient). Variations in individual eating habits are observed from day-to-day and between individuals. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) method uses statistical modeling to account for these variations in estimation of usual intakes. This method was originally developed for nutrition survey data in the United States. The main objective of this study was to apply the NCI method in the analysis of Canadian nutrition surveys. Methods: Data from two surveys, the 2004 and 2015 Canadian Community Health Survey—Nutrition were used to estimate usual dietary intake distributions from food sources using the NCI method. The effect of different statistical considerations such as choice of the model, covariates, stratification compared to pooling, and exclusion of outliers were assessed, along with the computational time to convergence. Results: A flowchart to aid in model selection was developed. Different covariates (e.g., age/sex groups, cycle, weekday/weekend of the recall) were used to adjust the estimates of usual intakes. Moreover, larger differences in the ratio of within to between variation for a stratified analysis or a pooled analysis resulted in noticeable differences, particularly in the tails of the distribution of usual intake estimates. Outliers were subsequently removed when the ratio was larger than 10. For an individual age/sex group, the NCI method took 1 h–5 h to obtain results depending on the dietary component. Conclusion: Early experience in using the NCI method with Canadian nutrition surveys data led to the development of a flowchart to facilitate the choice of the NCI model to use. The ability of the NCI method to include covariates permits comparisons between both 2004 and 2015. This study shows that the improper application of pooling and stratification as well as the outlier detection can lead to biased results. This early experience can provide guidance to other researchers and ensures consistency in the analysis of usual dietary intake in the Canadian context. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

20 pages, 285 KiB  
Article
Differences in Dietary Intakes among Lebanese Adults over a Decade: Results from Two National Surveys 1997–2008/2009
by Lara Nasreddine, Jennifer J. Ayoub, Fatima Hachem, Jiana Tabbara, Abla M. Sibai, Nahla Hwalla and Farah Naja
Nutrients 2019, 11(8), 1738; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11081738 - 27 Jul 2019
Cited by 25 | Viewed by 3764
Abstract
Amidst the ongoing societal and economic shifts in the Eastern Mediterranean region (EMR), this study aims at investigating temporal trends in food consumption and nutrient intakes among Lebanese adults, by age and sex. Data were derived from two national cross-sectional surveys conducted in [...] Read more.
Amidst the ongoing societal and economic shifts in the Eastern Mediterranean region (EMR), this study aims at investigating temporal trends in food consumption and nutrient intakes among Lebanese adults, by age and sex. Data were derived from two national cross-sectional surveys conducted in Lebanon during two time periods (1997; 2008/2009). In both surveys, dietary assessment was based on 24-h recalls. The results, expressed as % energy intake (%EI), revealed a significant decrease (p < 0.001) in the consumption of bread, fruits, fresh fruit juices, milk and eggs, whereas the consumption of added fats and oils, poultry, cereals and cereal-based products, chips and salty crackers, sweetened milk and hot beverages increased over time (p < 0.001). A significant increase in dietary energy (kcal/day) and fat intake (%EI) was observed, coupled with decreases in carbohydrate intake (%EI) and dietary density of vitamin A and vitamin C (per 1000 kcal) (p < 0.001). These changes were noted in both genders and across age groups, albeit there were some disparities between groups. In conclusion, based on national nutrition surveys, this study is the first to characterize the nutrition transition in a middle-income country of the EMR, shedding light on priority areas for nutrition policies and interventions. Full article
13 pages, 872 KiB  
Article
The Mexican National Health and Nutrition Survey as a Basis for Public Policy Planning: Overweight and Obesity
by Teresa Shamah-Levy, Martín Romero-Martínez, Lucia Cuevas-Nasu, Ignacio Méndez Gómez-Humaran, Marco Antonio Avila-Arcos and Juan A. Rivera-Dommarco
Nutrients 2019, 11(8), 1727; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11081727 - 26 Jul 2019
Cited by 18 | Viewed by 6220
Abstract
Mexico has one of the highest overweight and obesity rates in the world. Our objective is to describe the tendency of overweight and obesity by sex, health service affiliation, and socioeconomic tertile (T1,2,3), and to give examples of public policies derived from the [...] Read more.
Mexico has one of the highest overweight and obesity rates in the world. Our objective is to describe the tendency of overweight and obesity by sex, health service affiliation, and socioeconomic tertile (T1,2,3), and to give examples of public policies derived from the results of the Mexican National Health and Nutrition Surveys (ENSANUT). Data come from the 2006, 2012, and 2016 ENSANUTs, which are probabilistic surveys that allow us to make inferences at the national level, on urban and rural strata and regions; their coverage includes all the population age groups. We assessed overweight and obesity (OW + O) in all population groups. The prevalence of OW + O in preschool children was lower in T1 in all the surveys, and shows an increase by year of survey, according to the health service affiliation. In school-age women, prevalence increased over the 10 years of evaluation, in spite of the high prevalence in both genders in T3. Adolescent behavior is similar and, in adults, the prevalence of OW + O shows an increase by year of survey, gender, and affiliation, with the differences not explained by socioeconomic tertile. In conclusion, the ENSANUT series represents a surveillance system that allow us to observe the changes in overweight and obesity prevalence over the time, showing a high prevalence of OW + O in the population, and has contributed to public policy enhancement. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

14 pages, 382 KiB  
Article
The Consumption of Nuts is Associated with Better Dietary and Lifestyle Patterns in Polish Adults: Results of WOBASZ and WOBASZ II Surveys
by Anna M. Witkowska, Anna Waśkiewicz, Małgorzata E. Zujko, Danuta Szcześniewska, Witold Śmigielski, Urszula Stepaniak, Andrzej Pająk and Wojciech Drygas
Nutrients 2019, 11(6), 1410; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11061410 - 22 Jun 2019
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 4239
Abstract
In recent years, the concept of the health benefits of synergistic dietary patterns as opposed to individual foods or food constituents has been developed. The aim of this study was to determine whether nut consumption is associated with healthier nutrition and lifestyle. The [...] Read more.
In recent years, the concept of the health benefits of synergistic dietary patterns as opposed to individual foods or food constituents has been developed. The aim of this study was to determine whether nut consumption is associated with healthier nutrition and lifestyle. The research was based on complete data obtained during two Polish National Multi-Centre Health Examination Surveys—WOBASZ (2003–2005) and WOBASZ II (2013–2014). Of the 12,946 participants who completed dietary assessments, 299 subjects reported consuming any quantity of whole nuts. A control group of 1184 non-nut consumers from both surveys was randomly selected for the study, with age, gender, study (WOBASZ, WOBASZ II), educational level, and season-related interactions taken into account. In this study, nut consumption was associated with favorable food and lifestyle choices, excluding smoking. Better dietary quality consisted of having a higher Healthy Diet Indicator score, an increased intake of polyphenols and antioxidants, lower intake of red meat, but higher of poultry and fruit, more frequent consumption of antiatherogenic food products, and less frequent consumption of processed meats. There was also greater interest in special diets, such as weight-loss diet. In addition, nut eaters were more physically active in their leisure time. While limited by 24-h recall of nut intake and possible misclassification of nut/non-nut consumer status, this research supports the synergistic health-promoting attitudes of those who were classified as nut consumers. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 2993 KiB  
Article
Drink Choice is Important: Beverages Make a Substantial Contribution to Energy, Sugar, Calcium and Vitamin C Intake among Australians
by Malcolm D. Riley, Gilly A. Hendrie and Danielle L. Baird
Nutrients 2019, 11(6), 1389; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11061389 - 20 Jun 2019
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 5207
Abstract
It is important to understand the role of beverages in population dietary intake in order to give relevant advice. Population estimates were derived from one-day food recall dietary data from 12,153 participants in the 2011–2012 Australian National Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey. Almost [...] Read more.
It is important to understand the role of beverages in population dietary intake in order to give relevant advice. Population estimates were derived from one-day food recall dietary data from 12,153 participants in the 2011–2012 Australian National Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey. Almost all Australians (99.9%) consumed at least one beverage on the day of the survey, accounting for 16.6% of the total energy intake for adults (aged 19 years and over) and 13.0% for children (aged 2–18 years). Similarly, beverages contributed 26–29% to calcium intake, 22–28% to vitamin C intake, and 35–36% to sugar intake. Water was consumed on the day of the survey by 84.1% of Australian adults and 90.5% of children. For adults, the greatest beverage contributors to total energy intake were alcoholic drinks (5.6%), coffee (3.1%), and soft drinks (1.9%), and for children, plain milk (3.1%), flavoured milk (2.8%), and fruit juice (2.6%). Coffee (10.6%) made the greatest contribution to calcium intake for adults; and plain milk (9.9%) and flavoured milk (7.6%) for children. The greatest contributors to vitamin C intake were fruit juice (13.4%) and alcoholic drinks (6.1%) for adults; and fruit juice (23.4%) for children. For total sugar intake, soft drinks (8.0%), coffee (8.4%), and fruit juice (5.9%) made the highest contribution for adults; and fruit juice (9.8%) and soft drinks (8.7%) for children. The type and amount of beverage consumption has considerable relevance to dietary quality for Australians. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

13 pages, 260 KiB  
Article
Consumption of Yogurt in Canada and Its Contribution to Nutrient Intake and Diet Quality Among Canadians
by Hassan Vatanparast, Naorin Islam, Rashmi Prakash Patil, Arash Shamloo, Pardis Keshavarz, Jessica Smith and Susan Whiting
Nutrients 2019, 11(6), 1203; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11061203 - 28 May 2019
Cited by 18 | Viewed by 4076
Abstract
The current study utilizes a nationally representative nutrition survey data (Canadian Community Health Survey 2015, nutrition component, n = 20,487) in order to evaluate patterns of yogurt consumption among Canadians. Overall, 20% of Canadians have reportedly consumed yogurt on a given day in [...] Read more.
The current study utilizes a nationally representative nutrition survey data (Canadian Community Health Survey 2015, nutrition component, n = 20,487) in order to evaluate patterns of yogurt consumption among Canadians. Overall, 20% of Canadians have reportedly consumed yogurt on a given day in 2015. Higher prevalence of yogurt consumption was noted among children aged 2–5 years old (47%) when compared to adults aged 19–54 years (18%). When the prevalence of yogurt consumption at the regional level in Canada was assessed, Quebec had the most consumers of yogurt (25%) compared to other regions, namely the Atlantic (19%), Ontario (18%), Prairies (19%) and British Columbia (20%). Yogurt consumers reported consuming higher daily intakes of several key nutrients including carbohydrates, fibre, riboflavin, vitamin C, folate, vitamin D, potassium, iron, magnesium, and calcium when compared to yogurt non-consumers. Additionally, the diet quality, measured using NRF 9.3 scoring method, was higher among yogurt consumers compared to non-consumers. Nearly 36% of Canadians who meet the dietary guidelines for milk and alternative servings from the Food Guide Canada (2007) reported consuming yogurt. Lastly, no significant difference in BMI was noted among yogurt consumers and non-consumers. Overall, yogurt consumers had a higher intake of key nutrients and had a better diet quality. Full article
12 pages, 531 KiB  
Article
Snack Consumption Patterns among Canadians
by Hassan Vatanparast, Naorin Islam, Rashmi Prakash Patil, Mojtaba Shafiee, Jessica Smith and Susan Whiting
Nutrients 2019, 11(5), 1152; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11051152 - 23 May 2019
Cited by 42 | Viewed by 6760
Abstract
The snacking prevalence, frequency of daily snack consumption, and the contribution of snacks to daily energy intake have substantially increased globally. The aim of this study was to examine the patterns of snack consumption among a representative sample of Canadians aged 2 and [...] Read more.
The snacking prevalence, frequency of daily snack consumption, and the contribution of snacks to daily energy intake have substantially increased globally. The aim of this study was to examine the patterns of snack consumption among a representative sample of Canadians aged 2 and older. Nationally representative dietary data from the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) conducted in 2015 (n = 19,677 participants aged ≥2 years) were used to describe snacking patterns. In all, 80.4% of Canadians reported consuming at least one snack per day, which varied between different age groups from 77.0% (≥55 years) to 96.4% (2–5 years). About 37% of snack consumers reported only one snack episode per day but nearly 10% reported four or more episodes of snacking. Snacking contributed to nearly 23% of total daily energy intake in Canadians, which was highest among younger children (27%) and lowest among older adults (20.8%). There were no significant differences in obesity measures comparing snack consumers and non-consumers in children and adults. Snacking considerably contributes to total nutrient and energy intake of Canadians. Promoting nutrient-dense snacks provides an opportunity to improve overall diet quality. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

19 pages, 823 KiB  
Article
Consumption of Ready-to-Eat Cereal in Canada and Its Contribution to Nutrient Intake and Nutrient Density among Canadians
by Hassan Vatanparast, Naorin Islam, Rashmi Prakash Patil, Arash Shamloo, Pardis Keshavarz, Jessica Smith, Luan Manh Chu and Susan Whiting
Nutrients 2019, 11(5), 1009; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11051009 - 3 May 2019
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 4945
Abstract
In recent years, ready-to-eat cereal (RTEC) has become a common breakfast option in Canada and worldwide. This study used the nationally representative cross-sectional data from the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) 2015-Nutrition to determine patterns of RTEC consumption in Canada and the contribution [...] Read more.
In recent years, ready-to-eat cereal (RTEC) has become a common breakfast option in Canada and worldwide. This study used the nationally representative cross-sectional data from the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) 2015-Nutrition to determine patterns of RTEC consumption in Canada and the contribution to nutrient intake among Canadians who were ≥2 years, of whom 22 ± 0.6% consumed RTEC on any given day. The prevalence of RTEC consumption was highest in children aged two to 12 years (37.6 ± 1.2%), followed by adolescents aged 13 to 18 years (28.8 ± 1.4%), and then by adults ≥19 years (18.9 ± 0.6%). RTEC consumers had higher intakes of “nutrients to encourage” compared to the RTEC non-consumers. More than 15% of the daily intake of some nutrients, such as folic acid, iron, thiamin, and vitamin B6, were contributed by RTEC. It was noted that nearly 66% of milk consumption was co-consumed with RTEC among RTEC consumers. The nutrient density of the diet, as defined by Nutrient-Rich Food Index (NRF 9.3), was significantly higher among RTEC consumers compared to non-consumers. RTEC consumption was not associated with overweight/obesity. RTEC consumption considerably contributed to the intake of some key nutrients among all age groups in Canada. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

12 pages, 548 KiB  
Article
Consumption Patterns of Grain-Based Foods among Adults in Canada: Evidence from Canadian Community Health Survey—Nutrition 2015
by Seyed H. Hosseini, Yanni Papanikolaou, Naorin Islam, Patil Rashmi, Arash Shamloo and Hassan Vatanparast
Nutrients 2019, 11(4), 784; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11040784 - 4 Apr 2019
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 3920
Abstract
In this study, we used the Canadian Community Health Survey-Nutrition (CCHS) 2015 data to examine the consumption patterns of grain-based foods (GBFs) for Canadian adults. We used a k-mean cluster analysis based on the contribution of 21 grain-based foods to total energy [...] Read more.
In this study, we used the Canadian Community Health Survey-Nutrition (CCHS) 2015 data to examine the consumption patterns of grain-based foods (GBFs) for Canadian adults. We used a k-mean cluster analysis based on the contribution of 21 grain-based foods to total energy intake of adults in Canada to find the dietary patterns of GBFs. Cluster analyses rendered seven dietary patterns including: ‘other bread’, ‘cake and cookies’, ‘pasta’, ‘rice’, ‘mixed’, ‘white bread’, and finally ‘whole wheat and whole-grain bread’. ‘No grain’ and ‘rice’ consumers had lower intakes of dietary fibre, folate, iron and calcium, which are the nutrients of public health concern in Canada. Adults consuming a ‘mixed grain’ dietary pattern had a greater daily intake of calcium, potassium, magnesium, riboflavin, and vitamin B6 than those in the ‘no grain’ dietary pattern. We also observed that a considerable proportion of individuals clustered in the ‘rice’ group are immigrants and belong to households with lower income levels. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 532 KiB  
Article
Consumption Patterns of Grain-Based Foods among Children and Adolescents in Canada: Evidence from Canadian Community Health Survey-Nutrition 2015
by Syed Hamzeh Hosseini, Yanni Papanikolaou, Naorin Isalm, Patil Rashmi, Arash Shamloo and Hassan Vatanparast
Nutrients 2019, 11(3), 623; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11030623 - 14 Mar 2019
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 4087
Abstract
The current analyses used data from the Canadian Community Health Survey-Nutrition 2015 to investigate grain-based food (GBF) dietary patterns of consumptions among 6,400,000 Canadian children and adolescents 2 to 18 years old. Nutrient intakes, socioeconomic differences, body mass index (BMI) z-scores, and [...] Read more.
The current analyses used data from the Canadian Community Health Survey-Nutrition 2015 to investigate grain-based food (GBF) dietary patterns of consumptions among 6,400,000 Canadian children and adolescents 2 to 18 years old. Nutrient intakes, socioeconomic differences, body mass index (BMI) z-scores, and intakes of several food groups were examined across the identified grain patterns of consumption. We employed k-mean cluster analysis to identify the consumption patterns of grain products. Based on the contributions of 21 grain food groups to the total energy intake of each individual, seven GBF consumption patterns were identified including other bread; salty snacks; pasta; rice; cakes and cookies; white bread; and mixed grains. Individuals having less than one serving of grain products were also separately categorized as no-grain consumers. Mean energy intake (kcal/day) was lowest for the “no-grain” consumers and greatest in children/adolescents consuming a “salty snacks” pattern when all GBF patterns were compared. Children and adolescents with “no-grain” and “rice” GBF consumption patterns had significantly lower intakes of several nutrients including dietary fiber, folate, magnesium, calcium, iron, zinc, thiamin, niacin, and riboflavin. No associations were observed with any of the identified GBF patterns and BMI z-scores. In addition, the socioeconomic status (SES) indicators such as household incomes and immigration status of participants were shown to be significantly different across the identified clusters. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

17 pages, 713 KiB  
Article
Clustering of Metabolic Risk Components and Associated Lifestyle Factors: A Nationwide Adolescent Study in Taiwan
by Wei-Ting Lin, Chun-Ying Lee, Sharon Tsai, Hsiao-Ling Huang, Pei-Wen Wu, Yu-Ting Chin, David W. Seal, Ted Chen, Yu-Ying Chao and Chien-Hung Lee
Nutrients 2019, 11(3), 584; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11030584 - 9 Mar 2019
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 3560
Abstract
Clustering of metabolic syndrome (MetS) risk components in childhood has been linked to a higher risk of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases in adulthood. By using data from the 2010–2011 Nutrition and Health Survey in Taiwan, this study investigated epidemic patterns and correlates for [...] Read more.
Clustering of metabolic syndrome (MetS) risk components in childhood has been linked to a higher risk of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases in adulthood. By using data from the 2010–2011 Nutrition and Health Survey in Taiwan, this study investigated epidemic patterns and correlates for the clustering of MetS risk components. A total of 1920 adolescents aged 12–18 years were included in this study. The MetS diagnostic criteria defined by the Taiwan Pediatric Association (TPA) and International Diabetes Federation (IDF) for adolescents and the criteria defined by the Joint Interim Statement for adults (JIS-Adult) were used to evaluate MetS and its abnormal components. The prevalence of TPA-, IDF-, and JIS-Adult-defined MetS was 4.1%, 3.0%, and 4.0%, with 22.1%, 19.3%, and 17.7%–18.1% of adolescents having high fasting glucose, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and central obesity, respectively. A 0.4-to-0.5-fold decreased risk of having ≥2 MetS abnormal components was detected among adolescents who consumed ≥1 serving/week of dairy products and fresh fruits. Boys who consumed ≥7 drinks/week of soda and girls who consumed ≥7 drinks/week of tea had a 4.6- and 5.2-fold risk of MetS, respectively. In conclusion, our findings revealed significant dimensions of adolescent MetS, including detecting population-specific prevalent patterns for MetS risk components and their clustering, and emphasized on health promotion activities that reduce sugar-sweetened beverage intake. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

24 pages, 859 KiB  
Article
Differences in the Quantity and Types of Foods and Beverages Consumed by Canadians between 2004 and 2015
by Claire N. Tugault-Lafleur and Jennifer L. Black
Nutrients 2019, 11(3), 526; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11030526 - 28 Feb 2019
Cited by 45 | Viewed by 8864 | Correction
Abstract
This study examined differences in food and beverage intake estimated from nationally representative surveys of Canadians in 2004 and 2015 collected through the Canadian Community Health Surveys. Differences in mean daily energy intake and amounts of food consumed were compared between 2004 and [...] Read more.
This study examined differences in food and beverage intake estimated from nationally representative surveys of Canadians in 2004 and 2015 collected through the Canadian Community Health Surveys. Differences in mean daily energy intake and amounts of food consumed were compared between 2004 and 2015 and across age groups for all energy reporters (aged 2 years+) and among only plausible energy reporters. From 2004 to 2015, mean energy intake decreased by 228 kcal/day (all energy reporters) and 74 kcal/day (plausible energy reporters). Canadians reported consuming more daily servings of meat and alternatives but fewer servings of vegetables and fruit and milk and alternatives in 2015 compared to 2004. Analyses of food subgroups revealed that Canadians reported consuming more daily servings of dark green and orange vegetables, dairy products, legumes, nuts and seeds, and eggs but fewer servings of potatoes, other vegetables, fruit juices, fluid milk, and sugar-sweetened beverages in 2015 compared to 2004. While some aspects of the Canadian diet have improved, daily mean intake of other nutritious foods either stagnated or worsened over time. Continued attention is needed to improve population-level intakes of vegetables, fruit, whole grains, and protein foods such as legumes, nuts, seeds, and lower fat dairy products. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

10 pages, 1802 KiB  
Article
Brazilian Foodborne Disease National Survey: Evaluating the Landscape after 11 Years of Implementation to Advance Research, Policy, and Practice in Public Health
by Cainara Lins Draeger, Rita de Cassia Coelho de Almeida Akutsu, Renata Puppin Zandonadi, Izabel Cristina Rodrigues Da Silva, Raquel Braz Assunção Botelho and Wilma Maria Coelho Araújo
Nutrients 2019, 11(1), 40; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11010040 - 25 Dec 2018
Cited by 25 | Viewed by 4976
Abstract
The poor control of public and private agencies regarding the quality of foods offered to populations has a significant impact on the occurrence of foodborne diseases. Precise information about foodborne diseases (FBD) can adequately inform policy-makers and help to allocate appropriate resources for [...] Read more.
The poor control of public and private agencies regarding the quality of foods offered to populations has a significant impact on the occurrence of foodborne diseases. Precise information about foodborne diseases (FBD) can adequately inform policy-makers and help to allocate appropriate resources for the control of food safety. This study aimed to evaluate the Brazilian foodborne disease landscape after 11 years of implementation of the Epidemiological Surveillance System of Foodborne Diseases. The study analyzed secondary data from the National System of Injuries and Notifications (SINAN-NET), available from the Health Department. We evaluated the characteristics of FBD, such as the food involved, the location of ingestion, the total time to the outcome investigation, the microorganism involved and deaths. We also calculated the global incidence, mortality and lethality rates of the country. There were 7630 FBD outbreaks in the National Epidemiological Surveillance System of Foodborne Diseases (VE-DTA). Of the registered reports, a total of 134,046 individuals were sick with FBD; 19,394 were hospitalized, and there were 127 registered deaths. We found a coefficient of incidence of FBD of 67.57 per 100,000 inhabitants; a mortality coefficient of 0.06 per 100,000 inhabitants and lethality of 0.09% over the 11 years investigated. Data are probably underreported since the VE-DTA system lacks completeness, and because FBD symptoms are mostly mild, a large part of the population does not seek care from health services. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop