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Article

Consumption of Yogurt in Canada and Its Contribution to Nutrient Intake and Diet Quality Among Canadians

1
College of Pharmacy and Nutrition, School of Public Health, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 4Z2, Canada
2
Bell Institute of Health and Nutrition, General Mills, Minneapolis, MN 55427-3870, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(6), 1203; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11061203
Received: 4 April 2019 / Revised: 23 May 2019 / Accepted: 24 May 2019 / Published: 28 May 2019
The current study utilizes a nationally representative nutrition survey data (Canadian Community Health Survey 2015, nutrition component, n = 20,487) in order to evaluate patterns of yogurt consumption among Canadians. Overall, 20% of Canadians have reportedly consumed yogurt on a given day in 2015. Higher prevalence of yogurt consumption was noted among children aged 2–5 years old (47%) when compared to adults aged 19–54 years (18%). When the prevalence of yogurt consumption at the regional level in Canada was assessed, Quebec had the most consumers of yogurt (25%) compared to other regions, namely the Atlantic (19%), Ontario (18%), Prairies (19%) and British Columbia (20%). Yogurt consumers reported consuming higher daily intakes of several key nutrients including carbohydrates, fibre, riboflavin, vitamin C, folate, vitamin D, potassium, iron, magnesium, and calcium when compared to yogurt non-consumers. Additionally, the diet quality, measured using NRF 9.3 scoring method, was higher among yogurt consumers compared to non-consumers. Nearly 36% of Canadians who meet the dietary guidelines for milk and alternative servings from the Food Guide Canada (2007) reported consuming yogurt. Lastly, no significant difference in BMI was noted among yogurt consumers and non-consumers. Overall, yogurt consumers had a higher intake of key nutrients and had a better diet quality. View Full-Text
Keywords: yogurt; nutrient intake; dietary assessment; diet quality yogurt; nutrient intake; dietary assessment; diet quality
MDPI and ACS Style

Vatanparast, H.; Islam, N.; Patil, R.P.; Shamloo, A.; Keshavarz, P.; Smith, J.; Whiting, S. Consumption of Yogurt in Canada and Its Contribution to Nutrient Intake and Diet Quality Among Canadians. Nutrients 2019, 11, 1203. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11061203

AMA Style

Vatanparast H, Islam N, Patil RP, Shamloo A, Keshavarz P, Smith J, Whiting S. Consumption of Yogurt in Canada and Its Contribution to Nutrient Intake and Diet Quality Among Canadians. Nutrients. 2019; 11(6):1203. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11061203

Chicago/Turabian Style

Vatanparast, Hassan, Naorin Islam, Rashmi P. Patil, Arash Shamloo, Pardis Keshavarz, Jessica Smith, and Susan Whiting. 2019. "Consumption of Yogurt in Canada and Its Contribution to Nutrient Intake and Diet Quality Among Canadians" Nutrients 11, no. 6: 1203. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11061203

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