Special Issue "Nanomaterials for Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Synthesis, Interfaces and Nanostructures".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Andrzej Kudelski
Website
Guest Editor
University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland
Interests: Synthesis of new nanomaterials for Raman spectroscopy analysis of surfaces; Photochemical synthesis and reconstruction of silver nanostructures including their so-called plasmon-driven transformation; Application of surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy for DNA detection
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

For many decades, Raman spectroscopy has not been considered a useful analytical tool because of the very low efficiency of “normal” Raman scattering (the typical cross-section for Raman scattering is 11 and 8 orders of magnitude smaller than the typical cross-sections for absorption in ultraviolet and infrared). However, by utilizing special electromagnetic resonators constructed from plasmonic metals, the Raman scattering cross-sections could be increased by many orders of magnitude, making possible the observation of good-quality Raman spectra of even a single molecule. This effect is called SERS (surface-enhanced Raman scattering). Crucial to obtaining strong SERS signal is the application of an efficient SERS substrate. This Special Issue of Nanomaterials will attempt to cover the recent advances in nanomaterials for SERS spectroscopy, concerning not only their synthesis, but also simulations of the obtained local SERS enhancement factors and the applications of new nanomaterials in chemical and biochemical SERS analysis.

Dr. Andrzej Kudelski
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • multifunctional materials
  • plasmonic nanostructures
  • surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy
  • SERS sensors
  • SERS biosensors
  • shell-isolated nanoparticle-enhanced Raman spectroscopy
  • SERS substrates
  • tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Gold-Deposited Nickel Foam as Recyclable Plasmonic Sensor for Therapeutic Drug Monitoring in Blood by Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(9), 1756; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10091756 - 06 Sep 2020
Abstract
A sensitive and recyclable plasmonic nickel foam sensor has been developed for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). A simple electrochemical method was used to deposit flower-shaped gold nanostructures onto nickel foam substrate. The high packing of the gold nanoflowers onto the nickel foam led [...] Read more.
A sensitive and recyclable plasmonic nickel foam sensor has been developed for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). A simple electrochemical method was used to deposit flower-shaped gold nanostructures onto nickel foam substrate. The high packing of the gold nanoflowers onto the nickel foam led to a high enhancement factor (EF) of 1.6 × 1011. The new SERS sensor was utilized for the direct determination of the broad-spectrum β-lactam carbapenem antibiotic meropenem in human blood plasma down to one pM. The sensor was also used in High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC)-SERS assembly to provide fingerprint identification of meropenem in human blood plasma. Moreover, the SERS measurements were reproducible in aqueous solution and human blood plasma (RSD = 5.5%) and (RSD = 2.86%), respectively at 200 µg/mL (n = 3), and successfully recycled using a simple method, and hence, used for the repeated determination of the drug by SERS. Therefore, the new sensor has a strong potential to be applied for the therapeutic drug monitoring of meropenem at points of care and intensive care units. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy)
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Open AccessArticle
Gold Nanorod Assemblies: The Roles of Hot-Spot Positioning and Anisotropy in Plasmon Coupling and SERS
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(5), 942; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10050942 - 14 May 2020
Cited by 4
Abstract
Plasmon-coupled colloidal nanoassemblies with carefully sculpted “hot-spots” and intense surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) are in high demand as photostable and sensitive plasmonic nano-, bio-, and chemosensors. When maximizing SERS signals, it is particularly challenging to control the hot-spot density, precisely position the hot-spots [...] Read more.
Plasmon-coupled colloidal nanoassemblies with carefully sculpted “hot-spots” and intense surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) are in high demand as photostable and sensitive plasmonic nano-, bio-, and chemosensors. When maximizing SERS signals, it is particularly challenging to control the hot-spot density, precisely position the hot-spots to intensify the plasmon coupling, and introduce the SERS molecule in those intense hot-spots. Here, we investigated the importance of these factors in nanoassemblies made of a gold nanorod (AuNR) core and spherical nanoparticle (AuNP) satellites with ssDNA oligomer linkers. Hot-spot positioning at the NR tips was made possible by selectively burying the ssDNA in the lateral facets via controlled Ag overgrowth while retaining their hybridization and assembly potential at the tips. This strategy, with slight alterations, allowed us to form nanoassemblies that only contained satellites at the NR tips, i.e., directional anisotropic nanoassemblies; or satellites randomly positioned around the NR, i.e., nondirectional nanoassemblies. Directional nanoassemblies featured strong plasmon coupling as compared to nondirectional ones, as a result of strategically placing the hot-spots at the most intense electric field position of the AuNR, i.e., retaining the inherent plasmon anisotropy. Furthermore, as the dsDNA was located in these anisotropic hot-spots, this allowed for the tag-free detection down to ~10 dsDNA and a dramatic SERS enhancement of ~1.6 × 108 for the SERS tag SYBR gold, which specifically intercalates into the dsDNA. This dramatic SERS performance was made possible by manipulating the anisotropy of the nanoassemblies, which allowed us to emphasize the critical role of hot-spot positioning and SERS molecule positioning in nanoassemblies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy)
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Open AccessArticle
Synthesis of Monolayer Gold Nanorings Sandwich Film and Its Higher Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Intensity
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(3), 519; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10030519 - 13 Mar 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Most previous studies relating to surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) signal enhancement were focused on the interaction between the light and the substrate in the x-y axis. 3D SERS substrates reported in the most of previous papers could contribute partial SERS enhancement [...] Read more.
Most previous studies relating to surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) signal enhancement were focused on the interaction between the light and the substrate in the x-y axis. 3D SERS substrates reported in the most of previous papers could contribute partial SERS enhancement via z axis, but the increases of the surface area were the main target for those reports. However, the z axis is also useful in achieving improved SERS intensity. In this work, hot spots along the z axis were specifically created in a sandwich nanofilm. Sandwich nanofilms were prepared with self-assembly and Langmuir-Blodgett techniques, and comprised of monolayer Au nanorings sandwiched between bottom Ag mirror and top Ag cover films. Monolayer Au nanorings were formed by self-assembly at the interface of water and hexane, followed by Langmuir-Blodgett transfer to a substrate with sputtered Ag mirror film. Their hollow property allows the light transmitted through a cover film. The use of a Ag cover layer of tens nanometers in thickness was critical, which allowed light access to the middle Au nanorings and the bottom Ag mirror, resulting in more plasmonic resonance and coupling along perpendicular interfaces (z-axis). The as-designed sandwich nanofilms could achieve an overall ~8 times SERS signals amplification compared to only the Au nanorings layer, which was principally attributed to enhanced electromagnetic fields along the created z-axis. Theoretical simulations based on finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method showed consistent results with the experimental ones. This study points out a new direction to enhance the SERS intensity by involving more hot spots in z-axis in a designer nanostructure for high-performance molecular recognition and detection. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Substrates for Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Formed on Nanostructured Non-Metallic Materials: Preparation and Characterization
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(1), 75; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11010075 - 31 Dec 2020
Abstract
The efficiency of the generation of Raman spectra by molecules adsorbed on some substrates (or placed at a very close distance to some substrates) may be many orders of magnitude larger than the efficiency of the generation of Raman spectra by molecules that [...] Read more.
The efficiency of the generation of Raman spectra by molecules adsorbed on some substrates (or placed at a very close distance to some substrates) may be many orders of magnitude larger than the efficiency of the generation of Raman spectra by molecules that are not adsorbed. This effect is called surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). In the first SERS experiments, nanostructured plasmonic metals have been used as SERS-active materials. Later, other types of SERS-active materials have also been developed. In this review article, various SERS substrates formed on nanostructured non-metallic materials, including non-metallic nanostructured thin films or non-metallic nanoparticles covered by plasmonic metals and SERS-active nanomaterials that do not contain plasmonic metals, are described. Significant advances for many important applications of SERS spectroscopy of substrates based on nanostructured non-metallic materials allow us to predict a large increase in the significance of such nanomaterials in the near future. Some future perspectives on the application of SERS substrates utilizing nanostructured non-metallic materials are also presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Gold nanorod assemblies: the role of hot-spot positioning and anisotropy on plasmon coupling and SERS
Authors: Priyanka Dey,1,2,3* Verena Baumann,1,2 and Jessica Rodríguez-Fernández,1,2,4
Affiliation: [1] Department of Physics and CeNS, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Munich, Germany. [2] Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM), Munich, Germany. Current affiliation: PD: [3] School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Exeter, Exeter, United Kingdom. Current affiliation: JRF: [4] Wacker Chemie AG, Johannes-Hess-Straße 24, 84489 Burghausen, Germany.
Abstract: Plasmon-coupled colloidal nano-assemblies with maximized surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) are in high demand as plasmonic nano/bio/chemo sensors. So controlling the hot-spot density, precisely positioning the hot-spots for intensifying the plasmon coupling and specifically introducing the SERS molecule at that intense hot-spot is both eminent and challenging. We investigated their importance in nano-assemblies made of gold nanorod (AuNR) core and spherical nanoparticle (AuNP) satellites interconnected with ssDNA oligomers. Hot-spot positioning at the core NR tips were made possible by selectively burying the ssDNA at the lateral facets whereas retaining their hybridization and assembly potential at the tips. This strategy, with slight alterations, allowed us to form nano-assemblies with satellites only at the NR tips i.e., directional anisotropic nano-assemblies or satellites randomly positioned around the NR i.e., non-directional nano-assemblies. Directional nano-assemblies provided significantly improved plasmon coupling and significant SERS amplification of the interconnecting ssDNA, thus emphasizing the critical role of anisotropy, hot-spot positioning and SERS molecule positioning in nano-assemblies.

Title: Recent progress on the application of metal organic framework in surface enhanced Raman scattering
Authors: Guoliang Li
Affiliation: School of Food and Biological Engineering, Shaanxi University of Science & Technology, Xi'an 710021, China
Abstract: In recent years, metal organic framework (MOF) based surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has attracted much attention since MOF can largely improve the performance of SERS substrate toward target enrichment and signal enhancement. The combination of MOF and SERS improved the sensitivity of traditional SERS analysis and expended the application scope of SERS. The development and application of the MOF based SERS for the detection of chemical contaminants are discussed. The main advantages of using MOF based SERS are highlighted, as well as its limitations. Last but not least, promising future trends and application of MOF based SERS are also discussed.

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