Special Issue "Nanostructured Surfaces and Thin Films Synthesis by Physical Vapor Deposition"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 January 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Rafael Alvarez Website E-Mail
Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla (ICMS), Seville 41092, Spain
Departamento de Física Aplicada I. Universidad de Sevilla, Seville 41011, Spain
Interests: nanostructured thin films; oblique angle deposition; magnetron sputtering; nanoporosity; growth simulation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The synthesis of nanostructured surfaces and thin films by means of physical vapor deposition is currently a field of great interest in both scientific and technological aspects. Techniques such as pulsed laser deposition, magnetron sputtering, HiPIMS, or e-beam evaporation, among others, are key for the development of applications in photovoltaic cells, tribological coatings, optofluidic sensors, or biotechnology, to name a few. The nanostructuration of the surface allows for the tailoring of the way a material interacts with the environment, providing a tuning mechanism for its properties, be them optical, mechanical, electrical, tribological, or chemical. Unfortunately, the processes responsible for the formation of a certain nanostructure are, in most of the cases, not known with the sufficient depth to gain such a level of control. It is then necessary to study these nanostructuration mechanisms from both a technological point of view, by creating surfaces with novel nanostructures and applications, and by addressing more fundamental issues so that these processes are better understood.

This Special Issue invites manuscripts that present significant advances concerning both fundamental and applied research topics, which include but are not limited to the following:

  • Thin film nanostructuration processes;
  • Nanostructural properties;
  • Anisotropic nanostructured surfaces;
  • Atomistic processes during film synthesis;
  • Simulation of nanostructured surfaces;
  • Applications of nanostructured thin films;
  • Devices.

Dr. Rafael Alvarez
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Thin film growth
  • Nanostructure
  • Nanoporous surface
  • Synthesis methods
  • Physical vapor deposition
  • Surface properties

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Antibacterial Nanostructured Ti Coatings by Magnetron Sputtering: From Laboratory Scales to Industrial Reactors
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(9), 1217; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9091217 - 28 Aug 2019
Abstract
Based on an already tested laboratory procedure, a new magnetron sputtering methodology to simultaneously coat two-sides of large area implants (up to ~15 cm2) with Ti nanocolumns in industrial reactors has been developed. By analyzing the required growth conditions in a [...] Read more.
Based on an already tested laboratory procedure, a new magnetron sputtering methodology to simultaneously coat two-sides of large area implants (up to ~15 cm2) with Ti nanocolumns in industrial reactors has been developed. By analyzing the required growth conditions in a laboratory setup, a new geometry and methodology have been proposed and tested in a semi-industrial scale reactor. A bone plate (DePuy Synthes) and a pseudo-rectangular bone plate extracted from a patient were coated following the new methodology, obtaining that their osteoblast proliferation efficiency and antibacterial functionality were equivalent to the coatings grown in the laboratory reactor on small areas. In particular, two kinds of experiments were performed: Analysis of bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation, and osteoblasts–bacteria competitive in vitro growth scenarios. In all these cases, the coatings show an opposite behavior toward osteoblast and bacterial proliferation, demonstrating that the proposed methodology represents a valid approach for industrial production and practical application of nanostructured titanium coatings. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Design of Nanoscaled Surface Morphology of TiO2–Ag2O Composite Nanorods through Sputtering Decoration Process and Their Low-Concentration NO2 Gas-Sensing Behaviors
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(8), 1150; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9081150 - 11 Aug 2019
Abstract
TiO2–Ag2O composite nanorods with various Ag2O configurations were synthesized by a two-step process, in which the core TiO2 nanorods were prepared by the hydrothermal method and subsequently the Ag2O crystals were deposited by sputtering [...] Read more.
TiO2–Ag2O composite nanorods with various Ag2O configurations were synthesized by a two-step process, in which the core TiO2 nanorods were prepared by the hydrothermal method and subsequently the Ag2O crystals were deposited by sputtering deposition. Two types of the TiO2–Ag2O composite nanorods were fabricated; specifically, discrete Ag2O particle-decorated TiO2 composite nanorods and layered Ag2O-encapsulated TiO2 core–shell nanorods were designed by controlling the sputtering duration of the Ag2O. The structural analysis revealed that the TiO2–Ag2O composite nanorods have high crystallinity. Moreover, precise control of the Ag2O sputtering duration realized the dispersive decoration of the Ag2O particles on the surfaces of the TiO2 nanorods. By contrast, aggregation of the massive Ag2O particles occurred with a prolonged Ag2O sputtering duration; this engendered a layered coverage of the Ag2O clusters on the surfaces of the TiO2 nanorods. The TiO2–Ag2O composite nanorods with different Ag2O coverage morphologies were used as chemoresistive sensors for the detection of trace amounts of NO2 gas. The NO2 gas-sensing performances of various TiO2–Ag2O composite nanorods were compared with that of pristine TiO2 nanorods. The underlying mechanisms for the enhanced sensing performance were also discussed. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Simultaneous Thermal Stability and Ultrahigh Sensitivity of Heterojunction SERS Substrates
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(6), 830; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9060830 - 31 May 2019
Abstract
This paper reports the design of Ag-Al2O3-Ag heterojunctions based on Ag nanorods (AgNRs) and their applications as thermally stable and ultrasensitive substrates of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Specifically, an ultrathin Al2O3 capping layer of 10 nm [...] Read more.
This paper reports the design of Ag-Al2O3-Ag heterojunctions based on Ag nanorods (AgNRs) and their applications as thermally stable and ultrasensitive substrates of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Specifically, an ultrathin Al2O3 capping layer of 10 nm on top of AgNRs serves to slow down the surface diffusion of Ag at high temperatures. Then, an additional Ag layer on top of the capping layer creates AgNRs-Al2O3-Ag heterojunctions, which lead to giant enhancement of electromagnetic fields within the Al2O3 gap regions that could boost the SERS enhancement. As a result of this design, the SERS substrates are thermally stable up to 200 °C, which has been increased by more than 100 °C compared with bare AgNRs, and their sensitivity is about 400% that of pure AgNRs. This easy yet effective capping approach offers a pathway to fabricate ultrasensitive, thermally stable and easily prepared SERS sensors, and to extend SERS applications for high-temperature detections, such as monitoring in situ the molecule reorientation process upon annealing. Such simultaneous achievement of thermal stability and SERS sensitivity represents a great advance in the design of SERS sensors and will inspire the fabrication of novel hetero-nanostructures. Full article
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