Special Issue "Nanospace Materials"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Yusuke Yamauchi
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Guest Editor
[1] School of Chem Eng / Faculty of Engineering, Architecture and Information Technology (EAIT), The University of Queensland, Australia
[2] Senior Group Leader/ Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (AIBN), The University of Queensland, Australia
Interests: inorganic chemistry; materials chemistry
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Tang Jing

Guest Editor
Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (AIBN), The University of Queensland, Australia
Interests: porous carbon; electrocatalysts; MOFs

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Different types of inorganic nanomaterials have been designed using various methods, including sol–gel, electrochemical/chemical reduction, calcination, hydrothermal reaction, etc. The dimensionality of these nanomaterials (x, y, z) can be classified as zero-dimensional (0D), one-dimensional (1D), two-dimensional (2D), or three-dimensional (3D), respectively. Accordingly, for 0D nanomaterials, dimensions are measured on the nanoscale (<100 nm for each dimension). 0D nanomaterials, for example, nanoparticles (or sometimes, nanocrystals), most commonly have isotropic morphologies where the usually thermodynamically stable planes of lower reactivity are exposed at the nanoparticles’ surfaces. For 1D nanomaterials, a single dimension is extended beyond the nanoscale. This class of nanomaterials includes nanotubes, nanorods, and nanowires. In contrast to 0D and 1D nanomaterials, 2D nanomaterials have recently attracted great interest for the next generation of promising applications. However, such 2D materials are often formed by stacking/assembled together, a process that reduces their active surface areas and devalues their potential in many important applications. Despite recent and significant advances in inorganic nanomaterials of different dimensionalities, we still remain active in making substantial efforts to develop new nanomaterials. We are fully aware of the serious limitations of the currently available materials’ designs. Exploring a new nanomaterials design paradigm is key for the next generation of nanomaterials research.

Prof. Dr. Yusuke Yamauchi
Dr. Tang Jing
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Gram-Scale Synthesis of Bimetallic ZIFs and Their Thermal Conversion to Nanoporous Carbon Materials
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(12), 1796; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9121796 - 17 Dec 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
The hybrid metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with different Zn2+/Co2+ ratios are synthesized at room temperature with deionized water as the solvent. This use of deionized water can increase the yield of hybrid MOFs (up to 65–70%). After the pyrolysis, the obtained [...] Read more.
The hybrid metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with different Zn2+/Co2+ ratios are synthesized at room temperature with deionized water as the solvent. This use of deionized water can increase the yield of hybrid MOFs (up to 65–70%). After the pyrolysis, the obtained nanoporous carbons (NPCs) show a decrease in the surface area, in which the highest surface area is 655 m2 g−1. The as-prepared NPCs are subjected to activation with KOH in order to increase their surface area and convert cobalt nanoparticles (Co NPs) to Co oxides. These activated carbons are applied to electrical double-layer capacitors (EDLCs) and pseudocapacitors due to the presence of CoO and Co3O4 nanoparticles in the carbon framework, leading to significantly enhanced specific capacitance as compared to that of pristine NPCs. This synthetic method can be utilized in future research to enhance pseudocapacitance further while maintaining the maximum surface area of the carbon materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanospace Materials)
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