Special Issue "Nano Self-Cleaning Coatings"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Synthesis, Interfaces and Nanostructures".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Rafael J. Taboryski
Website
Guest Editor
DTU Nanolab - National Centre for Nano Fabrication and Characterization, Technical University of Denmark, Ørsteds Plads, Building 347, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark
Interests: fabrication and characterization of metamaterials; functional properties of nanostructured surfaces; surface wetting phenomena; micro and nanofabrication techniques of polymers, Si and glass; microfluidics; electrophysiology; electrochemical biosensors
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Controlling the repellent properties of surface coatings is important in many aspects of engineering solutions for healthcare, water-oil separation, energy conversion, and corrosion protection, just to mention a few key applications. In recent years, coatings with composites comprised of silica nanoparticles and metal oxides in particular have generated considerable interest for various applications. Especially the photocatalytic properties of many metal oxides have spawned considerable interest. For surface engineering, both bottom-up approaches (comprising coatings by nanoparticle suspensions) and top-down approaches (comprising advanced nanofabrication techniques with subsequent coatings to define surface chemistries) were proposed to engineer surface texture and surface chemistry.

As scientists, we can contribute by providing a deeper understanding of the fundamental self-cleaning phenomena and demonstrate the solutions. For inspiration, we can look at the solutions such as the lotus effect already developed by nature through millions of years of evolution. Many of those biomimetic designs comprise hierarchical surface textures on the both micro- and nano-scale.

We invite you to submit your contribution to this field of applied science in the form of a scientific paper.

Dr. Rafael J. Taboryski
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • hydrophobic
  • oleophobic
  • repellent
  • lotus effect
  • contact angle
  • silica nanoparticles
  • water-oil separation
  • metal oxides
  • corrosion resistance
  • photo-catalysis

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Simple Fabrication of Transparent, Colorless, and Self-Disinfecting Polyethylene Terephthalate Film via Cold Plasma Treatment
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(5), 949; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10050949 - 15 May 2020
Abstract
Cross-infection following cross-contamination is a serious social issue worldwide. Pathogens are normally spread by contact with germ-contaminated surfaces. Accordingly, antibacterial surface technologies are urgently needed and have consequently been actively developed in recent years. Among these technologies, biomimetic nanopatterned surfaces that physically kill [...] Read more.
Cross-infection following cross-contamination is a serious social issue worldwide. Pathogens are normally spread by contact with germ-contaminated surfaces. Accordingly, antibacterial surface technologies are urgently needed and have consequently been actively developed in recent years. Among these technologies, biomimetic nanopatterned surfaces that physically kill adhering bacteria have attracted attraction as an effective technological solution to replace toxic chemical disinfectants (biocides). Herein, we introduce a transparent, colorless, and self-disinfecting polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film that mimics the surface structure of the Progomphus obscurus (sanddragon) wing physically killing the attached bacteria. The PET film was partially etched via a 4-min carbon tetrafluoride (CF4) plasma treatment. Compared to a flat bare PET film, the plasma-treated film surface exhibited a uniform array structure composed of nanopillars with a 30 nm diameter, 237 nm height, and 75 nm pitch. The plasma-treated PET film showed improvements in optical properties (transmittance and B*) and antibacterial effectiveness over the bare film; the transparency and colorlessness slightly increased, and the antibacterial activity increased from 53.8 to 100% for Staphylococcus aureus, and from 0 to 100% for Escherichia coli. These results demonstrated the feasibility of the CF4 plasma-treated PET film as a potential antibacterial overcoating with good optical properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nano Self-Cleaning Coatings)
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