Special Issue "Nanomaterials for Biomedical and Biotechnological Applications"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Angelo Ferraro
Website
Guest Editor
National Technical University of Athens, Athens, Greece
Interests: nanoparticles; bioseparation; magnetic separation; cell biology; molecular oncology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

There are numerous biotechnological applications of nanomaterials in biomedical and clinic fields as well as industrial processing. Some examples include drug delivery, anti-tumor therapies, stem cell manipulation, genes transfer, separation of biomolecules and ions, biosensors, and biofuel production, among others. The great potential that these applications have in scaling up industrial processing or improving the efficiency and efficacy of medical treatments is becoming increasingly evident. Important aspects for the use of nanomaterials are their synthesis, stability, biocompatibility, and easy manipulation. All these parameters need constant improvement both to reach a high standard of safety and to make them accessible for marketing.

This Special Issue focused on Nanomaterial for Biomedical and Biotechnological Applications will highlight the latest methodologies, protocols, and techniques that employ nanomaterials as the main element for the improvement of biomedical treatments, as well as biotechnological processes.

Dr. Angelo Ferraro
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Bio-separation
  • Biosensor
  • Drug-delivery
  • Bioremediation
  • Oncology

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Pushing of Magnetic Microdroplet Using Electromagnetic Actuation System
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(2), 371; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10020371 - 20 Feb 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Treatment of certain diseases requires the administration of drugs at specific areas of tissues and/or organs to increase therapy effectiveness and avoid side effects that may harm the rest of the body. Drug targeting is a research field that uses various techniques to [...] Read more.
Treatment of certain diseases requires the administration of drugs at specific areas of tissues and/or organs to increase therapy effectiveness and avoid side effects that may harm the rest of the body. Drug targeting is a research field that uses various techniques to administrate therapies at specific areas of the body, including magnetic systems able to drive nano “vehicles”, as well as magnetically labeled molecules, in human body fluids and tissues. Most available actuation systems can only attract magnetic elements in a relatively small workspace, limiting drug target applications to superficial tissues, and leaving no alternative cases where deep targeting is necessary. In this paper, we propose an electromagnetic actuation system able to push and deflect magnetic particles at distance of ~10 cm, enabling the manipulation of magnetic nano- and microparticles, as well as administration of drugs in tissues, which are not eligible for localized drug targeting with state-of-the-art systems. Laboratory experiments and modeling were conducted to prove the effectiveness of the proposed system. By further implementing our device, areas of the human body that previously were impossible to treat with magnetically labeled materials such as drugs, cells, and small molecules can now be accessible using the described system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Biomedical and Biotechnological Applications)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Synthesis of Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles Using Various Methods: Implications for Biomedical Applications
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(2), 242; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10020242 - 29 Jan 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Cerium oxide nanoparticles have been used in a number of non-medical products over the years. The therapeutic application of these nanoparticles has mainly been due to their oxidative stress ameliorating abilities. Their enzyme-mimetic catalytic ability to change between the Ce3+ and Ce [...] Read more.
Cerium oxide nanoparticles have been used in a number of non-medical products over the years. The therapeutic application of these nanoparticles has mainly been due to their oxidative stress ameliorating abilities. Their enzyme-mimetic catalytic ability to change between the Ce3+ and Ce4+ species makes them ideal for a role as free-radical scavengers for systemic diseases as well as neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we look at various methods of synthesis (including the use of stabilizing/capping agents and precursors), and how the synthesis method affects the physicochemical properties, their behavior in biological environments, their catalytic abilities as well as their reported toxicity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Biomedical and Biotechnological Applications)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Pushing cluster of magnetic nanoparticles using an electromagnetic actuation system
Authors: G. Banis; K. Tyrovolas; A. Ferraro; E. Hristoforou
Affiliation: Laboratory of Electronic Sensors, National TU of Athens, Zografou Campus, Athens 15780, Greece
Abstract: Treatment of particular diseases requires the administration of drugs at very specific areas of tissues and/or organs in order to increase therapy effectiveness and avoid possible side effects that may harm the rest of the body. Drug targeting is an evolving and promising research field that uses various techniques to achieve localized administration. Externally applied magnetic fields are able to drive nano “vehicles”, drugs or molecules labeled with magnetic particles in the human body fluid, blood vessels or other sites offering targeted therapies as well as microsurgery. However, most of the available actuation systems can only attract magnetic particles in a relatively small workspace limiting the possible applications only to superficial tissues, and leaving with no alternative cases where deep targeting is necessary. In this paper, we propose an electromagnetic actuation system able to push and steer magnetic particles at depths of ~10 cm, enabling the manipulation of magnetic nano- and microparticles as well as administration of drugs in tissues that were not possible to be treated by localized drug targeting. The apparatus consists of 4 coils, 2 cores, 4 power supplies and a control system. In vitro experiments and modeling were conducted to prove the effectiveness of the proposed system. By further implementing our device, areas of the human body that previously were impossible to be treated with magnetically labeled materials such as drugs, cells and small molecules, could be now accessible through the system that is described.

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